Virginia–Virginia Tech football rivalry
First contestedOctober 5, 1895
Number of meetings101
Most recent meetingNovember 29, 2019
Next meetingNovember 21, 2020
All-time seriesVirginia Tech leads, 58–38–5
Largest victoryVirginia Tech, 48–0 (1983)
Longest win streakVirginia Tech, 15 (2004–2018)
Current streakVirginia, 1 (2019-present)
File:Lane Stadium-1.jpg

Lane Stadium, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg

File:Virginia Scott Stadium 2006.jpg

Scott Stadium, University of Virginia, Charlottesville

The Virginia–Virginia Tech football rivalry is an American college football rivalry between the Virginia Cavaliers football team of the University of Virginia (called Virginia in sports media and abbreviated UVA) and Virginia Tech Hokies football team of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (called Virginia Tech and abbreviated VT). The two schools first met in 1895 and have played annually since 1970. The game counts for 1 point in the Commonwealth Clash each year, and is part of the greater Virginia–Virginia Tech rivalry.

Since 1964, the game has always been played at either Lane Stadium or Scott Stadium on the campuses of the two universities. But the series has at times been played in Richmond (1903–1904, 1957); Norfolk (1940–1942); and at Victory Stadium in Roanoke (17 of 19 years from 1945 to 1963). Since 2000, the game has been held in late November, often on Thanksgiving weekend.

Virginia Tech leads the series 58–37–5,[1] and the Cup series 20–3. Virginia Tech has held the Commonwealth Cup for the past 15 consecutive years with UVA's most recent win coming in 2003. Virginia Tech holds the third longest active winning streak against a conference rival in college football.[2] (Michigan and Ohio State currently have a 23 game winning streak against Indiana).

Virginia and Virginia Tech were both led by College Football Hall of Fame coaches in the 1980s and 1990s. George Welsh led UVA to a four week stint as the AP No. 1 ranked team in 1990, conference championships in 1989 and 1995 and holds a 9-10 record against Virginia Tech. Frank Beamer led Virginia Tech to a BCS National Championship appearance in 1999, conference championships in 1995, 1996, 1999, 2004, 2007, 2008 and 2010 and holds a 20-9 record against UVa.

Commonwealth Cup Trophy[edit | edit source]

In 1996, a trophy was created for the rivalry, known as the Commonwealth Cup. The winning team holds the trophy until the next game, which has been held annually since 1970. Currently, Virginia Tech holds the cup, having won the 2018 game. Their 2018 win marks 15 years of consecutive wins against UVA. The trophy is constructed of marble and cherry wood, and is four feet high. It also contains the scores of all of the games in the series.[3] The cup is engraved with the names of the two schools and is mounted atop a trapezoidal base that makes up most of the trophy's length. The front of the base features a stylized map of Virginia with Blacksburg and Charlottesville represented by stars on the map.[4]'

History[edit | edit source]

The Virginia-Virginia Tech rivalry has existed since the late 1800s, but did not reach pre-eminence until the 1980s. Traditionally, Virginia's primary rival had been the Tar Heels of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, which remains the South's Oldest Rivalry. Virginia Tech's rival was the Virginia Military Institute, with whom they shared a military tradition and similar acronyms (VMI and VPI).

Memorable games[edit | edit source]

1995: "Upset In Charlottesville" The Virginia Cavaliers came into the 95 contest looking for their ninth regular season win. Virginia led 29-14 going into the fourth quarter, however Virginia Tech then stormed back and a Jim Druckenmiller touchdown pass to Jermaine Holmes gave the Hokies the lead with forty seven seconds left. The Hoos last attempt to win the game was then snuffed out when a Mike Groh pass was intercepted and taken to the house by Antonio Banks, who avoided a sideline trip by UVA coach Joe Gieck. This humiliating loss was the third that season that the Hoos lost in the last minute. The win gave the Hokies a birth to the Sugar Bowl, while Virginia had to settle for the Peach Bowl

1998: “The Comeback” Both teams entered the 98’ matchup in ranked in the Top 25 and looking for their ninth win. Virginia Tech took no time jumping out in front. The Hokies took a 17-0 lead early and led at halftime 29-7. The Hoos then came out in the second half and outscored the Hokies 29-3. A now legendary touchdown pass from quarterback Aaron Brooks to Amhad Hawkins put Virginia up by four, and a Wali Rainer interception preserved a Virginia comeback victory, arguably their most impressive win in Blacksburg.

2003: “The Tech Killer” The Virginia Cavaliers entered the 03’ Commonwealth Cup looking to snap a four game losing streak against the Hokies. Virginia Tech led 14-7 at the half, but Virginia came out in the second half firing on all cylinders, and outscored Tech 21-0 by the 14 minute mark in the fourth quarter. Up by seven with only a few minutes left, Virginia pulled off a fake field goal on fourth down to keep possession away from the Hookies. Wali Lundy ran in it for the score on the next play, capping a dominant performance of three rushing touchdowns and a receiving touchdown. Virginia held on to the win 35-21. This game also saw Matt Shaub tie Shawn Moore for all time passing touchdowns at Virginia.

2011: “38-0 Bro” The 2011 matchup was one of the more anticipated matchup in the series history. The game served as a de facto play-in game for the 2011 ACC Championship as the winner would claim the Costal Division crown. The week prior to the game centered around UVa's sudden rise in the polls (24th in the AP) after four straight wins. Many media members believed UVa had a chance to topple the then ranked #5 Hokies in Charlottesville.[5] Virginia Tech won the anticipated matchup 38-0. The Hokies defense shut out the Cavalier offense, limiting them to 241 yards and four turnovers. Future first round pick David Wilson led the Hokie offense with 153 rushing yards and two touchdowns. After the game was over, Hokie quarterback Logan Thomas tweeted "38-0 bro" after being trolled by a UVa fan on Twitter. Thomas' tweet went viral and now "38-0 bro" is a common refrain among Virginia Tech fans.

2018: “The Fumble” The 2018 Commonwealth Cup saw arguably the most dramatic ending in the entire series. Virginia had high hopes of ending its brutal fourteen game losing streak against a Tech team that had struggled most of the season. Virginia Tech led 14-0 at halftime, only to fall behind by seven with only two minutes remaining. On the ensuing Tech drive, the Hokies drove all the way down to the redzone. Steven Peoples fumbled inside the five yard line, however Virginia’s defenders failed to scoop the ball up, and it was recovered by Hezekiah Grimsley in the endzone for a touchdown. The game went into overtime (the first in the series history) and the Hokies kicked a field goal to go up by three. On Virginia's second during their possession, quarterback Bryce Perkins fumbled a hand off to Jordan Ellis, which was recovered by the Hokies defense, ending the game.

Game results[edit | edit source]

Virginia victoriesVirginia Tech victoriesTie games
No.DateLocationWinnerScore
1 October 5, 1895 Charlottesville Virginia 38–0
2 October 31, 1896 Charlottesville Virginia 44–0
3 November 11, 1899 Charlottesville Virginia 28–0
4 November 14, 1900 Charlottesville Virginia 17–5
5 October 26, 1901 Charlottesville Virginia 16–0
6 November 15, 1902 Charlottesville Virginia 6–0
7 October 24, 1903 Richmond Virginia 21–0
8 November 5, 1904 Richmond Virginia 5–0
9 November 4, 1905 Charlottesville VPI 11–0
10 November 17, 1923 Charlottesville VPI 6–3
11 November 15, 1924 Charlottesville Virginia 6–0
12 November 14, 1925 Charlottesville Virginia 10–0
13 October 23, 1926 Blacksburg VPI 6–0
14 October 22, 1927 Charlottesville Virginia 7–0
15 November 10, 1928 Blacksburg VPI 20–0
16 November 9, 1929 Charlottesville VPI 32–12
17 November 8, 1930 Blacksburg VPI 31–13
18 November 14, 1931 Charlottesville Tie0–0
19 November 12, 1932 Blacksburg VPI 13–0
20 November 18, 1933 Charlottesville Tie6–6
21 November 17, 1934 Blacksburg VPI 19–6
22 November 16, 1935 Charlottesville Tie0–0
23 November 14, 1936 Blacksburg VPI 7–6
24 November 13, 1937 Charlottesville VPI 14–7
25 October 15, 1938 Blacksburg Virginia 14–6
26 November 18, 1939 Charlottesville VPI 13–0
27 November 2, 1940 Norfolk VPI 6–0
28 November 1, 1941 Norfolk Virginia 34–0
29 October 31, 1942 Norfolk VPI 20–14
30 October 27, 1945 Roanoke Virginia 31–13
31 October 5, 1946 Roanoke Tie21–21
32 October 4, 1947 Roanoke Virginia41–7
33 October 2, 1948 Roanoke Virginia 28–0
34 October 8, 1949 Roanoke Virginia 26–0
35 October 7, 1950 Roanoke Virginia 45–6
36 October 6, 1951 Roanoke Virginia 33–0
37 October 4, 1952 Roanoke #16 Virginia 42–0
38 September 26, 1953 Charlottesville VPI 20–6
39 October 23, 1954 Roanoke VPI 6–0
40 October 22, 1955 Roanoke VPI 17–13
41 October 27, 1956 Roanoke VPI 14–7
42 October 19, 1957 Richmond Virginia38–7
43 October 11, 1958 Roanoke VPI 22–13
44 October 17, 1959 Richmond VPI 40–14
45 October 22, 1960 Roanoke VPI 40–6
46 October 21, 1961 Roanoke VPI 20–0
47 October 6, 1962 Roanoke VPI 20–15
48 October 5, 1963 Roanoke VPI 10–0
49 October 3, 1964 Charlottesville Virginia 20–17
50 October 23, 1965 Blacksburg VPI 22–14
51 October 22, 1966 Charlottesville VPI 24–7
No.DateLocationWinnerScore
52 September 12, 1970 Blacksburg Virginia 7–0
53 November 6, 1971 Charlottesville Virginia Tech 6–0
54 September 16, 1972 Charlottesville Virginia 24–20
55 October 20, 1973 Blacksburg Virginia Tech 27–15
56 October 19, 1974 Charlottesville Virginia 28–27
57 October 18, 1975 Blacksburg Virginia Tech 24–17
58 October 16, 1976 Charlottesville Virginia Tech 14–10
59 October 15, 1977 Blacksburg Tie14–14
60 October 21, 1978 Charlottesville Virginia 17–7
61 November 10, 1979 Charlottesville Virginia 20–18
62 October 18, 1980 Blacksburg Virginia Tech 30–0
63 November 28, 1981 Charlottesville Virginia Tech 20–3
64 November 25, 1982 Blacksburg Virginia Tech 21–14
65 November 19, 1983 Charlottesville Virginia Tech 48–0
66 September 29, 1984 Blacksburg Virginia 26–23
67 October 19, 1985 Charlottesville Virginia Tech 28–10
68 October 25, 1986 Blacksburg Virginia Tech 42–10
69 September 19, 1987 Charlottesville Virginia 14–13
70 October 29, 1988 Blacksburg Virginia 16–10
71 November 11, 1989 Charlottesville #18 Virginia 32–25
72 November 24, 1990 Blacksburg Virginia Tech 38–13
73 November 23, 1991 Charlottesville #20 Virginia 38–0
74 November 21, 1992 Blacksburg #23 Virginia 41–38
75 November 20, 1993 Charlottesville Virginia Tech 20–17
76 November 19, 1994 Blacksburg #16 Virginia 42–23
77 November 18, 1995 Charlottesville #20 Virginia Tech 36–29
78 November 29, 1996 Blacksburg #17 Virginia Tech 26–9
79 November 29, 1997 Charlottesville Virginia 34–20
80 November 28, 1998 Blacksburg #16 Virginia 36–32
81 October 2, 1999 Charlottesville #8 Virginia Tech 31–7
82 November 25, 2000 Blacksburg #6 Virginia Tech 42–21
83 November 17, 2001 Charlottesville #18 Virginia Tech 31–17
84 November 30, 2002 Blacksburg #22 Virginia Tech 21–9
85 November 29, 2003 Charlottesville Virginia 35–21
86 November 27, 2004 Blacksburg #11 Virginia Tech 24–10
87 November 19, 2005 Charlottesville #7 Virginia Tech 52–14
88 November 25, 2006 Blacksburg #17 Virginia Tech 17–0
89 November 24, 2007 Charlottesville #8 Virginia Tech 33–21
90 November 29, 2008 Blacksburg Virginia Tech 17–14
91 November 28, 2009 Charlottesville #14 Virginia Tech 42–13
92 November 27, 2010 Blacksburg #14 Virginia Tech 37–7
93 November 26, 2011 Charlottesville #4 Virginia Tech 38–0
94 November 24, 2012 Blacksburg Virginia Tech 17–14
95 November 30, 2013 Charlottesville Virginia Tech 16–6
96 November 28, 2014 Blacksburg Virginia Tech 24–20
97 November 28, 2015 Charlottesville Virginia Tech 23–20
98 November 26, 2016 Blacksburg Virginia Tech 52–10
99 November 24, 2017 Charlottesville #24 Virginia Tech 10–0
100 November 23, 2018 Blacksburg Virginia Tech 34–31OT
Series: Virginia Tech leads 58–37–5

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

External links[edit | edit source]

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