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Robert Duffy
Sport(s)Football
Biographical details
Born(1903-05-13)May 13, 1903
Binghamton, New York
DiedDecember 9, 1974(1974-12-09) (aged 71)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Head coaching record
Overall6–9–1

Robert C. Duffy (May 13, 1903 – December 9, 1974) was the 20th head football coach at Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania and he held that position for two seasons, from 1927 until 1928.[1] After serving in World War II, he practiced law in Philadelphia and was elected Register of Wills as a Republican in 1953.

Duffy was born in Binghamton, New York in 1903. He graduated from Lafayette College in 1926, where he was an All-American football and basketball player. He later received his law degree from Dickinson Law School in 1929. While at Dickinson, he coached the football team there.[1] His overall coaching record at Dickinson was 6–9–1.[1] In 1930, he moved to Philadelphia to take up the practice of law.[1]

During World War II, Duffy was assigned to the T13th Transport Squadron, nicknamed "The Thirsty 13th," from September 1942 until January 1945, first as the Intelligence Officer, and then the Executive Officer—right-hand man of the Commanding Officer, in New Caledonia, New Hebrides, and Biak. According to various squadron members: "Duffy was like a father to us. If you needed something, Duffy would get it done." "He was the backbone of the squadron." "The mentor of everyone was Bob Duffy, and everyone hung out with him and played cards with him." "The men loved Major Duffy." [2]
File:Robert C. Duffy, 1943, New Caledonia, with 13th Troop Carrier Squadron, by Felder Cullum.jpg

After the war, Duffy returned to his law practice in Philadelphia. He also became involved with politics there as a Republican and was elected Register of Wills in 1953. While in office, he served as chairman of the Republican City Committee from 1953 to 1956. He did not run for re-election as Register of Wills in 1957, but continued his private law practice. Duffy also remained involved with football, serving as director of the College Football Hall of Fame and a trustee of the Pop Warner Conference. He died in 1974, at the age of 71.[1]

ReferencesEdit

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SourcesEdit

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