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In sports, the scout team, also referred to as a practice team, taxi squad, practice squad or practice roster, is a group of players on a team whose task is to emulate future opponents for the featured (or starting) players. Frequently used in American or Canadian football, these teams consist of less athletically developed or less skilled players. However, unlike a traditional scrimmage, scout teams often have to learn a variety of different football playbooks in order to simulate the tendencies of future opponents.

High school footballEdit

High school teams will normally use their junior varsity team as a scout team to prepare for their weekly opponents.

College footballEdit

In college athletics, teams often use the scout team to develop younger players to replace the current starters when they later leave the school. Thus, in college, players on the scout team often include redshirt scholarship athletes, those unable to compete in games because of transfer rules (common in Division I FBS football), and walk-ons.

National Football LeagueEdit

Each NFL team may keep up to eight members on its "practice squad" in addition to the 53-member main roster. They consist mostly of rookies who were cut in training camps and borderline NFL-caliber players. Both rookies and young veterans are eligible for the practice squad. However, a player cannot participate on the practice squad for more than three seasons, he is eligible for a third season only if the team has at least 53 players on its active/inactive list for the duration of that player's employment, or have no prior accrued seasons in the NFL (an accrued season is six or more games on the active roster); or if he has accrued a year of NFL experience on a club's 53-man active roster. If the player was on the active list for fewer than 9 games during their "only Accrued Season(s)", he maintains his eligibility for the practice squad. Games in which a player is listed as the third-string quarterback (a designation that has been abolished as of 2011) do not count as being on the active list.[1]

Practice squad players practice alongside regular roster players during the week, but they are not allowed to play in actual games. They can be paid considerably less than active squad players: The minimum salary from 2008 to 2010 is $5,200 per week (2008-2010)[1] for 17 weeks, or $88,400 per season, in comparison to the NFL minimum rookie salary of $285,000. In 2012 the minimum salary for a practice squad player is/was $5700, and the minimum rookie salary in 2012 is/was $390,000. Some practice squad players are paid considerably more, however. In 2006, the New England Patriots paid third-year player Billy Yates the full $425,000 he would have earned on the active roster.[2]

Practice squad players are free agents; they can be signed to any team's 53-man roster at any time during the season. In other words, NFL teams are free to "poach" other teams' practice squads without compensating the teams. Additionally, the NFL has a program through which foreign players may be assigned to teams' practice squads, called the International Practice Squad Program.[3]

ReferencesEdit



This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Practice squad.
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