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New Orleans Arena
The Nest

New Orleans Arena following the conclusion of the 2005-06 NBA season
Location 1501 Girod Street
New Orleans, Louisiana 70113
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Broke ground November 30, 1995[1]
Opened October 29, 1999[2]
Owner The State of Louisiana
Operator SMG
Construction cost $114 million
($150 million in 2020 dollars[3])
Architect Arthur Q. Davis and Partners
Billes-Manning Architects
Hewitt Washington and Associates
Project Manager CS Associates[4]
Structural engineer Walter P Moore[5]
Services engineer Smith Seckman Reid, Inc.[6]
General Contractor Manhattan[7]/Gibbs[5]
Tenants New Orleans Hornets (NBA) (2002–present)
New Orleans Brass (ECHL) (1999–2002)
New Orleans VooDoo (AFL) (2004-present)
Capacity Concerts: 19,000
Basketball: 18,500
Basketball (Hornets games): 17,188
Arena Football: 16,500

New Orleans Arena is a multi-purpose indoor arena in New Orleans, Louisiana. It is located in the city's Central Business District, adjacent to the Mercedes-Benz Superdome.

It has been home to the New Orleans Hornets of the NBA since 2002, and is also home to some Tulane University basketball games as well as some high school basketball games and other special events. The now-defunct New Orleans Brass of the ECHL played in the New Orleans Arena their last three seasons before their demise in 2002, caused in part by the arrival of the Hornets. Since February 2004, the New Orleans VooDoo, of the Arena Football League (AFL), played their home games in the arena until the team folded in 2008. The VooDoo resumed play at the Arena in March 2011.

The arena was completed in 1999 at a cost of $114 million and officially opened on October 19, 1999. The Brass was the main tenant for its first three years until the team was forced to fold after Hornets management demanded priority upon moving. The arena seats 19,000 for concerts, over 18,500 for Hornets games[8] and 16,500 for arena football and has 2,800 club seats and 56 luxury suites.

The Arena is also used as a venue for concerts where it can seat from 7,500 for a half-stage setup to 17,221 for end-stage shows and at the most 17,805 for a center-stage show. For trade shows and conventions the Arena features Script error of space. The ceiling is 65 feet (20 m) to beam and roof, 70 feet (21.5 m) to the top of the arena.

In 2006, the arena installed an LED centerhung video and scoring system from Daktronics out of Brookings, South Dakota. The centerhung installation is made up of two ring displays and eight video displays, as well as scoreboards. This installation is fully integrated with the more than 875 feet of ribbon display technology that was installed in the arena in 2002.[1]

It hosted ArenaBowl XXI in 2007, the 2008 NBA All-Star Game and will host the 2014 NBA All-Star Game, ArenaBowl XXII in July 2008, the 2012 Southeastern Conference men's basketball tournament, and has hosted the first and second rounds of the NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament in 2007 and 2010, and the Southeast Regional of the 2011 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament. On September 9, 2000, the arena hosted the light heavyweight title fight between Roy Jones, Jr. and Eric Harding. Jones won by TKO in the 10th round. The Arena has also hosted the 2004 Women's Final Four and hosted the 2008 NCAA Women's Basketball Tournament South Regionals.

On March 11, 2008 the arena hosted 311 Day 2008. This bi-annual event held in New Orleans is a live concert and fan gathering celebrating the music and unity of rock reggae band 311. 14,000+ fans attended from all 50 states and 12 different countries.

Hurricane KatrinaEdit

Following Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005, medical operations that had previously been housed in the Superdome were moved to the Arena. Medical personnel had been working in an area of the Superdome with poor lighting, leaking ceilings and soggy carpet. The Arena's design was tested in 1996 by CPP, a wind engineering consulting firm, so it fared far better than the Superdome during the storm and was in better condition to house sensitive medical operations. Thus, unlike the Superdome, the Arena reopened to activities only one month after the storm.

EventsEdit

SportsEdit

  • The New Orleans Arena hosted the first league championship game in New Orleans since Hurricane Katrina with ArenaBowl XXI in 2007, the championship game for the Arena Football League. The arena also hosted ArenaBowl XXII the following year and hosted ArenaBowl XXV in 2012.
  • The Hornets played their first game, since the start of the 2005-06 season, at the arena on March 8, 2006, to a sellout crowd of 17,744, as the Los Angeles Lakers defeated the Hornets, 113–107.
  • In March 2007, the PBR brought its Built Ford Tough Series tour for an event in this arena (prior to Hurricane Katrina, the PBR visited the arena for a BFTS event annually from 2000 to 2003; prior to 2003 the tour was known as the Bud Light Cup).
  • In February 2008, the arena hosted the 2008 NBA All-Star Game.[2]
  • In April 2010, the PBR again visited the Arena for a Built Ford Tough Series event.
  • The 2012 SEC Men's Basketball Tournament
  • On February 17, 2013 it hosted the WWE Elimination Chamber Pay-Per-View.

ConcertsEdit

Other infoEdit

  • In the summer of 2008, new Daktronics "see through" shot clocks were installed, replacing the existing box units.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit

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Events and tenants
Preceded by
Charlotte Coliseum
Home of the
New Orleans Hornets

2002 – present
Succeeded by
current
Preceded by
first arena
CenturyTel Center
Home of the
New Orleans VooDoo

2004 – 2005, 2007 – 2008
2011 – present
Succeeded by
last arena
current
Preceded by
Thomas & Mack Center
Host of the
NBA All-Star Game

2008
Succeeded by
US Airways Center
Preceded by
Madison Square Garden
Home of the
Royal Rumble

2001
Succeeded by
Philips Arena
Preceded by
Thomas & Mack Center
US Airways Center
Host of the
ArenaBowl

ArenaBowl XXI - ArenaBowl XXII
ArenaBowl XXV
Succeeded by
Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena
TBA
ca:New Orleans Arena

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