FANDOM


Nebraska Field
LocationN 10th and "T" Streets, Lincoln, Nebraska
Coordinates<span class="geo-dms" title="Maps, aerial photos, and other data for Expression error: Unexpected < operator.°Expression error: Unexpected < operator.Expression error: Unexpected < operator.Expression error: Unexpected >= operator. Expression error: Unexpected < operator.°Expression error: Unexpected < operator.Expression error: Unexpected < operator.Expression error: Unexpected >= operator.">Expression error: Unexpected < operator.°Expression error: Unexpected < operator.Expression error: Unexpected < operator.Expression error: Unexpected >= operator. Expression error: Unexpected < operator.°Expression error: Unexpected < operator.Expression error: Unexpected < operator.Expression error: Unexpected >= operator. / ,
Opened1909
Closed1922
Demolished1923
OwnerUniversity of Nebraska
OperatorUniversity of Nebraska
SurfaceGrass
Capacity16,000 (largest recorded attendance)
Tenants
Nebraska Cornhuskers football (1909-1922)

Nebraska Field hosted the University of Nebraska Cornhuskers football team beginning in 1909 until it was replaced with the new Memorial Stadium, which was built in the same location and opened for the 1923 Nebraska football season. The local portion of North 10th Street was eventually renamed Stadium Drive in the years following the completion of Memorial Stadium.

File:NebraskaFieldLincolnNebraska1921 1.png
Nebraska Field was a stadium located on the northeast corner of the intersection of North 10th Street and North "T" Street, in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Whereas the present playing field at Memorial Stadium is oriented north to south, Nebraska Field had been oriented east to west. The stadium's exact capacity is not recorded, but the largest recorded attendance was 16,000, at the November 30, 1922 game against Notre Dame. This was the last game played at Nebraska Field, and was the last game attended by Nebraska's longtime trainer Jack Best, who had served since the program's inception in 1890. It was also the first of the only two games that the legendary Four Horsemen of Notre Dame would ever lose (the second also to Nebraska in the following season).[1][2][3]

File:NebraskaFieldLincolnNebraska1921 3.png

ReferencesEdit

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.