Template:Infobox bowl series The NCAA Division II Football Championship is an American college football tournament played annually to determine a champion at the NCAA Division II level. It was first held in 1973, as a single-elimination tournament with eight teams. The tournament field has subsequently been expanded three times; in 1988 it became 16 teams, in 2004 it became 24 teams, and in 2016 it became 28 teams.

The National Championship game has been held in seven different cities; Sacramento, California (1973–1975), Wichita Falls, Texas (1976–1977), Longview, Texas (1978), Albuquerque, New Mexico (1979–1980), McAllen, Texas (1981–1985), Florence, Alabama (1986–2013), and Kansas City, Kansas (2014–2017).[1] The 2018 game will be played at the McKinney ISD Stadium and Community Event Center in McKinney, Texas.[2] Since 1994, the games have been broadcast on ESPN.

Prior to 1973, for what was then called the "NCAA College Division," champions were selected by polls conducted at the end of each regular season by two major wire services; in some years the two polls named different number one teams.

NCAA College Division wire service national champions[edit | edit source]

Polls were conducted by the Associated Press (AP) and United Press International (UPI) at the end of each regular season. The AP would poll a panel of writers, while UPI would poll a panel of coaches.

National champions by polling

Year UPI number one AP number one
1958 [[{{{school}}}|Mississippi Southern]] (no poll)
1959 Bowling Green (no poll)
1960 Ohio
1961 Pittsburg State
1962 Southern Miss Florida A&M
1963 Delaware Northern Illinois
1964 Cal State Los Angeles Wittenberg
1965 North Dakota State
1966 San Diego State
1967 San Diego State
1968 San Diego State North Dakota State
1969 North Dakota State
1970 Arkansas State
1971 Delaware
1972 Delaware
1973dagger Tennessee State
1974dagger Louisiana Tech Central Michigan

daggerWhile the NCAA started Division II playoffs in 1973, AP and UPI still conducted their polls these years.

NCAA Division II champions[edit | edit source]

Since 1973, a post-season tournament has been held to determine the Division II Champion. The current format, in use since 2016, features 28 teams. The 28 teams are organized into 4 super-regions of 7 teams each, the top-seeded team in each super-region gets a bye during the first round. The champions of the four super-regions meet in the semi-final round, and the winners of the two semi-final games meet in a neutral-site championship game. Prior to the championship game itself, the game is held at the higher-seeded team's stadium. The championship game has been played at several sites through history, starting in 2018 it will be held at the McKinney Independent School District Stadium, a 12,000 seat facility that opened in August, 2018.

Year Champion[3] Runner-up Score Venue Location Attendance Winning head coach
1973 Louisiana Tech (1) Western Kentucky 34–0 Hughes Stadium Sacramento, California 12,016 Lambright, MaxieMaxie Lambright
1974 Central Michigan (1) Delaware 54–14 Hughes Stadium Sacramento, California 14,137 Kramer, RoyRoy Kramer
1975 Northern Michigan (1) Western Kentucky 16–14 Hughes Stadium Sacramento California 12,017 Krueger, GilGil Krueger
1976 Montana State (1) Akron 24–13 Memorial Stadium Wichita Falls, Texas 13,200 Holland, SonnySonny Holland
1977 Lehigh (1) Jacksonville State 33–0 Memorial Stadium Wichita Falls, Texas 14,114 Whitehead, JohnJohn Whitehead
1978 Eastern Illinois (1) Delaware 10–9 Lobo Stadium Longview, Texas 5,500 Mudra, DarrellDarrell Mudra
1979 Delaware (1) Youngstown State 38–21 University Stadium Albuquerque, New Mexico 4,000 Raymond, TubbyTubby Raymond
1980 Cal Poly SLO (1) Eastern Illinois 21–13 University Stadium Albuquerque, New Mexico 2,056[4] Harper, JoeJoe Harper
1981 Southwest Texas State (1) North Dakota State 42–13 Veterans Memorial Stadium McAllen, Texas 9,415 Wacker, JimJim Wacker
1982 Southwest Texas State (2) UC Davis 34–9 Veterans Memorial Stadium McAllen, Texas 8,000 Wacker, JimJim Wacker
1983 North Dakota State (1) [[{{{school}}}|Central State]] 41–21 Veterans Memorial Stadium McAllen, Texas 5,275 Morton, DonDon Morton
1984 Troy State (1) North Dakota State 18–17 Veterans Memorial Stadium McAllen, Texas 4,500 Gailey, ChanChan Gailey
1985 North Dakota State (2) North Alabama 35–7 Veterans Memorial Stadium McAllen, Texas 6,000 Solomonson, EarleEarle Solomonson
1986 North Dakota State (3) South Dakota 27–7 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 11,506 Solomonson, EarleEarle Solomonson
1987 Troy State (2) Portland State 31–17 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 10,600 Rhoades, RickRick Rhoades
1988 North Dakota State (4) Portland State 35–21 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 6,763 Hager, RockyRocky Hager
1989 Mississippi College Jacksonville State 3–0 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 6,763 Williams, John M.John M. Williams
1990 North Dakota State (5) [[{{{school}}}|Indiana (PA)]] 51–11 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 10,080 Hager, RockyRocky Hager
1991 Pittsburg State (1) Jacksonville State 23–6 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 11,500 Broyles, ChuckChuck Broyles
1992 Jacksonville State (1) Pittsburg State 17–13 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 11,733 Burgess, BillBill Burgess
1993 North Alabama (1) [[{{{school}}}|Indiana (PA)]] 41–34 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 15,361 Wallace, BobbyBobby Wallace
1994 North Alabama (2) [[{{{school}}}|Texas A&M–Kingsville]] 16–10 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 13,526 Wallace, BobbyBobby Wallace
1995 North Alabama (3) Pittsburg State 27–7 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 15,241 Wallace, BobbyBobby Wallace
1996 Northern Colorado (1) Carson–Newman 23–14 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 5,745 Glenn, JoeJoe Glenn
1997 Northern Colorado (2) [[{{{school}}}|New Haven]] 51–0 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 3,352 Glenn, JoeJoe Glenn
1998 Northwest Missouri State (1) Carson–Newman 24–6 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 6,149 Tjeerdsma, MelMel Tjeerdsma
1999 Northwest Missouri State (2) Carson–Newman 58–52 (4OT) Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 8,451 Tjeerdsma, MelMel Tjeerdsma
2000 [[{{{school}}}|Delta State]] (1) [[{{{school}}}|Bloomsburg]] 63–34 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 7,123 Campbell, SteveSteve Campbell
2001 North Dakota (1) Grand Valley State 17–14 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 6,113 Lennon, DaleDale Lennon
2002 Grand Valley State (1) Valdosta State 31–24 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 9,783 Kelly, BrianBrian Kelly
2003 Grand Valley State (2) North Dakota 10–3 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 7,236 Kelly, BrianBrian Kelly
2004 Valdosta State (1) Pittsburg State 36–31 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 8,604 Hatcher, ChrisChris Hatcher
2005 Grand Valley State (3) Northwest Missouri State 21–17 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 6,837 Martin, ChuckChuck Martin
2006 Grand Valley State (4) Northwest Missouri State 17–14 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 7,437 Martin, ChuckChuck Martin
2007 Valdosta State (2) Northwest Missouri State 25–20 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 7,532 Dean, DavidDavid Dean
2008 [[{{{school}}}|Minnesota–Duluth]] (1) Northwest Missouri State 21–14 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 6,215 Nielson, BobBob Nielson
2009 Northwest Missouri State (3) Grand Valley State 30–23 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 6,211 Tjeerdsma, MelMel Tjeerdsma
2010 [[{{{school}}}|Minnesota–Duluth]] (2) [[{{{school}}}|Delta State]] 20–17 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 4,027 Nielson, BobBob Nielson
2011 Pittsburg State (2) Wayne State (MI) 35–21 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 7,276 Beck, TimTim Beck
2012 Valdosta State (3) [[{{{school}}}|Winston-Salem State]] 35–7 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 7,525 Dean, DavidDavid Dean
2013 Northwest Missouri State (4) Lenoir–Rhyne 43–28 Braly Municipal Stadium Florence, Alabama 6,543 Dorrel, AdamAdam Dorrel
2014 CSU–Pueblo (1) [[{{{school}}}|Minnesota State–Mankato]] 13–0 Children's Mercy Park Kansas City, Kansas 6,762 Wristen, JohnJohn Wristen
2015 Northwest Missouri State (5) [[{{{school}}}|Shepherd]] 34–7 Children's Mercy Park Kansas City, Kansas 16,181 Dorrel, AdamAdam Dorrel
2016 Northwest Missouri State (6) North Alabama 29–3 Children's Mercy Park Kansas City, Kansas 9,576[5] Dorrel, AdamAdam Dorrel
2017 Texas A&M–Commerce (1) West Florida 37–27 Children's Mercy Park Kansas City, Kansas 4,259 Carthel, ColbyColby Carthel
2018 Valdosta State (4) [[{{{school}}}|Ferris State]] 49–47 McKinney ISD Stadium McKinney, Texas 4,306 Bell, KerwinKerwin Bell

† Mississippi College's 1989 tournament participation, along with its championship, were vacated by the NCAA Committee on Infractions.

Teams that moved to Division I[edit | edit source]

Most of the participants in early national championship games have moved into Division I, the main catalyst for their moves being the creation of Division I-AA, now the Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS), in 1978. The following Division II title game participants later moved to Division I:

Division I FBS (formerly I-A)

Division I FCS (formerly I-AA)

Postseason bowls[edit | edit source]

Regional bowls[edit | edit source]

From 1964 to 1972, four regional bowl games were played in order to provide postseason action,[3] however these games took place after the AP and UPI polls were completed, therefore these games did not factor in selecting a national champion for the College Division. The bowl games were:

Region 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972
East Tangerine Bowl Boardwalk Bowl
Orlando, Florida Atlantic City, New Jersey
Mideast Grantland Rice Bowl
Murfreesboro, Tennessee Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Midwest Pecan Bowl Pioneer Bowl
Abilene, Texas Arlington, Texas Wichita Falls, Texas
West Camellia Bowl
Sacramento, California

Winners of regional bowls[3]

Year West Midwest Mideast East
1964 Montana State State College (IA) Middle Tennessee State East Carolina
1965 Cal State Los Angeles North Dakota State Ball State / Tennessee State (tie) East Carolina
1966 San Diego State North Dakota Tennessee State Morgan State
1967 San Diego State Texas-Arlington Eastern Kentucky Tennessee-Martin
1968 Humboldt State North Dakota State Louisiana Tech Delaware
1969 North Dakota State Arkansas State East Tennessee State Delaware
1970 North Dakota State Arkansas State Tennessee State Delaware
1971 Boise State Louisiana Tech Tennessee State Delaware
1972 North Dakota Tennessee State Louisiana Tech Massachusetts

Playoff bowls[edit | edit source]

From 1973 to 1977, some of the tournament games were also known by bowl names;

Map[edit | edit source]

Lua error: too many expensive function calls.

See also[edit | edit source]

File:Nwmsu-trophy.jpg

National football championship trophy room at Bearcat Stadium at Northwest Missouri State University. The two trophies in the middle are for the team's 1998 and 1999 national championships. The four trophies on the left are for appearances in the 2005–2008 title games.

References[edit | edit source]

External links[edit | edit source]

Template:NCAA Division II Football Championship

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