FANDOM


Matt Elliott
No. 52     
Guard / Center
Personal information
Date of birth: (1968-10-01) October 1, 1968 (age 51)
Place of birth: Carmel, Indiana
Career information
College: Michigan
NFL Draft: 1992 / Round: 12 / Pick: 336
No regular season or postseason appearances
Career history
* Washington Redskins ( 1992 1993)
Career highlights and awards
Games played     63
Games started     34
Stats at pro-football-reference.com

Eric Matthew "Matt" Elliott (born October 1, 1968) is a former American football player. He played college football as a center and guard for the University of Michigan from 1988 to 1991. He started 35 games at Michigan and was selected as an All-American in 1991. He played professional football as a center and guard in the National Football League (NFL) for the Washington Redskins in 1992 and for the Carolina Panthers from 1995 to 1997.

Early yearsEdit

Elliott was born in Carmel, Indiana, in 1968. He attended Carmel High School.[1]

University of MichiganEdit

Elliott enrolled at the University of Michigan in 1987 and played college football for the Michigan Wolverines football teams from 1988 to 1991.[2]

As a sophomore, Elliott started all 11 games, nine at right guard and two at left guard, for the 1989 Michigan Wolverines football team that compiled a 10-2 record and was ranked #7 in the final AP Poll in Bo Schembechler's last season as head coach at Michigan.[3]

As a junior, Elliott started all 12 games, four at left guard and eight at center, for the 1990 Michigan team that compiled a 9–3 record and was ranked #7 in the final AP Poll.[4] Elliott started the season at left guard, but was moved to center after Steve Everitt broke his foot in Michigan's 45–17 victory over Maryland.[5] Elliott was named the co-MVP of the 1991 Gator Bowl at the conclusion of his junior season.[6]

As a senior, Elliott started all 12 games, eight at left guard and four at center, for the 1991 Michigan team that compiled a 10–2 record, won the Big Ten championship, and was ranked #6 in the final AP Poll.[7] Elliott again started the season at left guard, but moved to center for four games after Steve Everitt suffered a broken jaw in the Notre Dame game on September 14, 1991.[8] At the end of the season, he was selected as a first-team All-American and a first-team All-Big Ten player.[7][9]

Professional footballEdit

Elliott was selected by the Washington Redskins in the 12th round (336th overall pick) of the 1992 NFL Draft.[1] He was the final selection in the final round of the draft, giving him the designation of Mr. Irrelevant.[10] Despite the moniker, Elliott appeared in 16 games, two as a starter, for the Redskins during the 1992 season.[1] He spent the 1993 season on injured reserve, and he was cut during training camp in 1994.[11]

During the 1994 NFL season, Elliott was unable to sign with another NFL team. Instead, he worked as a sideline reporter covering Washington Redskins games and as a color commentator for high school football games in Loudoun County, Virginia.[11]

In 1995, Elliott attempted a comeback and signed with the Carolina Panthers. When he was announced as a starter for the Panthers during the 1995 preseason, Elliott described it as being "a little like a fairy tale" and "a dream come true."[11] He was the Panthers' starting right guard in 14 games during the 1995 season. The following year, he appeared in 16 regular season games, 12 as a starter, as a center and left guard for the 1996 Carolina Panthers team that compiled a 12–4 record, won the NFC West, and lost to the Green Bay Packers in the NFC Championship Game.[1] He was dubbed "Lego Man" in 1996 because he started at center and guard and also played some at tackle.[12] In his final NFL season, Elliott appeared in 16 games, six as a starter, as a left guard for the 1997 Panthers.[1] While playing for Carolina, Elliott founded Fatguy Charities to raise money for children.[10]

In four NFL seasons, Elliott appeared in 63 games, 34 as a starter, for the Redskins and Panthers.[1] He played longer in the NFL than any prior player to bear the "Mr. Irrelevant" moniker.[10]

Later yearsEdit

After retiring as a player, Elliott covered NFL Europe on Fox Sports and college football games on ESPN.[13] As of 2006, Elliott was living in Warsaw, Indiana, with his wife, Kristin. His six-year-old son, Max, was battling leukemia at that time.[10]

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 "Matt Elliott". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. https://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/E/ElliMa20.htm. Retrieved April 7, 2015.
  2. "Michigan Football Roster Database". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. http://bentley.umich.edu/athdept/rosters/football.php. Retrieved April 7, 2015.
  3. "1989 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. http://bentley.umich.edu/athdept/football/fbteam/1989fbt.htm. Retrieved April 7, 2015.
  4. "1990 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. http://bentley.umich.edu/athdept/football/fbteam/1990fbt.htm. Retrieved April 7, 2015.
  5. "Michigan's worries center on injury to Everitt". The Argus-Press: p. 16. October 4, 1990. https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1988&dat=19901004&id=61siAAAAIBAJ&sjid=SK0FAAAAIBAJ&pg=3153,2797773&hl=en.
  6. "Michigan's Bowl Game History: 1991 Gator Bowl". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. http://bentley.umich.edu/athdept/football/bowls/1991gatr.htm. Retrieved April 8, 2015.
  7. 7.0 7.1 "1991 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. http://bentley.umich.edu/athdept/football/fbteam/1991fbt.htm. Retrieved April 7, 2015.
  8. "Notre Dame". The Michigan Daily: p. 4. September 16, 1991. https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=2706&dat=19910916&id=PP1JAAAAIBAJ&sjid=Nh4NAAAAIBAJ&pg=1149,911917&hl=en.
  9. "Wolverine All-Americans". The Argus-Press: p. Supplement-2. October 4, 1992. https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1988&dat=19921004&id=3ToiAAAAIBAJ&sjid=sqkFAAAAIBAJ&pg=1499,3004535&hl=en.
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 Andrea Adelson (April 24, 2006). "Son's battle now makes Elliott Mr. Relevant". USA Today (AP story). http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/sports/football/nfl/2006-04-24-elliott-son-feature_x.htm.
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 "Elliott get a chance to thank the Panthers". Herald-Journal, Spartanburg, SC: p. B4. August 4, 1994. https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1876&dat=19950804&id=UFMgAAAAIBAJ&sjid=U88EAAAAIBAJ&pg=6530,596685&hl=en.
  12. "Castoffs and retreads are at the heart of upstart Panthers". January 12, 1997. p. 2C. https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1454&dat=19970112&id=WrAsAAAAIBAJ&sjid=RhUEAAAAIBAJ&pg=3536,3816713&hl=en.
  13. "Matt Elliott". MVP Sports Media Training. http://www.sportsmediatraining.com/mvp-team/advisory-board/matt-elliott. Retrieved April 8, 2015.
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.