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Mark Harmon

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==Early life==
 
==Early life==
Harmon was born in [[Burbank, California]], the youngest of three children. His parents were [[Heisman Trophy]]–winning football player and broadcaster [[Tom Harmon]] and actress, model, and artist [[Elyse Knox]] ([[née]] Elsie Lillian Kornbrath).<ref name="lifemagazine">{{cite news|title=The Son of 'Ole 98'|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=8VQEAAAAMBAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false|date=November 10, 1972|work=[[Life (magazine)|Life]]|pages=72–4}}</ref><!--NOTE: Not the daughter of U.S. Navy Secretary [[Frank Knox]], as many modern sources have stated).<ref>the daughter of Frederick and Elizabeth Kornbrath, 1920 U.S. Census, Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut</ref>--> Harmon has two older sisters, the late actress and painter [[Kristin Nelson]], who was divorced from the late singer [[Rick Nelson]], and actress and model [[Kelly Harmon]], formerly married to car magnate [[John DeLorean]]. His maternal grandparents were [[Austrians|Austrian]] immigrants.<ref>https://www.cbs.com/shows/the_talk/topics/show/1007553/</ref>
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Harmon was born in [[Burbank, California]], the youngest of three children. His parents were [[Heisman Trophy]]–winning football player and broadcaster [[Tom Harmon]] and actress and artist [[Elyse Knox]] ([[née]] Elsie Lillian Kornbrath).<ref name="lifemagazine">{{cite news|title=The Son of 'Ole 98'|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=8VQEAAAAMBAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false|date=November 10, 1972|work=[[Life (magazine)|Life]]|pages=72–4}}</ref><!--NOTE: Not the daughter of U.S. Navy Secretary [[Frank Knox]], as many modern sources have stated).<ref>the daughter of Frederick and Elizabeth Kornbrath, 1920 U.S. Census, Hartford, Hartford County, Connecticut</ref>--> Harmon has two older sisters, the late actress and painter [[Kristin Nelson]], who was divorced from the late singer [[Rick Nelson]], and actress and model [[Kelly Harmon]], formerly married to car magnate [[John DeLorean]]. His maternal grandparents were [[Austrians|Austrian]] immigrants.<ref>https://www.cbs.com/shows/the_talk/topics/show/1007553/</ref>
   
 
===College football===
 
===College football===
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During the mid to late 1970s, Harmon made guest appearances on TV series such as ''[[Laverne & Shirley]]'', ''[[Delvecchio_(TV_series)|Delvecchio]]'', ''[[The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries]]'' and had supporting roles in the feature films ''[[Comes a Horseman]]'' (1978) and ''[[Beyond the Poseidon Adventure]]'' (1979). He then landed a co-starring role on the 1979 action series ''[[240-Robert]]'' as Deputy Dwayne Thibideaux. The series centered around the missions of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department Emergency Services Detail, but was also short-lived.<ref>{{Cite web|url=https://www.metv.com/stories/do-you-remember-the-show-240-robert|title=Do you remember the show|website=Me-TV Network|access-date=2018-09-05}}</ref>
 
During the mid to late 1970s, Harmon made guest appearances on TV series such as ''[[Laverne & Shirley]]'', ''[[Delvecchio_(TV_series)|Delvecchio]]'', ''[[The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries]]'' and had supporting roles in the feature films ''[[Comes a Horseman]]'' (1978) and ''[[Beyond the Poseidon Adventure]]'' (1979). He then landed a co-starring role on the 1979 action series ''[[240-Robert]]'' as Deputy Dwayne Thibideaux. The series centered around the missions of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department Emergency Services Detail, but was also short-lived.<ref>{{Cite web|url=https://www.metv.com/stories/do-you-remember-the-show-240-robert|title=Do you remember the show|website=Me-TV Network|access-date=2018-09-05}}</ref>
   
In 1980, Harmon gained a regular role in the prime time soap opera ''[[Flamingo Road (TV series)|Flamingo Road]]'', in which he played Fielding Carlisle, the husband of [[Morgan Fairchild]]'s character. Despite initially good ratings, the series was canceled after two seasons. Following its cancellation, he landed the role of Dr. Robert Caldwell on the series ''[[St. Elsewhere]]'' in 1983. Harmon appeared in the show for almost three seasons before leaving in early 1986 when his character contracted [[HIV]] through unprotected intercourse, one of the first instances where a major recurring television character contracted the virus (the character's subsequent off-screen death from [[AIDS]] would be mentioned two years later). In the mid-1980s, Harmon also became the spokesperson for [[Coors Brewing Company|Coors Regular beer]], appearing in television commercials for them.<ref name="coors">{{cite news| url=https://www.nytimes.com/1987/03/20/business/advertising-coors-beer-takes-on-new-york.html?pagewanted=all | work=[[The New York Times]]| title = Advertising; Coors Beer Takes On New York| first=Philip H.| last=Dougherty| date=20 March 1987 | accessdate=2012-02-03}}</ref>
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In 1980, Harmon gained a regular role in the prime time soap opera ''[[Flamingo Road (TV series)|Flamingo Road]]'', in which he played Fielding Carlisle, the husband of [[Morgan Fairchild]]'s character. Despite initially good ratings, the series was canceled after two seasons. Following its cancellation, he landed the role of Dr. Robert Caldwell on the prestigious [[NBC]] Emmy-winning series ''[[St. Elsewhere]]'' in 1983. Harmon appeared in the show for almost three seasons before leaving in early 1986 when his character contracted [[HIV]] through unprotected intercourse, one of the first instances where a major recurring television character contracted the virus (the character's subsequent off-screen death from [[AIDS]] would be mentioned two years later). In the mid-1980s, Harmon also became the spokesperson for [[Coors Brewing Company|Coors Regular beer]], appearing in television commercials for them.<ref name="coors">{{cite news| url=https://www.nytimes.com/1987/03/20/business/advertising-coors-beer-takes-on-new-york.html?pagewanted=all | work=[[The New York Times]]| title = Advertising; Coors Beer Takes On New York| first=Philip H.| last=Dougherty| date=20 March 1987 | accessdate=2012-02-03}}</ref>
   
 
Harmon's career reached several other high points in 1986. In January, he was named ''[[People (magazine)|People]]'' magazine's [[Sexiest Man Alive]].<ref>{{Cite web|title = All the Sexiest Man Alive Covers|url = http://www.people.com/people/package/gallery/0,,20315920_20154495_20349086,00.html#20349092 |work=[[People (magazine)|People]] |accessdate = 2015-07-20}}</ref> Following his departure from ''St. Elsewhere'' in February, he played the lead in the TV movies ''[[Prince of Bel Air]]'', co-starring with [[Kirstie Alley]], and ''[[The Deliberate Stranger]]'', in which he portrayed the real-life [[serial killer]] [[Ted Bundy]]. With his career blossoming, he played a role in the 1986 theatrical film ''[[Let's Get Harry]]'' and the lead role in the 1987 comedy ''[[Summer School (1987 film)|Summer School]]'', again co-starring with [[Kirstie Alley]] and alongside future ''[[JAG (TV series)|JAG]]'' and ''[[NCIS (TV series)|NCIS]]'' alum [[Patrick Labyorteaux]]. Returning briefly to episodic television in 1987, Harmon had a limited engagement on the series ''[[Moonlighting (TV series)|Moonlighting]]'', playing [[Cybill Shepherd]]'s love interest Sam Crawford for four episodes. He then starred in the 1987 TV movie ''After the Promise''. In 1988, he co-starred with [[Sean Connery]] and [[Meg Ryan]] in the 1988 feature film ''[[The Presidio (film)|The Presidio]]'', and also opposite [[Jodie Foster]] in the film ''[[Stealing Home]]''. Despite several high-profile roles, Harmon's film career never gathered momentum and, after a muted reception to his 1989 comedy ''[[Worth Winning]]'', he returned to television, appearing in various television movies.{{Citation needed|date=August 2018}}
 
Harmon's career reached several other high points in 1986. In January, he was named ''[[People (magazine)|People]]'' magazine's [[Sexiest Man Alive]].<ref>{{Cite web|title = All the Sexiest Man Alive Covers|url = http://www.people.com/people/package/gallery/0,,20315920_20154495_20349086,00.html#20349092 |work=[[People (magazine)|People]] |accessdate = 2015-07-20}}</ref> Following his departure from ''St. Elsewhere'' in February, he played the lead in the TV movies ''[[Prince of Bel Air]]'', co-starring with [[Kirstie Alley]], and ''[[The Deliberate Stranger]]'', in which he portrayed the real-life [[serial killer]] [[Ted Bundy]]. With his career blossoming, he played a role in the 1986 theatrical film ''[[Let's Get Harry]]'' and the lead role in the 1987 comedy ''[[Summer School (1987 film)|Summer School]]'', again co-starring with [[Kirstie Alley]] and alongside future ''[[JAG (TV series)|JAG]]'' and ''[[NCIS (TV series)|NCIS]]'' alum [[Patrick Labyorteaux]]. Returning briefly to episodic television in 1987, Harmon had a limited engagement on the series ''[[Moonlighting (TV series)|Moonlighting]]'', playing [[Cybill Shepherd]]'s love interest Sam Crawford for four episodes. He then starred in the 1987 TV movie ''After the Promise''. In 1988, he co-starred with [[Sean Connery]] and [[Meg Ryan]] in the 1988 feature film ''[[The Presidio (film)|The Presidio]]'', and also opposite [[Jodie Foster]] in the film ''[[Stealing Home]]''. Despite several high-profile roles, Harmon's film career never gathered momentum and, after a muted reception to his 1989 comedy ''[[Worth Winning]]'', he returned to television, appearing in various television movies.{{Citation needed|date=August 2018}}
   
Harmon's next regular television role would be as Chicago police detective Dickie Cobb for two seasons (1991–1993) on the [[NBC]] series ''[[Reasonable Doubts]]''. In 1993, he appeared in one episode in the role of a [[rodeo]] clown on the [[CBS]] comedy/western series ''[[Harts of the West]]'' with future castmate [[Sean Murray (actor)|Sean Murray]], who plays McGee on ''NCIS''.<ref>{{Cite news|url=https://www.newspapers.com/clip/34747576/the_times_leader/|title=Hollywood stars ride with 'Harts of the West'|date=September 6, 1993|work=The Times Leader|access-date=August 10, 2019|department=Television|location=Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania|page=6B|quote=Mark Harmon ... appears as ex-rodeo star Sunset Sam in the second episode. Harmon plays a down-on-his-luck. once-champion rider who teaches the Harts a few lessons about taming the West ... Nevertheless Hart, wife Alison ... and their three children Zane (Sean Murray), L'Amour (Meghann Haldeman) and Duke (Nathan Watt), all named after heroes of the old West....|via=Newspapers.com}}</ref>
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Harmon's next regular television role would be as Chicago police detective Dickie Cobb for two seasons (1991–1993) on the [[NBC]] series ''[[Reasonable Doubts]]''. In 1993, he appeared in one episode in the role of a [[rodeo]] clown on the [[CBS]] comedy/western series ''[[Harts of the West]]'' with future castmate [[Sean Murray (actor)|Sean Murray]], who plays McGee on ''NCIS''.{{Citation needed|date=August 2018}}
   
In 1995, Harmon starred in the [[American Broadcasting Company|ABC]] series ''[[Charlie Grace (TV series)|Charlie Grace]]'', in which he portrayed a private investigator.<ref>{{Cite news|url=https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/tv/1995/10/01/charlie-grace-under-fire/d5cc2e96-7f5e-43b5-bbe4-5ecf0ffb8f55/|title='''Charlie Grace'', Under Fire|last=Hill|first=Michael E.|date=1995-10-01|work=Washington Post|access-date=2018-08-25|language=en-US|issn=0190-8286}}</ref> The series lasted only one season,<ref>{{Cite web|url=https://triblive.com/aande/moreaande/7803863-74/harmon-galavant-vhs|title=Pop Culture Q&A: Earlier on, Mark Harmon played a P.I.|last=Heldenfels|first=Rich|date=February 22, 2015|website=Pittsburgh Tribune-Review|language=en-US|access-date=2018-08-25}}</ref> after which he returned to ensemble medical shows on the series ''[[Chicago Hope]]'', in which he played Dr. Jack McNeil from 1996 to 2000.<ref>{{Cite news|url=https://www.newspapers.com/clip/34747896/the_morning_star/|title=Harmon stars in 'Hope'|date=February 11, 2000|work=The Morning Star|access-date=August 10, 2019|publisher=|location=Vernon, British Columbia|page=48|via=Newspapers.com}}</ref> He also portrayed astronaut [[Wally Schirra]] in one episode of the 1998 mini-series ''[[From the Earth to the Moon (miniseries)|From the Earth to the Moon]]''.<ref>{{Cite news|url=https://variety.com/1998/film/reviews/from-the-earth-to-the-moon-2-1200453500/|title=From the Earth to the Moon|last=Richmond|first=Ray|date=April 1, 1998|work=Variety|access-date=August 24, 2018|language=en-US}}</ref>
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In 1995, Harmon starred in the [[American Broadcasting Company|ABC]] series ''[[Charlie Grace (TV series)|Charlie Grace]]'', in which he portrayed a private investigator.<ref>{{Cite news|url=https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/tv/1995/10/01/charlie-grace-under-fire/d5cc2e96-7f5e-43b5-bbe4-5ecf0ffb8f55/|title='''Charlie Grace'', Under Fire|last=Hill|first=Michael E.|date=1995-10-01|work=Washington Post|access-date=2018-08-25|language=en-US|issn=0190-8286}}</ref> The series lasted only one season,<ref>{{Cite web|url=https://triblive.com/aande/moreaande/7803863-74/harmon-galavant-vhs|title=Pop Culture Q&A: Earlier on, Mark Harmon played a P.I.|last=Heldenfels|first=Rich|date=February 22, 2015|website=Pittsburgh Tribune-Review|language=en-US|access-date=2018-08-25}}</ref> after which he returned to ensemble medical shows on the series ''[[Chicago Hope]]'', in which he played Dr. Jack McNeil from 1996 to 2000.{{Citation needed|date=August 2018}} He also portrayed astronaut [[Wally Schirra]] in one episode of the 1998 mini-series ''[[From the Earth to the Moon (miniseries)|From the Earth to the Moon]]''.<ref>{{Cite news|url=https://variety.com/1998/film/reviews/from-the-earth-to-the-moon-2-1200453500/|title=From the Earth to the Moon|last=Richmond|first=Ray|date=April 1, 1998|work=Variety|access-date=August 24, 2018|language=en-US}}</ref>
   
 
===''NCIS''===
 
===''NCIS''===
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Harmon has been married to actress [[Pam Dawber]] since March 21, 1987.<ref name="usa"/> The couple have two sons: Sean Thomas Harmon (born April 25, 1988, who played a young Gibbs in five ''NCIS'' episodes), and Ty Christian Harmon (born June 25, 1992). They maintain a low profile and rarely appear in public with their children. Harmon was the brother-in-law of [[Ricky Nelson]] and [[John DeLorean]] and is the uncle of actress [[Tracy Nelson (actress)|Tracy Nelson]] and singers [[Matthew Nelson|Matthew]] and [[Gunnar Nelson (musician)|Gunnar Nelson]] of the rock duo [[Nelson (band)|Nelson]].{{Citation needed|date=August 2018}}
 
Harmon has been married to actress [[Pam Dawber]] since March 21, 1987.<ref name="usa"/> The couple have two sons: Sean Thomas Harmon (born April 25, 1988, who played a young Gibbs in five ''NCIS'' episodes), and Ty Christian Harmon (born June 25, 1992). They maintain a low profile and rarely appear in public with their children. Harmon was the brother-in-law of [[Ricky Nelson]] and [[John DeLorean]] and is the uncle of actress [[Tracy Nelson (actress)|Tracy Nelson]] and singers [[Matthew Nelson|Matthew]] and [[Gunnar Nelson (musician)|Gunnar Nelson]] of the rock duo [[Nelson (band)|Nelson]].{{Citation needed|date=August 2018}}
   
In 1987, Harmon filed for custody of his nephew Sam on the grounds that his sister, [[Kristin Nelson]], was incapable of good parenting. Sam's psychiatrist testified that the thirteen-year-old boy depicted his mother as a dragon and complained about her mood swings and how she prevented him from being with his siblings. Harmon later dropped the custody bid.<ref>{{cite book |author=Bashe, Philip |year=1992 |title=Teenage Idol, Travelin' Man: The Complete Biography of Rick Nelson |location=New York |publisher=Hyperion |isbn=1-56282-969-6 |url=https://archive.org/details/teenageidoltrave00bash }}</ref><ref>{{cite book |author=Selvin, Joel |year=1990 |title=Ricky Nelson: Idol for a Generation |publisher=Contemporary Books, Inc. |isbn=0-8092-4187-0 |url=https://archive.org/details/rickynelsonidolf00selv }}</ref>
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In 1987, Harmon filed for custody of his nephew Sam on the grounds that his sister, [[Kristin Nelson]], was incapable of good parenting. Sam's psychiatrist testified that the thirteen-year-old boy depicted his mother as a dragon and complained about her mood swings and how she prevented him from being with his siblings. Harmon later dropped the custody bid.<ref>{{cite book |author=Bashe, Philip |year=1992|title=Teenage Idol, Travelin' Man: The Complete Biography of Rick Nelson |location=New York |publisher=Hyperion |isbn=1-56282-969-6}}</ref><ref>{{cite book |author=Selvin, Joel |year=1990 |title=Ricky Nelson: Idol for a Generation |publisher=Contemporary Books, Inc. |isbn=0-8092-4187-0}}</ref>
   
 
In 1988, Harmon was part owner of a [[minor league baseball]] team, the [[San Bernardino Spirit]], the same season [[Ken Griffey, Jr.]] played for the team before his major league call-up to the [[Seattle Mariners]] the next season. Harmon used the team and their home field, [[Fiscalini Field]], for the opening and closing scenes of the film in which he was starring, ''[[Stealing Home]]''.<ref>{{cite news |last= Brock|first= Mullins|date= August 21, 1988|title= League's Ownership Includes Some Heavy Hitters|url= http://articles.latimes.com/1988-08-21/sports/sp-1420_1_california-league |newspaper=[[Los Angeles Times]] |accessdate=2014-11-13}}</ref>
 
In 1988, Harmon was part owner of a [[minor league baseball]] team, the [[San Bernardino Spirit]], the same season [[Ken Griffey, Jr.]] played for the team before his major league call-up to the [[Seattle Mariners]] the next season. Harmon used the team and their home field, [[Fiscalini Field]], for the opening and closing scenes of the film in which he was starring, ''[[Stealing Home]]''.<ref>{{cite news |last= Brock|first= Mullins|date= August 21, 1988|title= League's Ownership Includes Some Heavy Hitters|url= http://articles.latimes.com/1988-08-21/sports/sp-1420_1_california-league |newspaper=[[Los Angeles Times]] |accessdate=2014-11-13}}</ref>
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