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Marchmont Schwartz
File:Marchmont Schwartz.jpg
Sport(s)Football
Biographical details
Born(1909-03-20)March 20, 1909
New Orleans, Louisiana
DiedApril 18, 1991(1991-04-18) (aged 82)
Danville, California
Playing career
1929–1931Notre Dame
Position(s)Halfback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1932–1933
1934
1935–1939
1940–1941
1942–1950
Notre Dame (assistant)
Chicago (assistant)
Creighton
Stanford (backfield)
Stanford
Head coaching record
Overall47–50–6
Bowls1–0
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 MVC (1936)
Awards
All-American, 1930
All-American, 1931
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1974 (profile)

Marchmont H. "Marchy" Schwartz (March 20, 1909 – April 18, 1991) was an American football player and coach. He played college football at the University of Notre Dame from 1929 to 1931, and was a two-time All-American at halfback. Schwartz served as the head football coach at Creighton University from 1935 to 1939 and at Stanford University from 1942 to 1950, compiling a career college football coaching record of 47–50–6; Stanford, like may other universities, suspended football during World War II. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1974.

Early life and playing careerEdit

Schwartz was of Jewish heritage,[1] and was a graduate of Saint Stanislaus College prep school in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. From 1929 to 1930, he led Notre Dame, coached by Knute Rockne, to a 19–0 record and consecutive national championships. In a game against Carnegie Tech in 1931, he rushed for 188 yards, including touchdown runs of 58 and 60 yards.

Coaching careerEdit

Schwartz served as an assistant football coach at Notre Dame from 1932 to 1933 under Heartley Anderson, and at the University of Chicago in 1934 under Clark Shaughnessy.[2] In 1940, Shaughnessy hired Schwartz as Stanford's backfield coach. He helped coach the 1940 "Wow Boys" that recorded a perfect season and won the 1941 Rose Bowl.[3]

DeathEdit

Schwartz died on April 18, 1991 in Danville, California, aged 82.[4]

Head coaching recordEdit

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs AP#
Creighton Bluejays (Missouri Valley Conference) (1935–1939)
1935 Creighton 3–5–1 2–2–1 3rd
1936 Creighton 4–4 3–0 T–1st
1937 Creighton 2–7 0–3 7th
1938 Creighton 6–1–1 1–0–1 3rd
1939 Creighton 4–5 2–4 6th
Creighton: 19–22–2 8–11–2
Stanford Indians (Pacific Coast Conference) (1942–1950)
1942 Stanford 6–4 5–2 3rd 12
1943 No team—World War II
1943 No team—World War II
1944 No team—World War II
1945 Stanford 6–3–1 3–3–1 5th
1947 Stanford 0–9 0–7 10th
1948 Stanford 4–6 3–4 5th
1949 Stanford 7–3–1 4–2 T–3rd W Pineapple
1950 Stanford 5–3–2 2–2–2 T–4th
Stanford: 28–28–4
Total: 47–50–6
#Rankings from final AP Poll.

ReferencesEdit

  1. [1]
  2. Marchmont Schwartz is Shaughnessy's Aid, Associated Press, January 18, 1934.
  3. NEA Staff, Stanford Alumni Change Tune, The Register-Guard, p. 16, December 22, 1940.
  4. AP (April 20, 1991). "Marchmont Schwartz Football Coach, 82". The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/1991/04/20/obituaries/marchmont-schwartz-football-coach-82.html. Retrieved April 3, 2011.

External linksEdit

Template:Creighton Bluejays football coach navbox


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