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University of Florida
Athletic Hall of Fame
Awarded forExcellence in college sports
Presented byUniversity of Florida Lettermen's Association (F Club)
DateApril 6, 2012 (2012-04-06) (last induction)
LocationGainesville, Florida
CountryUnited States
RewardHonorary
Official websitehttp://www.gatorfclub.org/hof/

This List of University of Florida Athletic Hall of Fame members includes over 270 former Florida Gators athletes who represented the University of Florida in one or more intercollegiate sports and were recognized as "Gator Greats" for their athletic excellence during their college sports careers. The University of Florida, located in Gainesville, Florida, is a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC), and fields twenty-one intercollegiate sports teams, all of which compete in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).

Gator Greats are listed below in alphabetical order within each sport. Those listed include athletes from nine men's sports and nine women's sports. This list also includes "Distinguished Letterwinners," who are former Gators athletes who achieved distinction after graduation, as athletic coaches or administrators, professional athletes, or in public service or other career activities; and "Honorary Letterwinners," who were not former Gators athletes, but who distinguished themselves by their significant contributions to the success of the Florida Gators sports teams, including former championship Gators coaches. Distinguished Letterwinners and Honorary Letterwinners are listed below in alphabetical order in separate sections near the end of this article.

The Hall of Fame's Class of 2012 included Gators Greats Alex Brown (football), Hazel Clark-Riley (women's track and field), Kristen Guise (women's gymnastics), Udonis Haslem (men's basketball), Jeff Morrison (men's tennis), Stephanie Nickitas (women's tennis), and Abby Wambach (women's soccer), as well as Distinguished Letterwinner Larry Travis (football). They were inducted at an awards banquet on April 6, 2012.[1] The Class of 2013 will include Gator Greats Jeff Davis (wrestling), Josh Fogg (baseball), Rex Grossman (football), Riko Higashio (women's golf), Heather Mitts (women's soccer), Mike Pearson (football), and Chrissy Van Fleet (women's gymnastics); Honorary Letterwinner Ernestine Weaver (women's gymnastics coach); and Distinguished Letterwinner Larry Morris (football). They will be inducted on April 5, 2013.[2]

Football Edit

The following Gator Greats are former members of the Florida Gators football team:

Name Sport Years Accomplishments
Frederic M. Abbott Football 1970–1972 As the Gators' senior team captain in 1972, linebacker Fred Abbott was a first-team All-SEC selection, an Associated Press All-American, and the recipient of the team's Fergie Ferguson Award. Remarkably, he had switched from playing offensive guard as a junior to playing middle linebacker as a senior.[3] The Minnesota Vikings picked Abbott in the 1973 NFL Draft.
Carlos Alvarez Football 1969–1971 Wide receiver Carlos Alvarez was one of the 1969 Gators' second-year stars known as the "Super Sophs," and set single season NCAA receiving records in virtually every category. He was recognized as a first team All-SEC selection and a consensus first-team All-American.[3] Alvarez was also a three-time Academic All-American, and is a member of the Academic All-American Hall of Fame and the College Football Hall of Fame.
C. Neal Anderson Football 1982–1985 Running back Neal Anderson was a first-team All-SEC selection, and a two-time All-American. In his four years as a Gator, he had fourteen games with 100 yards or more rushing; 639 carries for 3,234 yards rushing and thirty touchdowns; forty-nine receptions for 525 yards receiving and two touchdowns; and ninety-seven yards passing.[3] The Chicago Bears selected Anderson in the first round of the 1986 NFL Draft.[4]
Reidel C. Anthony Football 1994–1996 As a junior wide receiver, Reidel Anthony was a first-team All-SEC selection and a consensus first-team All-American. He played a key role in the Gators' 12–1 national championship season in 1996, catching seventy-two passes to lead the SEC with 1,293 yards, and setting a new SEC regular season record with eighteen touchdown catches.[3] The Tampa Buccaneers drafted Anthony in the first round of the 1997 NFL Draft.[5]
Raymond L. "Trace"
Armstrong, III
Football 1989 Trace Armstrong was a rare senior transfer who played only a single season at defensive tackle for the Gators, but it was a memorable one, as he set a new Gators single-season record by making nineteen tackles for a loss, including seven quarterback sacks. Armstrong was recognized as a first-team All-SEC selection and a first-team All-American.[3] The Chicago Bears picked him in the first round of the 1990 NFL Draft.[6]
John Barrow Football 1954–1956 John Barrow was a two-way offensive and defensive lineman for the Gators in the mid-1950s. As a senior, he was recognized as first-team All-SEC selection and a first-team All-American.[3] Drafted by the NFL's Detroit Lions, he chose to play in the CFL instead, and was a thirteen-time CFL All-Star and a member of four Grey Cup championship teams. He is a member of the Canadian Football Hall of Fame.[7]
James E. Beaver Football 1959–1961 Offensive lineman Jim Beaver was a two-time All-SEC selection, a senior team captain, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award.[3] He was drafted by the NFL's Philadelphia Eagles and the AFL's Buffalo Bills in 1963.
Jack H. Beckwith Football 1933–1935 Jack Beckwith was a standout halfback and fullback for the Gators from 1933 to 1935.[3] As a sophomore in 1933, Beckwith turned in a memorable rushing and punting performance against Auburn that was the difference in the Gators' 14–7 homecoming victory.
Douglas R. Belden Basketball
Baseball
Football
1944–1945
1945, 1947–1948
1946–1948
Doug Belden was a versatile three-sport letterman during a college career interrupted by military service. In football, he was the Gators' leading passer in 1947 and 1948.[3] He later played three seasons as a quarterback for the Saskatchewan Roughriders of the CFL.
Kerwin D. Bell Football 1984–1987 Quarterback Kerwin Bell was a walk-on player who was eighth on the depth chart as a freshman. He subsequently earned an athletic scholarship, the starting position, a first-team All-SEC selection and All-American honors. In 1984 and 1985, he led the Gators to the their first two SEC first-place finishes. Bell finished his college career with 549 completions for 7,585 yards and fifty-six touchdowns.[3]
Bruce Bennett Football 1963–1965 As a senior team captain in 1965, defensive back Bruce Bennett was a first-team All-SEC selection and a United Press International first-team All-American, and led the Gators to their first-ever major bowl game. His thirteen career interceptions set a new Gators team record.[3] After college, Bennett played for the CFL's Saskatchewan Roughriders for seven seasons, including their 1966 Grey Cup championship team.[8]
Leroy R. "Red" Bethea Football 1928–1930 As a senior team captain in 1930, Red Bethea rushed for 218 yards against the University of Chicago Maroons football team—still the third highest single-game rushing total in Gators history.[3]
Ernest J. "Goof" Bowyer Football 1926–1928 Goof Bowyer was the senior team captain of the great Florida Gators football team of 1928.[3] Bowyer's '28 Gators set a new national single-season scoring record of 336 points and finished 8–1—the best season win-loss record in the first fifty-four years of Gators football.
Scot E. Brantley Football
Baseball
1976–1979
1977
Linebacker Scot Brantley was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection and twice received All-American honors. Remembered for his physical play, he led the Gators in tackles during two seasons, and his career total of 467 tackles still ranks second in the Gators' records book.[3] Brantley's senior season was cut short by a severe concussion, but he later had a successful eight-year NFL career with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.[9]
Alex J. Brown Football 1998–2001 Alex Brown was a defensive end and a member of the Gators' 2000 SEC championship team. He was a three-time first-team All-SEC selection, and a consensus first-team All-American. In four years as a Gator, Brown totaled 161 tackles, with forty-seven tackles for a loss and thirty-three quarterback sacks—still the best in Gators team history.[3] Brown was drafted by the Chicago Bears and enjoyed a nine-year NFL career.[10]
Lomas Brown, Jr. Football 1981–1984 Lomas Brown anchored the "Great Wall of Florida" offensive line and paved the way for the Gators' first undefeated SEC season in 1984. He was a first-team All-SEC selection, consensus first-team All-American, and the SEC's Jacobs Blocking Trophy winner.[3] The Detroit Lions selected him in the first round of the 1985 NFL Draft, and he received numerous Pro Bowl and All-Pro honors during his eighteen-year NFL career.[11]
Carl L. Brumbaugh Football 1927–1928 Carl Brumbaugh was a quarterback and halfback who was a member of the 1928 Gators' "Phantom Four" backfield that set a new single-season national scoring record off 336 points, while posting an 8–1 win-loss record—the best record in Gators history until that time. Brumbaugh played professionally for the Chicago Bears and was a member of two of the Bears' NFL championship teams.[12]
Glenn S. Cameron Football 1971–1974 Linebacker Glenn Cameron was a first-team All-SEC selection and an Associated Press All-American.[3] The Cincinnati Bengals selected him in the first round of the 1975 NFL Draft, and he played 159 games for the Bengals during his eleven NFL seasons—including Super Bowl XVI.[13] After Cameron retired from professional football, he returned to the University of Florida and earned a law degree.
Kevin L. Carter Football 1991–1994 Kevin Carter was a standout defensive end, and was a member of the Gators' first three SEC championship football teams in 1991, 1993 and 1994. As a senior, he was a first-team All-SEC selection, a consensus first-team All-American, and was recognized by 'Football News as its Defensive Player of the Year.[3] The St. Louis Rams selected Carter in the first round of the 1995 NFL Draft, and he played fourteen NFL seasons.[14]
William C. Carr, III Football 1964–1966 Center Bill Carr started thirty-two consecutive games in his three seasons on the Gators varsity. As a senior in 1966, he was a first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, and the offensive team captain.[3] He and his roommate, quarterback Steve Spurrier, led the Gators to their first-ever major bowl game victory in the 1967 Orange Bowl. Carr later served as the athletic director for the Florida Gators and Houston Cougars.
Richard J. Casares Football
Basketball
1951–1953
1952–1953
Halfback Rick Casares was the Gators' leading rusher and an All-SEC selection in 1952, spurring the team to an 8–3 season and their first-ever bowl game. Casares, who was also a placekicker, scored a touchdown and two extra points in the team's 14–13 Gator Bowl win.[3] Casares was drafted by the Chicago Bears and played twelve NFL seasons.[15] He became the Bears' leading rusher until later eclipsed by Walter Payton.
Charles A. Casey Football
Baseball
1963–1965
1965
Wide receiver Charley Casey was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award. Casey had six games with 100 or more yards receiving, led the team in receiving yardage in 1964 and 1965, and finished his college career as the leading receiver in SEC history.[3] He was drafted by the Atlanta Falcons.
Rainey Cawthon Football 1927–1929 Rainey Cawthon was a member of the 1928 Gators' "Phantom Four" backfield that led the team in setting a new national single-season scoring record of 336 points, while compiling an 8–1 win-loss record—the best in the first five decades of Gators football.
Donald G. Chandler Football 1954–1955 Don Chandler was a junior transfer who played halfback, punter and placekicker. As a senior in 1955, Chandler led all major college punters with an average kick of 44.3 yards, narrowly beating out Earl Morrall. Memorably, he booted a 76-yard punt in 1955—still tied for the second longest punt in Gators history.[3] Chandler was drafted by the New York Giants, and played in twelve NFL seasons.[16]
Wesley S. Chandler Football 1974–1977 Wide receiver Wes Chandler was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, a two-time first-team All-American, a first-team Academic All-American, the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award, and a senior team captain.[3] The New Orleans Saints made him the third overall pick in the 1978 NFL Draft, and he compiled 8,966 receiving yards and sixty-seven touchdowns in eleven NFL seasons.[17]
William W. Chase Football 1933–1935 Billy Chase was an All-SEC selection and the senior team captain in 1935. Memorably, he returned a kickoff ninety-eight yards against Ole Miss in 1934.[3]
Hagood Clarke, III Football 1961–1963 Hagood Clarke was a walk-on defensive back, punter and punt returner. He led the Gators in punt return yardage in 1961 and 1962, booted 46 punts for 1,884 yards in 1962, and was the recipient of the Fergie Ferguson Award in 1963.[3] The Buffalo Bills drafted him in 1964, and he played five years in the AFL—including the Bills' 1964 and 1965 AFL championship seasons. He earned All-AFL and AFL All-Star honors.[18]
A. Cris Collinsworth Football 1977–1980 Recruited as an option quarterback, he achieved his greatest success as a converted wide receiver: three-time first-team All-SEC selection, first-team All-American, first-team Academic All-American, and senior team captain.[3] The Cincinnati Bengals picked him in the second round of the 1981 NFL Draft, and he received numerous All-Pro and Pro Bowl honors during his eight-season NFL career.[19]
William W. Corry Football 1940–1942 Fullback Bill Corry was a senior team captain in 1942.[3]
Clyde Crabtree Basketball
Football
1928–1929
1927–1929
"Cannonball" Clyde Crabtree was a member of the "Phantom Four" backfield of the 1928 Gators team that scored 336 points (a new national single-season scoring record) and compiled an 8–1 win-loss record (the Gators' best-ever record until that time). Crabtree received All-American honors in 1928, and later played for two different NFL teams.[20]
J. Broward
"Brad" Culpepper
Football 1988–1991 Brad Culpepper was a first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, and recipient of the 1991 Draddy Trophy, recognizing him as the outstanding student-athlete in college football. As a senior team captain, he led the Gators to their first officially recognized SEC championship in 1991.[3] Culpepper was drafted by the Minnesota Vikings and played nine seasons in the NFL.[21]
Joseph F. D'Agostino, Jr. Football 1951–1953 A two-way offensive and defensive lineman, Joe D'Agostino was an honorable mention All-American and twice received first-team All-SEC honors.[3] D'Agostino was a key member of the outstanding offensive line that paved the way for Gators backs Rick Casares, Papa Hall and Buford Long during the team's 1952 Gator Bowl season.
Judd D. Davis Football 1992–1994 Placekicker Judd Davis was a walk-on who earned first-team All-SEC and first-team All-American honors. He was the recipient of the Lou Groza Award, recognizing the best placekicker in college football, in 1993. Davis completed over eighty-two percent of his field goals attempts, and 121 of 129 point-after-touchdown (PAT) attempts, including all sixty-five of his PAT attempts in 1994.[3]
Stephen J. DeLaTorre Football 1952–1955 Steve DeLaTorre was a two-way offensive center and linebacker. As a senior team captain in 1955, he was a first-team All-SEC selection and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award.[3]
J. Franklin Dempsey Football 1946–1949 Frank Dempsey was a standout two-way offensive and defensive lineman during the Gators' ironically named "Golden Era" of the late 1940s, and was a major factor in the rushing success of All-SEC tailback Chuck Hunsinger. After college, Dempsey played four seasons for the NFL's Chicago Bears,[22] and two more seasons in the CFL, where he was named an Eastern All-Star in 1955.[23]
Guy D. Dennis Football 1966–1968 Offensive lineman Guy Dennis was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, a senior team captain, and a recipient of the team's Fergie Ferguson Award.[3] Dennis was drafted by the Cincinnati Bengals, and he played seven NFL seasons for the Bengals and Detroit Lions.[24]
Dwayne K. Dixon Football 1980–1983 Wide receiver Dwayne Dixon was a first-team All-SEC selection, an All-American, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award. He led the team in receiving yardage in 1982 and 1983.[3] Dixon signed with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 1984, and enjoyed a seven-year professional career,[25] before returning to Gainesville to become an assistant coach.
Christopher P. Doering Football 1993–1995 Wide receiver Chris Doering was a walk-on player who earned an athletic scholarship, a first-team All-SEC selection, and All-American honors. As a starter, he was a member of three consecutive SEC championship teams, and became a team captain as a senior. He finished his Gators career with 2,107 receiving yards and thirty-one touchdowns.[3] After college, he played in the NFL for nine seasons.[26]
Jimmy D. DuBose Football 1973–1975 Running back Jimmy DuBose rushed for 1,307 yards as a senior in 1975. He was a first-team All-SEC selection, the SEC Player of the Year, an All-American, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award. DuBose finished in fifth place in the 1975 Heisman Trophy balloting.[3] A second-round draft pick of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, his NFL career was cut short by a knee injury.
Lawrence W. Dupree Football 1962–1964 Fullback Larry Dupree was a senior team captain, three-time first-team All-SEC selection, first-team All-American, and recipient of the team's Fergie Ferguson Award. Dupree led the Gators in rushing yardage for three seasons, and finished his college career with 1,725 yards.[3]
Thomas L. Durrance Football 1969–1971 Running back Tommy Durrance was one of the "Super Sophs" of 1969, and received a first-team All-SEC selection and All-American honors. During his sophomore season, he scored 110 points—then the team record, and still tied for second on the Gators' single-season records list. Durrance finished his three-year college career with 2,582 yards of combined rushing and receiving yardage.[3]
J. Rex Farrior, Sr. Football
Baseball
1913–1916
1915–1917
Rex Farrior was a two-sport athlete in football and baseball. A four-year football letterman and starter, he was the team's captain in 1916.[3] Farrior later returned to the university to earn a law degree and served as the Gators' head baseball coach in 1924. He became a founding partner in a prominent Tampa-based law firm, and remained one of the biggest boosters of the Florida Gators sports program until his death.
Forest K. Ferguson, Jr. Football 1939–1941 As a two-way receiver and defensive end, Fergie Ferguson set Gators career receiving records that would endure for over twenty years. As a senior in 1941, he received All-American honors. As a U.S Army lieutenant, Ferguson received the Distinguished Service Cross for his heroism under fire during the 1944 D-Day invasion; he was critically wounded and later died as a result. The Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award is named in his honor.[3]
Donald D. Fleming Football
Baseball
1956–1958
1958–1960
A two-way defensive back and wide receiver, Don Fleming was the Gators' team captain in 1958, and finished his college football career as a first-team All-SEC selection.[3] Coach Bob Woodruff ranked him as the Gators' best receiver of the 1950s. Fleming was signed by the Cleveland Browns in 1960, and was an All-NFL selection in 1962.[27] His three-year professional career was cut short by his accidental death in 1963.
Robert G. Forbes Football 1944–1947 Back Bobby Forbes was an All-SEC selection in 1944, when he set a new Florida Field single-game rushing record with a 177-yard performance.[3] Forbes' career was interrupted by World War II military service, but his post-war highlights included an 80-yard touchdown run against Auburn, and an 88-yard kickoff return versus Furman, both in 1947.[3]
Lawrence J. Gagner Football 1963–1965 Guard Larry Gagner was a first-team All-SEC selection in 1964 and 1965, and a first-team All-American in 1965. As a senior offensive lineman, Gagner participated in the 1966 Sugar Bowl, the Gators' first-ever major bowl appearance.[3] Gagner was a second-round draft pick of the Pittsburgh Steelers and enjoyed a successful five-year NFL career.[28]
David L. Galloway, Sr. Football 1977–1980 Defensive tackle and end David Galloway was a star lineman under two different head coaches. As a junior, he was a key member of the Gators defense that led the biggest one-year turnaround in NCAA history. As a senior team captain in 1981, Galloway was a first-team All-SEC selection, and a first-team All-American.[3] The St. Louis Cardinals picked Galloway in the second round of the 1982 NFL Draft, and he played in the NFL for nine seasons.[29]
Max Goldstein Football 1923–1925 Goldy Goldstein was a standout lineman on the Gators teams of the mid-1920s, and received All-Southern honors as a senior in 1925. Goldstein was among the very first Gator alumni to ever play professional football.
Bobby Joe Green Football
Track & field
1958–1959
1959–1960
Bobby Joe Green was a punter and halfback. As a senior, he kicked fifty-four punts for an average distance of 44.9 yards—still the Gators' single-season record. His 82-yard punt against Georgia in 1958 remains the longest by a Gator in the modern era.[3] Green was also a sprinter and high jumper on the Gators track and field team. After college, Green played in the NFL for fourteen seasons, and was a Pro Bowl selection in 1970.[30]
Samuel L. Green Football 1972–1975 Linebacker Sammy Green was a first-team All-SEC selection, a consensus first-team All-American, and a senior team captain.[3] As a sophomore in 1973, he forced a critical fumble that led to a touchdown and the Gators' margin of victory in a 12–8 upset of the Auburn Tigers at home—the Gators' first-ever win at Jordan-Hare Stadium. The Seattle Seahawks drafted Green in the second round of the 1980 NFL Draft.[31]
Rex D. Grossman, III Football 2000–2002 Quarterback Rex Grossman was a first-team All-SEC selection, a consensus first-team All-American, and the runner-up for the Heisman Trophy as a sophomore in 2001.[3] He led the Gators to an SEC championship in 2000, and threw for over 9,000 yards in his three-year career. The Chicago Bears drafted Grossman in the first round of the 2003 NFL Draft, and he started in the Super Bowl for the Bears in 2007.[32]
J. Lewis "Papa" Hall, Jr. Football
Track & field
1950–1952
1951–1953
Papa Hall and fellow backs Buford Long and Rick Casares formed the Gators' winning rushing attack during the team's 8–3 season in 1952, and he ran for ninety-four yards in the team's 14–13 Gator Bowl victory on New Year's Day.[3] Hall was also an NCAA national champion high jumper in track and field. After college, he decided against a professional football career, and became an attorney and circuit court judge.
Malcolm E. Hammack Football 1953–1954 Mal Hammack was a two-way running back and linebacker. As a senior in 1954, he was an All-SEC selection and the first recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award, recognizing the "senior football player who displays outstanding leadership, character and courage."[3] Coach Bob Woodruff rated him as one of the Gators' five best offensive backs of the 1950s. Hammack was a fullback in the NFL for twelve seasons.[33]
Velles A. Heckman Football 1956–1958 Vel Heckman was a standout two-way offensive and defensive tackle. As a senior in 1958, he was a first-team All-SEC selection and a first-team All-American.[3] He was drafted by the San Francisco 49ers, but walked away from professional football to become a high school football coach.
Isaac J. Hilliard Football 1994–1996 Wide receiver Ike Hilliard was a first team All-SEC selection and a consensus first-team All-American as a junior in 1996. He and fellow All-American wideout Reidel Anthony both compiled over 1,000 receiving yards and were key factors in the Gators' offense during their 1996 national championship season.[3] The New York Giants picked Hilliard in the first round of the 1997 NFL Draft, and he played in the NFL for twelve seasons.[34]
Marcelino Huerta, Jr. Football 1947–1949 Guard "Chelo" Huerta was a standout two-way lineman during one of the darkest times of Gators football, the ironically named "Golden Era" of the late 1940s. The stellar line play of Huerta and teammates Frank Dempsey and Jimmy Kynes was a major reason for the All-SEC success of running back Chuck Hunsinger. Huerta became a successful college head coach, and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 2002.[35]
Charles R. Hunsinger Football 1946–1949 Halfback Chuck Hunsinger was one of the Gators' bright lights during the dismal "Golden Era" of the post-war 1940s. He was a first-team All-SEC selection in 1948 and 1949. Memorably, Hunsinger rushed for 174 yards and three touchdowns in the 1949 Gators' upset of the Georgia Bulldogs.[3] He was drafted by the Chicago Bears in the first round of the 1950 NFL Draft, and he played six seasons in the NFL and CFL.[36][37]
Randall B. Jackson Football 1964–1965 Tackle Randy Jackson was a standout lineman on both offense and defense. As a senior in 1965, he was a member of the first Gators team to play in a major New Year's Day bowl game.[3] The Chicago Bears drafted Jackson, and he played for the Bears in 105 games at offensive tackle over eight seasons.[38]
Willie B. Jackson, Jr. Football 1991–1993 Wide receiver Willie Jackson, Jr. was the son of former Gators wide receiver Willie Jackson, Sr. The younger Jackson led the team in receiving twice, was a first-team All-SEC selection, and received All-American honors three times. He finished his college career with 162 receptions for 2,172 yard and twenty-four touchdowns—which remains fifth on the Gators' records list.[3] Jackson played nine seasons in the NFL.[39]
John W. James, Jr. Football 1970–1971 Punter John James was a walk-on player who earned the starting position in 1970 and 1971, and kicked fifty-seven punts for an average distance of 40.3 yards during his senior year in 1971.[3] The Atlanta Falcons signed James in 1972, and he played thirteen seasons in the NFL, and was a three-time Pro Bowl selection.[40]
Alonzo Johnson Football 1981–1985 Linebacker Alonzo Johnson was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, two-time first-team All-American, and two-time team captain. He was a key member of the Gators defense that produced two first-place SEC finishes in 1984 and 1985. He finished his college career with 335 tackles, fifty-five tackles for a loss, and twenty-seven quarterback sacks.[3] The Philadelphia Eagles picked him in the second round of the 1986 NFL Draft.[41]
Ellis B. Johnson Football 1991–1994 As a senior team captain on the Gators' 1994 SEC championship team, defensive lineman Ellis Johnson was a first-team All-SEC selection, an All-American, CNN's National Defensive Player of the Year, and the team's most valuable player. He finished his Gators career with 16.3 quarterback sacks and 26.8 tackles for a loss.[3] Ellis was a first-round draft pick of the Indianapolis Colts.[42]
Edgar C. Jones Football
Basketball
1923–1925
1924–1925
Halfback Edgar Jones was the senior team captain of the 1925 Gators team that finished 8–2—the best record in the first twenty seasons of the Gators football team. Jones scored sixteen touchdowns and 108 points—still fifth on the Gators' records list.[3] He was also a two-time captain of the basketball team. Jones later returned to the university as an assistant coach and athletic director.
James R. Jones Football 1979–1982 Running back James Jones was a two-time team captain, two-time first-team All-SEC selection, an All-American, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award. He finished his college career with 2,026 yards rushing, 593 yards receiving, and forty-eight yards passing.[3] The Detroit Lions picked Jones in the first round of the 1983 NFL Draft, and he played in ten NFL seasons.[43]
James W. Kynes Football 1946–1949 Jimmy Kynes was a two-way offensive and defensive lineman and a senior team captain in 1949. He was one of the great players of the worst time in Gators football history, the ironically named "Golden Era" of the late 1940s. Kynes later served as the attorney general of Florida. His hard-nosed line play is memorialized in the James W. Kynes Award, awarded annually to the best Gator lineman.
William L. Kynes Football 1975–1976 Billy Kynes was a starting quarterback and a Rhodes Scholar.
Charles W. LaPradd Football 1950–1952 Initially an unrecruited walk-on, two-way defensive and offensive tackle Charlie LaPradd was a first-team All-SEC selection and an Associated Press first-team All-American.[3] Described as a man among boys by his teammates, the former paratrooper and team captain developed a ferocious reputation on defense, and was a key man on the Gators defense during the team's 8–3 bowl season in 1952.
R. Burton Lawless Football 1972–1974 Guard Burton Lawless was a three-year starter, a two-time All-SEC selection, and a first-team All-American.[3] The Dallas Cowboys picked Lawless in the second round of the 1975 NFL Draft, and he played in eighty-two NFL games over six seasons, including Super Bowl XII.[44]
Lawrence P.
Libertore, Jr.
Football 1960–1962 Larry Libertore was a small, but quick-on-his-feet option quarterback and defensive back. He was a key member of the Gators offense during the team's 9–2 Gator Bowl season in 1960—the first time the Gators ever won nine games in a season.[45] Libertore's 786 rushing yards remained the most by a Gators quarterback until eclipsed by Tim Tebow in 2007.[3]
David L. Little Football 1977–1980 Linebacker David Little was a first-team All-SEC selection, a consensus first-team All-American, a senior team captain, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award. He finished his four-year college career with 475 tackles—still the Gators' all-time career record.[3] Little played in 179 games over twelve seasons for the Pittsburgh Steelers.[46]
Buford E. Long Football 1950–1952 Buford Long was a two-way standout at halfback and defensive back. He was part of the Gators' 1952 backfield that included fullback Rick Casares and halfback Papa Hall and led the team to an 8–3 record and a 14–13 victory in the 1952 Gator Bowl—the Gators' first-ever NCAA-sanctioned bowl game. Long played for the NFL's New York Giants for three seasons.[47]
Wilber B. Marshall Football 1980–1983 Linebacker Wilber Marshall was the core of the Gators' defense from 1980 to 1983. He was a three-time first-team All-SEC selection, a two-time consensus first-team All-American, and ABC Sports' Defensive Player of the Year.[3] The Chicago Bears picked Marshall in the first round of the 1984 NFL Draft, and he played in twelve NFL seasons.[48] He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame and the Gator Ring of Honor.[49]
Lynn O. Matthews Football 1963–1965 Defensive end Lynn Matthews was a three-year starter, a two-time All-SEC selection, and a first-team All-American.[3] He was a key man in the Gators defense that made possible the team's first-ever Sugar Bowl invitation. Coach Ray Graves rated Matthews as the Gators' best defensive end of the 1960s.
M. Shane Matthews Football 1989–1992 Shane Matthews was a three-year starting quarterback under head coach Steve Spurrier, and led the Gators to their first officially recognized SEC championship in 1991. Matthews led the SEC in passing for three consecutive seasons, and was a three-time first-team All-SEC selection. As a senior team captain, he was also recognized as an All-American.[3] Matthews played in the NFL for fourteen seasons.[50]
Walter "Tiger" Mayberry Football 1935–1937 Quarterback Tiger Mayberry was one of the greatest natural athletes to ever suit up for the Gators, and distinguished himself as a passer, runner, "coffin corner" punter, and senior team captain. During World War II, he served as a U.S. Marine Corps fighter pilot. Captured by the Japanese after ditching his damaged aircraft in the Pacific Ocean, Mayberry died in a prisoner of war camp.
Lee C. McGriff Football 1972–1974 Wide receiver Lee McGriff was a walk-on player who became a first-team All-SEC selection, an All-American, a senior team captain, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award. McGriff led the SEC in receiving yardage in 1974 with 698 yards.[3] After college, he played for the NFL's Tampa Bay Buccaneers.[51]
Perry C. McGriff, Jr. Baseball
Football
1958–1969
1958–1959
Perry McGriff was an outstanding two-sport athlete in baseball and football. As a football wide receiver, he led the Gators in pass receptions and yardage and was an All-American selection in 1959.[3] As a baseball player, he was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection and a first-team All-American. McGriff was later elected to the Gainesville city commission, the Alachua County commission, and the Florida House of Representatives.
F. Graham McKeel Football 1964
1966–1967
Fullback Fred McKeel was a senior team captain in 1967.[3] Memorably, McKeel scored two of the Gators' touchdowns in their 27–12 upset win over Georgia Tech in the 1967 Orange Bowl—the Gators' first-ever major bowl victory.
Victor R. Miranda Football 1957–1958
1960
As a senior in 1960, guard Vic Miranda was a first-team All-SEC selection, an All-American, and the recipient of the team's Fergie Ferguson Award.[3] A two-way offensive and defensive lineman, Miranda was a key leader of the 1960 Gators squad that finished 9–2 and defeated Baylor 13–12 to win the 1960 Gator Bowl.
Fred Y. Montsdeoca, Jr. Football
Baseball
1948–1950
1948–1951
Punter Fred Montsdeoca was one of the standouts of the Gators' ironically named "Golden Era" of the late 1940s. His superior punting was the key to keeping the overmatched Gators competitive in many games. Memorably, in 1949, he punted seven times against Alabama for an average of fifty-three yards per kick. In baseball, Montsdeoca led the Gators with twenty-six runs batted in and a batting average of .422 in 1951.[52]
Nathaniel Moore Football 1972–1973 Running back Nat Moore was a junior transfer. In 1973, he led the Gators with 145 rushes for 845 yards and nine rushing touchdowns, twenty-five receptions for 351 receiving yards and four touchdown catches, and 230 return yards, while earning first-team All-SEC and All-American accolades.[3] In thirteen NFL seasons with the Miami Dolphins, Moore registered 510 catches for 7,547 yards and seventy-four touchdowns.[53]
A. Dennis Murphy Football 1962–1964 Two-way offensive and defensive tackle Dennis Murphy was an All-SEC selection and a first-team All-American in 1964.[3] He played a single season for the NFL's Chicago Bears in 1965.[54]
Richard R. Nattiel Football 1983–1986 Nicknamed the "Rocket" by his Gators teammates, wide receiver Ricky Nattiel was a first-team All-SEC selection, an All-American, a senior team captain, and the recipient of the team's Fergie Ferguson Award. He finished his college career with 117 receptions for 2,086 yards and eighteen touchdowns; he also had 589 yards in punt returns.[3] Nattiel was a first round NFL Draft choice of the Denver Broncos.[55]
Robert D. "Ark" Newton Football
Basketball
1921–1924
1922–1923
An Arkansas native, Newton was nicknamed "Ark" by his teammates. He was the outstanding Gators football player of the early 1920s, and was described as "a superb punter and classic broken field runner, fearless and football-wise." Newton was the senior captain of the 1924 team that upset coach Wallace Wade's Alabama Crimson Tide 16–6 in Tuscaloosa. Coach James Van Fleet rated him as the best player of his tenure.
Jason B. Odom Football 1992–1995 Offensive lineman Jason Odom was a four-year starter, a first-team All-SEC selection, a unanimous first-team All-American, and a senior team captain. He was also the recipient of the SEC's Jacobs Blocking Trophy. In his four years as a Gator, the team won three consecutive SEC championships, and played for a Bowl Alliance national championship.[3] Odom played four NFL seasons with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.[56]
Louis Oliver, III Football 1985–1988 Free safety Louis Oliver was a walk-on player who earned an athletic scholarship, a starting position, two first-team All-SEC selections, and consensus first-team All-American honors. He was also the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award. In four years as a Gator, he totaled eleven interceptions.[3] A first round NFL Draft choice of the Miami Dolphins, Oliver played eight seasons professionally.[57]
Ralph Ortega Football 1972–1974 Linebacker Ralph Ortega finished his college career with 357 tackles, twelve forced fumbles (eight recovered), and five interceptions. He was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, an Academic All-American, and the senior team captain.[3] The Atlanta Falcons picked Ortega in the second round of the 1975 NFL Draft, and he played six seasons for the Falcons and Miami Dolphins.[58]
Richard A. Pace Football
Baseball
1947–1950
1948–1950
Dick Pace was a three-sport standout in football, basketball and baseball. As a senior baseball player in 1950, he led the team in home runs. Pace later became a long-time SEC basketball and football referee and game official.
Bernard P. Parrish Football
Baseball
1955–1957
1956–1958
Bernie Parrish was a standout two-way halfback and defensive back, and also played baseball. As a junior second baseman, he batted .433 and led the Gators in runs batted in, hits, doubles and home runs, received first-team All-SEC honors, and was the Gators' first-ever first-team baseball All-American. Parrish played eight seasons for the NFL's Cleveland Browns, and was a member of the Browns' 1964 NFL championship team.[59]
Patrick N. Patchen Football 1958–1960 Two-way end Pat Patchen was a first-team All-SEC selection and the recipient of the Gator's Fergie Ferguson award in 1960.[3]
Wayne L. Peace Football 1980–1983 Quarterback Wayne Peace was a four-year starter, an All-SEC selection, and an All-American. During his four-year Gator career, he completed 610 of 991 attempts for 7,286 yards. Memorably, as a freshman he threw for 271 yards and two touchdowns in the Gators' 37–20 victory over the Maryland Terrapins in the 1980 Tangerine Bowl. Peace's 61.6 percent completion average remains the second best in team history.[3]
Carl E. "Tootie" Perry Football 1916, 1919–1921 Tootie Perry was a two-way offensive and defensive lineman, among the largest Gators of the day at 5-foot-10 and 235 pounds, and developed a special talent for blocking punts. Perry was an All-Southern selection in 1920 and 1921, and the senior team captain in 1921.
P. Michael Peterson Football 1995–1998 Linebacker Mike Peterson was a first-team All-SEC) selection, a first-team All-American, and a senior team captain. He posted 249 tackles, three forced fumbles, thirteen tackles for a loss and 8.5 sacks, and was selected by his teammates as the Gators' most valuable player.[3] The Atlanta Falcons selected Peterson in the second round of the 1999 NFL Draft, and he remains an active NFL veteran after thirteen seasons.[60]
Ashley W. Ramsdell Football
Basketball
Baseball
1913–1915
1914–1916
1915–1916
Quarterback Rammy Ramsdell was a three-year letterman and one of the Gators' great talents of the 'teens. Ramsdell's college football career was prematurely ended when he broke his leg playing baseball at the end of his junior year.[61]
T. Johnson Reaves Football 1969–1971 Quarterback John Reaves was a three-season starter, a first-team All-SEC selection, and a first-team All-American.[3] He was one of the "Super Sophs," the 1969 Gators' second-year stars who led the team to its all-time best record of 9–1–1 and an upset victory over Tennessee in the Gator Bowl. The Philadelphia Eagles picked Reaves in the first round of the 1972 NFL Draft, and he played fourteen seasons in the NFL and USFL.[62]
Errict U. Rhett Football 1990–1993 Tailback Errict Rhett was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, and a senior team captain. In four college seasons, he totaled 4,163 rushing yards and thirty-four touchdowns, and 1,230 yards receiving and two touchdown receptions; he remains the Gators' all-time leader in career rushing yardage.[3] He was a second round draft pick of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, and he played in the NFL for seven seasons.[63]
Huey L. Richardson, Jr. Football 1987–1990 Defensive end Huey Richardson was a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, and a senior team captain. At the conclusion of his four years as a Gator, he totaled 26.5 quarterback sacks and 50.5 tackles for a loss.[3] The Pittsburgh Steelers chose Richardson in the first round of the 1991 NFL Draft.[64]
James W. Rountree Football 1955–1957 Jim Rountree was a two-way halfback and defensive back, a first-team All-SEC selection, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award.[3] Coach Bob Woodruff ranked him as one the Gators' two best defensive backs and one of their two best running backs of the 1950s. Rountree played defensive back and wide receiver for the CFL's Toronto Argonauts from 1958 to 1967, and was a seven-time CFL All-Star.[65]
LaMar Sarra Football
Basketball
Baseball
1924–1926
1925–1927
1925–1927
LaMar Sarra was a versatile three-sport letterman who was the captain of both the Florida Gators baseball and football teams in 1926.[3]
Thomas J. Shannon, Jr. Football
Baseball
1962–1964
1964–1966
Quarterback Tom Shannon was a two-year starter who led the Gators to a 17–7 upset victory over Penn State in the 1962 Gator Bowl. Shannon also played first base for the Gators baseball team and scored twenty-five runs in 1964.
John M. Simpson Football 1953–1956 Jackie Simpson was a two-way halfback and defensive back, and a three-time All-SEC selection.[3] Head coach Bob Woodruff ranked him as one of the Gators' three best running backs and the best defensive back of the 1950s. His 100-yard interception return in 1955 remains the longest in SEC history. Simpson was drafted by the Baltimore Colts, and he was a member of the Colts' NFL Championship teams in 1958 and 1959.[66]
Emmitt J. Smith, III Football 1987–1989 Tailback Emmitt Smith rushed for 3,829 yards and thirty-six touchdowns, and was a three-time first-team All-SEC selection, and unanimous first-team All-American.[3] The Dallas Cowboys chose Smith in the first round of the 1990 NFL Draft, and he became the all-time leading NFL rusher with 18,355 yards and 164 touchdowns.[67] He is a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, the College Football Hall of Fame, and the Gator Ring of Honor.[3][68]
W. Lawrence Smith Football 1966–1968 Tailback Larry Smith was a three-year starter, a three-time first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award. He finished his college football career with 528 carries for 2,186 yards and twenty-four touchdowns, and 607 yards receiving.[3] The Los Angeles Rams picked Smith in the first round of the 1969 NFL Draft, and he played in the NFL for six years.[69]
Stephen O. Spurrier Football 1964–1966 Quarterback Steve Spurrier was a first-team All-SEC selection, a consensus first-team All-American, and the winner of the 1966 Heisman Trophy. Spurrier returned to Florida as head coach in 1990, and led the Gators to their first officially recognized SEC championship in 1991, and their first-ever national championship in 1996.[3] He is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame and the Gator Ring of Honor.[70]
Malcolm E. Steen Football 1967–1969 Mac Steen was an offensive lineman who coach Ray Graves rated as the Gators' best right tackle of the 1960s. As the offensive team captain in 1969, Steen led the Gators to an upset 14–13 Gator bowl victory over the Tennessee Volunteers, and a 9–1–1 overall win-loss record—the best in Florida Gators history until that time.[3]
Haywood C. Sullivan Baseball
Football
1951–1952
1950–1951
Haywood Sullivan was a two-sport standout in baseball and football, and is generally rated as the best passing quarterback of the first fifty years of the Gators football program. His equally strong baseball talent led to him receiving a Major League Baseball bonus contract from the Boston Red Sox in 1952, and he rose from team catcher to general manager, and ultimately, to general partner of the Red Sox franchise.
John R. Symank Football 1955–1956 John Symank was a junior transfer to Florida. Coach Bob Woodruff rated him as one of the Gators' five best defensive backs of the 1950s, and among their ten best offensive backs of the decade. The Green Bay Packers picked him in the impossibly low twenty-third round of the 1957 NFL Draft, but Symank rose to become one of the defensive stars of coach Vince Lombardi's 1961 and 1962 NFL Championship teams.[71]
Steven O. Tannen Football 1967–1969 Defensive back Steve Tannen was a first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award.[3] Memorably, he blocked a punt that led to the winning score in the Gators' 14–13 upset of the Tennessee Volunteers in the 1969 Gator Bowl. The New York Jets picked Tannen in the first round of the 1970 NFL Draft, and he played for the Jets for five seasons.[72]
Earl A. "Dummy" Taylor Football 1908, 1910–1912 Dummy Taylor was one of the greatest athletes of the Florida football team's early years. He was described by contemporaneous newspaper accounts as a legendary broken field runner and a master of the hidden ball trick, and could drop-kick field goals on the run from impossible angles. He was the team captain in 1910 and a prominent member of the Gators' Cigar Bowl team of 1912.
Frederick A. Taylor Football 1994–1997 Running back Fred Taylor earned first-team All-SEC and first-team All-American honors. His coaches picked him as a team captain, and his teammates chose him as their most valuable player in 1997. During his college career, he rushed for 3,075 yards and thirty-one touchdowns.[3] The Jacksonville Jaguars picked Taylor in the first round of the 1998 NFL Draft, and he totaled 11,695 rushing yards during his thirteen-season NFL career.[73]
Allen R. Trammell, Jr. Football
Baseball
1963–1965
1964–1965
Two-way defensive back and wide receiver Allen Trammell was a walk-on player who earned an All-SEC selection.[3] He was the Gators' leading punt returner in 1964, and Coach Ray Graves rated him as one of the Gators' two best cornerbacks of the 1960s. Trammell was signed by the Houston Oilers in 1966.[74]
Richard E. Trapp Football
Baseball
1965–1967
1967–1968
In his three-season college career, wide receiver Richard Trapp led the Gators in receiving yardage in 1966 and 1967, and compiled 1,783 receiving yards. He had eight games with 100 yards or more receiving, including 171 yards against the Georgia Bulldogs in 1967. He twice received first-team All-SEC honors, and was the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award as a senior.[3][75]
Dale H. Van Sickel Football
Basketball
Football
1927–1929

1929
Dale Van Sickel was the first University of Florida athlete, in any sport, to receive first-team All-American honors. He was recognized as a first-team All-American as a two-way defensive end and receiver on the great Gators football team of 1928, and received honorable mention All-American honors again in 1929. After graduation, Van Sickel became a Hollywood stuntman and actor.[3]
Ion "Speedy" Walker Football
Basketball
1926–1927
1927–1928
Speedy Walker was the smallest member of the Gators' 1926 and 1927 backfields at 133 pounds, but he could run, pass and kick with equal dexterity. Walker was a key contributor to the Gators' 7–3 season in 1927. He was also the senior captain of the basketball team during the 1927–28 season.
David W. Williams Football 1985–1988 Offensive lineman David Williams started in every game during his four-season college career, including the Gators' first-place SEC season in 1985. He was a two-time first-team ALL-SEC selection, an All-American, and a senior team captain.[3] Williams was a first-round draft pick of the Houston Oilers and started in 106 games during his nine-season NFL career.[76]
Jarvis E. Williams Football 1984–1987 Strong safety Jarvis Williams started forty-five consecutive games (the second highest total in Gators history), and was a key member of the Gators defense that contributed to the Gators' first-place SEC finishes in 1984 and 1985. In four years as a Gator, he had ten career interceptions, and led the team in tackles and punt returns as a senior.[3] The Miami Dolphins picked Williams in the second round of the 1988 NFL Draft.[77]
John L. Williams Football 1982–1985 Running back John L. Williams shared the Gators backfield with Neal Anderson, and the two formed a devastating running attack. In four years as a Gator, he compiled 2,409 yards rushing and 863 yards receiving, and received All-SEC and All-American honors.[3] A first-round draft pick of the Seattle Seahawks, Williams was a two-time Pro Bowl selection and played in Super Bowl XXX.[78]
Lawrence D. Wright, III Football 1993–1996 Safety Lawrence Wright was a member of four consecutive SEC championships teams, and a key defensive player on the Gators' first-ever national championship team in 1996. Wright was a senior team captain, a two-time first-team All-SEC selection, an All-American, a CFA Scholar-Athlete, and the winner of Jim Thorpe Award recognizing him as the best defensive back in college football.[3]
Daniel C. Wuerffel Football 1993–1996 Quarterback Danny Wuerffel was a member of four consecutive SEC championship teams, and led the Gators to their first-ever national championship in 1996. He was a first-team All-SEC selection, a consensus first-team All-American, the recipient of the Draddy Trophy, and the Heisman Trophy winner. In four seasons, Wuerffel completed 708 of 1,170 passes for 10,875 yards and 114 touchdown passes—the best in SEC history.[3]
James K. Yarbrough Football 1966–1968 Six-foot-six, 260-pound Jim Yarbrough was a standout tight end and backup kicker for the Gators. He was drafted by the Detroit Lions in the second round of the 1969 NFL Draft, and played eight seasons for Lions.[79]
H. Jackson Youngblood Football 1968–1970 Defensive lineman Jack Youngblood was a first-team All-SEC selection, a first-team All-American, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award.[3] The St. Louis Rams drafted him in the first round of the 1971 NFL Draft, and he received numerous All-Pro and Pro Bowl honors during his fourteen-year NFL career.[80] Youngblood is a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, College Football Hall of Fame, and Gator Ring of Honor.[3][81]

See also Edit

References Edit

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Bibliography Edit

External links Edit

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