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Joseph Raycroft
Sport(s)Football, basketball
Biographical details
Born(1867-11-15)November 15, 1867
Williamstown, Vermont
DiedSeptember 30, 1955(1955-09-30) (aged 87)
Trenton, New Jersey
Alma materUniversity of Chicago (1896)
Rush Medical College (1899)
Head coaching record
Overall9–4 (football)
66–7 (basketball)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Basketball
3 Helms national (1907–1909)
1 Premo-Porretta national (1909)
4 Western Conference (1907–1910)

Joseph Edward Raycroft (November 15, 1867 – September 30, 1955)[1][2] was the head men's basketball coach for the University of Chicago between 1906–07 and 1909–10.[3] In his four seasons as coach, the Chicago Maroons compiled an overall record of 66 wins and 7 losses.[3] His teams won four Big Ten Conference championships (then known as the Western Conference), and the 1907, 1908, and 1909 teams were all retroactively named national champions by the Helms Athletic Foundation;[4] his 1909 team was also retroactively named the national champion by the Premo-Porretta Power Poll.[5] His 90.4% career winning percentage is the highest all-time at Chicago.[3] Prior to his time at Chicago, Raycroft also served as Lawrence University's head football coach for the 1894 season and compiled a 3–2 record.[6] Raycroft also served as head football coach at Stevens Point Normal School—now known as the University of Wisconsin–Stevens Point—for two seasons, from 1895 to 1896.[7]

Raycroft later served as Princeton University's Chairman of the Department of Health and Physical Education from 1911 until his retirement in 1936.[1][8] Under his watch Raycroft developed a comprehensive student health program based in large measure upon intramural athletics, with participation rates approaching 90 percent of Princeton's undergraduate class.[9]

Head coaching recordEdit

FootballEdit

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Lawrence Vikings (Independent) (1894)
1894 Lawrence 3–2
Lawrence: 3–2
Stevens Point Normal (Independent) (1895–1896)
1895 Stevens Point Normal 3–1
1896 Stevens Point Normal 3–1
Stevens Point Normal: 6–2
Total: 9–4
Indicates BCS bowl, Bowl Alliance or Bowl Coalition game.

BasketballEdit

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Chicago Maroons (Western Conference) (1906–1910)
1906–07 Chicago 21–2 6–2 T–1st Helms National Champions
1907–08 Chicago 23–2 7–1 T–1st Helms National Champions
1908–09 Chicago 12–0 12–0 1st Helms National Champions
Premo-Porretta National Champions
1909–10 Chicago 10–3 9–3 1st
Total: 66–7

      National champion         Conference regular season champion         Conference tournament champion
      Conference regular season and conference tournament champion       Conference division champion

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Raycroft, Joseph Edward, 1867–". Worldcat. Social Networks and Archival Context Project. 2014. http://socialarchive.iath.virginia.edu:8888/xtf/view?docId=ark:/99166/w6g74pxg. Retrieved May 13, 2014.
  2. "Dr. Joseph Edward Raycroft". Find a Grave. 2006. https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/14632081. Retrieved May 13, 2014.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 "2013–14 Chicago Maroons Men's Basketball Media Guide" (PDF). History. University of Chicago. 2013. http://static.psbin.com/r/r/4kbkpifzert7y5/Chicago-MBB-Yearbook-2013-14.pdf. Retrieved May 13, 2014.
  4. "NCAA Division I Men's Basketball – NCAA Division I Champions". Rauzulu's Street. 2004. http://www.rauzulusstreet.com/basketball/college/helmscollegechampionship.htm. Retrieved May 13, 2014.
  5. ESPN, ed. (2009). ESPN College Basketball Encyclopedia: The Complete History of the Men's Game. New York, NY: ESPN Books. p. 531. ISBN 978-0-345-51392-2.
  6. "Lawrence Vikings football" (PDF). Records and history. Lawrence University. 2014. http://www2.lawrence.edu/athletics/football/footballrecords.pdf. Retrieved May 13, 2014.
  7. "Normal School Notes". The Gazette (Stevens Point, Wisconsin). September 18, 1895. https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/36823897/.
  8. "Joseph Raycroft Papers". Princeton University. 2014. http://findingaids.princeton.edu/collections/AC146. Retrieved May 13, 2014.
  9. John Daye, Encyclopedia of Armed Forces Football: The Complete History of the Glory Years. Haworth, NJ: St. Johann Press, 2014; pg. 8.

External linksEdit

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