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Template:Infobox Ambassador

Jerome "Brud" Holland
Date of birth: January 9, 1916
Place of birth: Auburn, New York
Date of death: January 13, 1985(1985-01-13) (aged 69)
Place of death: New York, New York
Career information
Position(s): End
College: Cornell University
Organizations
College Football Hall of Fame

Jerome Heartwell "Brud" Holland (January 9, 1916 – January 13, 1985), one of 13 children, was an American university president and diplomat. He was the first African American to play football at Cornell University, and was chosen as an All American in 1937 and 1938. He was also the first African American to chair the American Red Cross Board of Governors, which named its Laboratory for the Biomedical Sciences in his honor.[1] He was the first African-American to sit on the board of the New York Stock Exchange (1972), and the first appointed to Massachusetts Institute of Technology's governing body, "The Corporation".[2][3][4] After graduating Cornell and teaching at Lincoln University, he attended the University of Pennsylvania, receiving his PhD in 1950. In 1953, he became president of the historically black Delaware State College, serving six years before transitioning to the Hampton Institute, where he was president from 1960 to 1970. In that year, he became ambassador to Sweden under President Richard Nixon.

He became a member of the College Football Hall of Fame in 1965. In 1972, the NCAA awarded Holland its Theodore Roosevelt Award.[5]

His son, Joe Holland, one of ten children,[6] also played for Cornell. He was selected as a third team All-American running back by the Associated Press for the 1978 College Football All-America Team, and as a graduate student with a 3.70 GPA, the same year, as an Academic All American. In 1991, he became a member of the Academic Hall of Fame.[7] An attorney, playwright and entrepreneur, Joe Holland is a Republican, as was his father. He filed as a candidate for Governor of New York in the 2018 election.[8]

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Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
William Womack Heath
U.S. Ambassador to Sweden
1970–1972
Succeeded by
Robert Strausz-Hupé

Template:US Ambassadors to Sweden

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