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Indiana Hoosiers football
AmericanFootball current event.svg.png Current season
150px
First season 1887
Athletic director Fred Glass
Head coach Kevin R. Wilson
Home stadium Memorial Stadium (Indiana)
Year built 1960
Stadium capacity 52,929
Stadium surface FieldTurf
Location Bloomington, Indiana
Conference Big Ten
Division Leaders
All-time record 450–616–45
Postseason bowl record 3–6
Claimed national titles 0
Conference titles 2 (1945, 1967)
Heisman winners 0
Consensus All-Americans 6[1]
Current uniform
275px
Colors Cream and Crimson            
Fight song "Indiana, Our Indiana"
Marching band Marching Hundred
Rivals Purdue Boilermakers
Illinois Fighting Illini
Michigan State Spartans
Kentucky Wildcats
Website IUHoosiers.com

The Indiana Hoosiers football program represents Indiana University Bloomington in NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision college football and in the Big Ten Conference.

HistoryEdit

Fall, 1884 The IU student newspaper made its first reference to football by reporting that a team was being organized.

Fall, 1885 A Yale graduate, professor Arthur B. Woodford, came to Indiana to teach political and social science and during the next year he introduced football to Indiana University. Woodford coached the Hoosiers from 1887 to 1888.

Fall, 1891 Robert G. Miller, a former Bloomington attorney, came to IU as a law student and brought a football with him. Billy Herod, of Indianapolis, was named coach. Herod never played football but had seen it played in the East. Indiana lost to DePauw, Wabash, Butler, and Purdue.

Fall, 1896 Indiana names Madison G. Gonterman, hired away from Harvard, as its football coach. Gonterman's teams go 6-2 in 1896 and 6-1-1 in 1897.

Fall, 1913 It was popular Jimmy Sheldon's last season as head coach. He had the longest tenure of a football coach at Indiana until Bo McMillin coached for 14 years (1934-1947).

Fall, 1914 Clarence Childs, a graduate of Yale University, where he was coached by Walter Camp, is hired as Indiana's first full-time football coach and athletic director. He hires Jim Thorpe, the Olympic great, as one of his assistants. Thorpe also coached baseball at Indiana.

1922 The original Memorial Stadium is under construction. It is to seat 22,000 fans and $250,000 is raised to erect the new facility. The new stadium is built on the grounds of the golf course and will replace Jordan Field, which had been the home of Indiana football since 1887.

March 8, 1934 Bo McMillin leaves Kansas State to be the new football coach at Indiana. McMillin, known nationally for his wide-open approach to football, was a former All-America quarterback at Centre College in Kentucky.

Fall, 1945 Bo McMillin is named national coach-of-the-year and the Football Writers Assoc. Man of the Year.

Sept. 23, 1946 Bo McMillin is named athletic director. He succeeds Z. G. Clevenger.

Aug. 5, 1957 Phil Dickins was suspended for one year because of a Big Ten recruiting violation. Bob Hicks serves as the acting coach, and the Hoosiers finish the year with a 1-8 mark.

Aug. 27, 1958 Construction begins on the new Memorial Stadium. The stadium was designed by the New York architectural firm of Eggers and Higgins.

Fall, 1960 The NCAA decides to disallow any IU win during the Big Ten season because of Indiana's illegal recruiting practices. The Hoosiers lose seven games on their own.

Fall, 1961 IU offers 54 scholarships to freshmen because the number of sophomores and juniors allowed on the Indiana roster is drastically reduced due to NCAA restrictions. Indiana signs 51 of the 54 players who are offered scholarships.

Nov. 7, 1969 A fire destroys the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity house, the home for at least 11 Indiana football players. The players who lived in the house included: Harry Gonso, Eric Stolberg, Hank Pogue, Karl Pankratz, Don Warner, Chris Morris, Jamie O'Hara, Chuck Thomson, Bill Bordner, Dave Hoehn, and Bill Simon.

Jan. 4, 1984 Bill Mallory is the choice of the Indiana University Athletics Committee as IU's new head football coach. He is approved by the Trustees on Feb. 4. Mallory was a head coach at Miami (Ohio), Colorado, and Northern Illinois prior to coming to Bloomington. At Miami, in 1973, he went 11-0 and defeated Florida in the Tangerine Bowl.

Sept. 5, 1986 A $4 million overhaul of the IU football complex is complete. Former IU Coach Sam Wyche contributes $10,000 dollars. The Twelfth Man Club, a 60-member group, kicked in the first $600,000.

Dec. 3, 1986 United Press International honors Bill Mallory as its Big Ten Coach-of-the-Year. The award is voted upon by the Big Ten's head coaches.

Oct. 24, 1991 The Big Ten Conference suspends Coach Bill Mallory for one game for his angry press conference denunciation of the officiating in Indiana's 24-16 loss at Michigan. IU was given the choice of a one game suspension or a $10,000 fine. Mallory asked that the suspension be taken.

Jan. 8, 2002 IU Athletic Director Michael McNeely introduces Gerry DiNardo as the school's 25th head football coach. It marked the third collegiate head coaching stint for DiNardo as he had served as the head coach at Vanderbilt and LSU. He is quickly welcomed to Bloomington with a billboard that read "Welcome to Bloomington Coach DiNardo. The Football Capital of Indiana.[2]

Big Ten ChampionshipsEdit

  • 1945, 1967

Bowl gamesEdit

Indiana has featured in only nine bowl games in 120 seasons, so consistently reaching the postseason is considered a primary goal of the program. An oft-spoken mantra, coined after Terry Hoeppner's death in 2007, is to "play 13," meaning to play an extra game (a bowl game) after the 12-game regular season.

Date Bowl W/L Opponent PF PA
January 1, 1968 Rose Bowl L USC 3 14
December 21, 1979 Holiday Bowl W BYU 38 37
December 31, 1986 All-American Bowl L Florida State 13 27
January 2, 1988 Peach Bowl L Tennessee 22 27
December 28, 1988 Liberty Bowl W South Carolina 34 10
December 29, 1990 Peach Bowl L Auburn 23 27
December 31, 1991 Copper Bowl W Baylor 24 0
December 31, 1993 Independence Bowl L Virginia Tech 20 45
December 31, 2007 Insight Bowl L Oklahoma State 33 49
Total 9 Bowl Games 3-6 157 187

Home stadiumsEdit

Indiana's two Memorial Stadiums are entirely distinct venues and share only the same name, though never at the same time. The current Memorial Stadium was called Seventeenth Street Football Stadium until 1971, when it was renamed Memorial Stadium and the original stadium was renamed Tenth Street Stadium. Tenth Street Stadium hosted the Little 500 bicycle race until Bill Armstrong Stadium was built in 1981. It was demolished in the same year and its former place on campus is currently occupied by the arboretum.

CoachesEdit

Indiana athletic director Fred Glass announced the dismissal of the entire coaching staff on November 28, 2010, following a third straight season with only one conference victory. Glass announced the hiring of Oklahoma offensive coordinator Kevin Wilson on December 7. On December 20, Wilson hired New Mexico defensive coordinator Doug Mallory and Nebraska linebackers coach Mike Ekeler as co-defensive coordinators.[3] Mallory, the son of former Indiana head coach Bill Mallory, was Indiana's defensive backs coach from 1994-1996.

Coaching staffEdit

Name Position
Kevin Wilson Head Coach
Seth Littrell Offensive Coordinator
Kevin Johns Asst. Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks Coach
Mike Ekeler Co-Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers Coach
Doug Mallory Co-Defensive Coordinator/Safeties Coach
Mark Hagen Special Teams Coordinator/Defensive Tackles Coach
TBD Recruiting Coordinator/Defensive Ends Coach
Greg Frey Offensive Line Coach
Deland McCullough Running Backs Coach
Brandon Shelby Cornerbacks Coach

Support staffEdit

Name Position
Mark Hill Head Strength and Conditioning Coach
Will Peoples Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach
Aurmon Satchell Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach
Rick Danison Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach
Josh Eidson Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach
Carter Whitson Offensive Quality Control Coach
Ron Carpenter Defensive Quality Control Coach
TBA Recruiting Quality Control Coach

Head coaching historyEdit

Head Coach Years Seasons Record Pct. Conf. Record Pct. Conf. Titles Bowl Games National Titles vs Purdue
Arthur B. Woodford 1887–1888 2 0–1–1 .250 0
Evans Woollen 1889 1 0–1 .000 0
Billy Herod 1891 1 1–5 .167 0 0–1
None 1892–1893 2 3–6–1 .350 0 0–2
Ferbert and Huddleston 1894 1 0–4–1 .100 0 0–1
Dana Osgood and Wren 1895 1 4–3–1 .563 0
Madison G. Gonterman 1896–1897 2 12–3–1 .781 0 0–1
James H. Horne 1898–1904 7 33–21–5 .602 3–13–1 .206 0 0 0 3–3
James M. Sheldon 1905–1913 9 35–26–3 .570 7–25–2 .235 0 0 0 3–3–1
Clarence Childs 1914–1915 2 6–7–1 .464 2–7 .222 0 0 0 0–2
Ewald O. Stiehm 1916–1921 5 20–18–1 .526 5–10–1 .344 0 0 0 3–0–1
James P. Herron 1922 1 1–4–2 .286 0–2–1 .167 0 0 0 0–0–1
Bill Ingram 1923–1925 3 10–12–1 .457 3–8–1 .292 0 0 0 1–1–1
Harlan Page 1926–1930 5 14–23–3 .388 5–16–2 .261 0 0 0 1–4
Earle C. Hayes 1931–1933 3 8–14–4 .385 2–11–4 .235 0 0 0 0–3
Bo McMillin 1934–1947 14 63–48–11 .561 34–34–6 .500 1 0 0 9–4–1
Clyde Smith 1948–1951 4 8–27–1 .236 4–19 .424 0 0 0 0–4
Bernie Crimmins 1952–1956 5 13–32 .289 6–24 .200 0 0 0 0–5
Bob Hicks 1957 1 1–8 .111 0–6 .000 0 0 0 0–1
Phil Dickens 1958–1964 7 20–41–2 .333 8–27–2 .243 0 0 0 1–5–1
John Pont 1965–1972 8 31–51–1 .380 21–36–1 .371 1 1 0 2–7
Lee Corso 1973–1982 10 41–68–2 .378 28–52–2 .354 0 1 0 4–6
Sam Wyche 1983 1 3–8 .273 2–7 .222 0 0 0 0–1
Bill Mallory 1984–1996 13 69–77–3 .473 39–65–1 .376 0 6 0 7–6
Cam Cameron 1997–2001 5 18–37 .327 12–28 .300 0 0 0 1–4
Gerry DiNardo 2002–2004 3 8–27 .229 3–21 .125 0 0 0 0–3
Terry Hoeppner 2005–2006 2 9–14 .391 4–12 .250 0 0 0 0–2
Bill Lynch 2007–2010 4 19–30 .388 6–26 .188 0 1 0 2–2
Kevin Wilson 2011–present 1 1–11 .083 0–6 .000 0 0 0 0–1
Totals 1887–present 122 450–616–45 .425 194–455–24 .305 2 9 0 37–71–6

RivalriesEdit

Conference RivalriesEdit

Indiana's most intense rivalry is with in-state school Purdue University; the two compete for the Old Oaken Bucket, one of the oldest collegiate football trophies in the nation. Purdue leads both the overall (70–37–6) and trophy (56–27–3) series. Purdue currently holds the bucket after defeating the Hoosiers during the 2011 season. The Hoosiers also have a border rivalry with the University of Illinois, plus a second trophy game (for the Old Brass Spittoon) against Michigan State University. The Spartans are Indiana's dedicated cross-divisional rival. Indiana's rivalries with Purdue and Illinois remained intact, as all three schools are in the same division.

Non-conference RivalriesEdit

The Hoosiers also have a rivalry with the University of Kentucky. The Hoosiers played the Wildcats annually from 1987 until 2005 in what was known as the "Bourbon Barrel" game. The two teams played for a trophy called the "Bourbon Barrel" from 1987 until both schools mutually agreed to retire the trophy in 1999 following the alcohol-related death of a Kentucky football player.[4] Indiana leads the series (18-17-1).

Individual awards and honorsEdit

NationalEdit

PlayersEdit

Anthony Thompson - 1989
Anthony Thompson - 1989

CoachEdit

John Pont - 1967

Big Ten ConferenceEdit

PlayersEdit

Chuck Bennett - 1928
Vern Huffman - 1936
Corbett Davis - 1937
Tim Clifford - 1979
Anthony Thompson - 1988, 1989
Antwaan Randle El - 2001
Anthony Thompson - 1988, 1989
Antwaan Randle El - 2001
Antwaan Randle El - 1998

CoachEdit

Bill Mallory - 1986, 1987

Hall of FameEdit

CollegeEdit

ProfessionalEdit

School RecordsEdit

CareerEdit

SeasonEdit

  • Passing Yards: 3,295 - Ben Chappell, 2010
  • Receiving Yards: 1,265 - Ernie Jones, 1987
  • Rushing Yards: 1,805 - Vaughn Dunbar, 1991
  • Touchdowns: 26 - Anthony Thompson, 1988
  • Sacks: 16 - Greg Middleton, 2007
  • Interceptions: 8 - Tim Wilbur, 1979

GameEdit

[7]

Hoosiers currently in the NFLEdit

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit

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