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Derrick Dockery
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Dockery in 2006
No. 66, 75, 76     
Guard
Personal information
Date of birth: (1980-09-07) September 7, 1980 (age 39)
Place of birth: Garland, Texas
Career information
College: Texas
NFL Draft: 2003 / Round: 3 / Pick: 81
No regular season or postseason appearances
Career history
* Washington Redskins ( 2003 2006)
Career highlights and awards
* First-team All-Big 12 (2002)
Games played     141
Games started     115
Fumbles recovered     4
Stats at NFL.com
Stats at pro-football-reference.com

Derrick Dewayne Dockery (born September 7, 1980) is a former professional American football guard in the National Football League (NFL) for the Washington Redskins, Buffalo Bills and Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at the University of Texas.

Early yearsEdit

Dockery was born in Dallas County, Texas. He graduated from Lakeview Centennial High School in Garland, Texas, where he played high school football for the Lakeview Patriots.

He was tabbed as a second-team All-USA offensive lineman by USA Today, and second-team Class 5A all-state selection by the Texas Sports Writers Association in 1998. He was a two-time first-team all-district performer at offensive tackle.

College careerEdit

Dockery attended the University of Texas at Austin, and played for coach Mack Brown's Texas Longhorns football team from 1999 to 2002. As a freshman in 1999, he served as a backup guard, but saw action in all 14 games, including the Cotton Bowl Classic, at both guard spots and on special teams. In 2000, Dockery played in all 12 games, including the Holiday Bowl.

He helped pave the way for a Longhorns offense that averaged 38.6 points per game. In 2001, he played in all 13 games, including the Holiday Bowl, and started nine contests at both guard spots, also seeing action at tackle. His line play contributed to the Longhorns leading the Big 12 Conference with 39.2 points per game (sixth in NCAA) and averaging 162.3 yards rushing, 250.3 passing, and 412.6 total yards per game. As a senior in 2002, Dockery started all 13 games, seven at right guard and six at right tackle.

Following the season, he was a first-team All-Big 12 selection, and was recognized as a consensus first-team All-American, after receiving first-team honors from the Associated Press, Football Writers Association of America and Walter Camp Football Foundation.[1] He shared the Longhorns' Outstanding Offensive Lineman Award and was a key member of a Longhorn offense that ranked fifth in the Big 12 and 16th nationally in scoring offense (33.8 points per game).

Professional careerEdit

Pre-DraftEdit

Pre-draft measureables
Ht WtArm lengthHand size 40-yd dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert Broad BP<th>Wonderlic</th>
6 ft 6 in 347 lb3518 in1018 in 5.35 s 25 in 7 ft 8 in <td align="center">13</td>

First stint with RedskinsEdit

Dockery was selected in the third round (81st overall) of the 2003 NFL Draft by the Washington Redskins. In 2003, he began his rookie season as a backup at several positions along the offensive line, including left guard and right tackle. He was inserted into the starting lineup in Week 4 against the New England Patriots at left guard, which was his first career NFL start.

He would go on to start the final 13 games of the regular season at left guard. In 2004, Started all 16 games at left guard for the Redskins, teaming with left tackle Chris Samuels to form a solid tandem on the left side of the offensive line. He finished the season with 29 consecutive starts at left guard, even though he is one of the league leaders in false starts.

Buffalo BillsEdit

On March 2, 2007, the Buffalo Bills signed Dockery to a 7-year, $49 million contract with $18 million signing bonus, the third largest in NFL history at his position. He was a two-year starter at left guard, before being released in a salary-cap move on February 26, 2009.[2]

Second stint with RedskinsEdit

On February 27, 2009, Dockery re-signed with the Washington Redskins to a 5-year, $26.5 million contract. He started 16 games at left guard, replacing free agent Pete Kendall. In 2010, he had a streak of 116 straight games played ended, when he was declared inactive in Week 5, after struggling playing in new head coach Mike Shanahan zone blocking scheme. He injured his left knee against the Tennessee Titans. He was released on March 1, 2011.[3]

Dallas CowboysEdit

On September 4, 2011, Dockery was signed by the Dallas Cowboys. He started in the second game against the San Francisco 49ers in place of an injured Bill Nagy, but suffered a sprained medial collateral ligament and a tibial plateau fracture.[4] He recovered in week 8 to replace an injured Montrae Holland as a backup guard for the rest of the season. On August 3, 2012, he was re-signed to be the backup guard to Mackenzy Bernadeau. He wasn't re-signed after the season.

After footballEdit

Following retirement from football, Dockery and his wife Emma attended George Washington University for their MBAs.[5] Dockery has worked for several members of Congress such as Jason Chaffetz and Paul Ryan. In 2016, Speaker Paul Ryan hired Dockery to assist in building coalitions with state and local governments and the business community.[6]

Personal lifeEdit

He is married to wife Emma and have three children.[5] Famous ESPN sportscaster Chris Berman gave Dockery one of his famous nicknames: Derrick "Hickory Dickory" Dockery.[citation needed]

ReferencesEdit

  1. 2011 NCAA Football Records Book, Award Winners, National Collegiate Athletic Association, Indianapolis, Indiana, p. 11 (2011). Retrieved June 23, 2012.
  2. Dockery Being Waived By Buffalo Bills ESPN.com, February 26, 2009
  3. Derrick Dockery, Andre Carter cut
  4. Derrick Dockery not returning soon
  5. 5.0 5.1 "Back to school, the extreme version: NFL players try to master George Washington's MBA". Times Colonist. February 21, 2013. http://www.timescolonist.com/sports/football/back-to-school-the-extreme-version-nfl-players-try-to-master-george-washington-s-mba-1.78041. Retrieved January 14, 2018.
  6. Sherman, Jake (January 14, 2016). "Former NFL player joins Ryan's staff". Politico. https://www.politico.com/story/2016/01/derrick-dockery-paul-ryan-217757. Retrieved January 14, 2018.

External linksEdit

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