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For the women's softball championship, see Women's College World Series.
File:CWS Logo.jpg

The College World Series or CWS is an annual baseball tournament held in Omaha, Nebraska that is the culmination of the NCAA Division I Baseball Championship, which determines the NCAA Division I college baseball champion. The eight teams are split into two, four-team, double-elimination brackets, with the winner of each bracket playing in the best-of-three championship series. The tournament takes place in June of each year.

The NCAA Division II and Division III baseball championships are described below, in the section on other championships.

HistoryEdit

Since 1950, the College World Series (CWS) has been held in Omaha, Nebraska. It was held at Rosenblatt Stadium from 1950 through 2010; starting in 2011, it has been held at TD Ameritrade Park Omaha. Earlier tournaments were held at Hyames Field in Kalamazoo, Michigan (1947–48) and Wichita, Kansas (1949). The name "College World Series" (CWS) is derived from that of the Major League Baseball World Series championship; it is currently an MLB trademark licensed to the NCAA.[1]

Contract extensionEdit

On June 10, 2009, the NCAA and College World Series of Omaha, Inc., which is the non-profit group that actually organizes the event, announced a new 25-year contract extension, keeping the CWS in Omaha through 2035.[2] A memorandum of understanding had been reached by all parties on April 30.[3]

The new contract began in 2011, the same year the tournament moved from Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium to TD Ameritrade Park Omaha, a new ballpark across from CenturyLink Center Omaha.

Format History and ChangesEdit

College World Series 2006 - Finals Game 2 opening

2006 College World Series Championship game at Rosenblatt Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska.

1947 — Eight teams were divided into two, four-team, single-elimination playoffs. The two winners then met in a best-of-three final in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

1948 — Similar to 1947, but the two, four-team playoffs were changed to double-elimination tournaments. Again in the finals, the two winners met in a best-of-three format in Kalamazoo.

1949 — The final was expanded to a four-team, double-elimination format and the site changed to Wichita, Kansas. Eight teams began the playoffs with the four finalists decided by a best-of-three district format.

1950-1987 — An eight-team, double-elimination format for the College World Series coincided with the move to Omaha in 1950. 1950-1953, a baseball committee chose one team from each of the eight NCAA districts to compete at the CWS. Though 1987 the College World Series was a pure double-elimination event. That ended with the 1987 College World Series.

1988-1998 — The format was changed beginning with the 1988 College World Series, when the tournament was divided into two four-team double-elimination brackets, with the survivors of each bracket playing in a single championship game. The single-game championship was designed for network television, with the final game on CBS on a Saturday afternoon.

Before expanding to 64 teams in 1999, the Division I tournament began with 48 teams, split into 8 six-team regionals. The winner of each regional advanced to the College World Series. The regionals were a test of endurance, as teams had to win at least four games over four days, sometimes five if a team dropped into the loser's bracket, placing a premium on pitching. In the last two years of the six-team regional format, the eventual CWS champion - (LSU in 1997 and Southern California in 1998) - had to battle back from the loser's bracket in the regional to advance to Omaha.

1999-2002 — With some 293 Division I teams playing, the NCAA switched to a 64-team, Regional field in 1999, with 8 National (super) Seed teams, divided into 16 four-team regionals (each team seeded 1 to 4), with the winners of each of the 16 "Regionals" advancing to eight two-team, best-of-three-format "Super Regionals". The eight Super Regional winners advanced to the CWS in Omaha, NE. In 2008, a number-4-seeded Regional team, the lowest seeding possible (akin to a #13-16 seed in college basketball's March Madness) - the Fresno State Bulldogs - won the CWS championship, against the Bulldogs of the University of Georgia, winning two of three in the championship series. While the CWS format remained the same, the expanded field meant that eight super regional champions would advance. The 64-team bracket is set at the beginning of the championship and teams are not reseeded for the CWS. Since the 1999 College World Series, the four-team brackets in the CWS have been determined by the results of regional and super-regional play, much like the NCAA basketball tournament. Prior to 1999, the pairings for the CWS were not determined until after the completion of the regional tournaments.

2003-Present — The eight super regional champions advance into two, four-team brackets. The eight super regional winners are not reseeded for the CWS. Those two brackets play double-elimination with the bracket winners then meeting in a best-of-three championship series. Also, in 2003, the tournament returned entirely to cable television on ESPN, which had been covering all of the other games of the CWS since 1982 (and a partial schedule since 1980).[4] The championship final became a best-of-three series between the two bracket winners, with games scheduled for Saturday, Sunday, and Monday evenings. In the results shown here, Score indicates the score of the championship game(s) only. In 2008, the start of the CWS was moved back one day, and an extra day of rest was added in between bracket play and the championship series.

Division IEdit

Year Champion Coach Score Runner-Up Most Outstanding Player
1947 California Clint Evans 8-7 Template:Cbsb link
1948 Southern California Sam Barry 9-2 Template:Cbsb link
1949 Texas Bibb Falk 10-3 Template:Cbsb link Tom Hamilton, Texas
1950 Texas Bibb Falk 3-0 Template:Cbsb link Ray VanCleef, Template:Cbsb link
1951 Oklahoma Jack Baer 3-2 Template:Cbsb link Sidney Hatfield, Tennessee
1952 Holy Cross Jack Barry 8-4 Template:Cbsb link James O'Neill, Holy Cross
1953 Michigan Ray Fisher 7-5 Template:Cbsb link J.L. Smith, Texas
1954 Missouri Hi Simmons 4-1 Template:Cbsb link Tom Yewcic, Template:Cbsb link
1955 Wake Forest Taylor Sanford 7-6 Template:Cbsb link Tom Borland, Template:Cbsb link
1956 Minnesota Dick Siebert 12-1 Template:Cbsb link Jerry Thomas, Minnesota
1957 California George Wolfman 1-0 Template:Cbsb link Cal Emery, Penn State
1958 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 8-7 Template:Cbsb link Bill Thom, Southern California
1959 Template:Cbsb link Toby Greene 5-3 Template:Cbsb link Jim Dobson, Oklahoma State
1960 Minnesota Dick Siebert 2-1 Template:Cbsb link John Erickson, Minnesota
1961 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 1-0 Template:Cbsb link Littleton Fowler, Oklahoma State
1962 Michigan Don Lund 5-4 Template:Cbsb link Bob Garibaldi, Santa Clara
1963 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 5-2 Template:Cbsb link Bud Hollowell, Southern California
1964 Minnesota Dick Siebert 5-1 Template:Cbsb link Joe Ferris, Template:Cbsb link
1965 Arizona State Bobby Winkles 2-1 Template:Cbsb link Sal Bando, Arizona State
1966 Ohio State Marty Karow 8-2 Template:Cbsb link Steve Arlin, Ohio State
1967 Arizona State Bobby Winkles 11-2 Template:Cbsb link Ron Davini, Arizona State
1968 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 4-3 Template:Cbsb link Bill Seinsoth, Southern California
1969 Arizona State Bobby Winkles 10-1 Template:Cbsb link John Dolinsek, Arizona State
1970 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 2-1 Template:Cbsb link Gene Ammann, Florida State
1971 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 7-2 Template:Cbsb link Jerry Tabb, Tulsa
1972 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 1-0 Template:Cbsb link Russ McQueen, Southern California
1973 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 4-3 Template:Cbsb link Dave Winfield, Minnesota
1974 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 7-3 Template:Cbsb link George Milke, Southern California
1975 Texas Cliff Gustafson 5-1 Template:Cbsb link Mickey Reichenbach, Texas
1976 Arizona Jerry Kindall 7-1 Template:Cbsb link Steve Powers, Arizona
1977 Arizona State Jim Brock 2-1 Template:Cbsb link Bob Horner, Arizona State
1978 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 10-3 Template:Cbsb link Rod Boxberger, Southern California
1979 Cal State Fullerton Augie Garrido 2-1 Template:Cbsb link Tony Hudson, Cal State Fullerton
1980 Arizona Jerry Kindall 5-3 Template:Cbsb link Terry Francona, Arizona
1981 Arizona State Jim Brock 7-4 Template:Cbsb link Stan Holmes, Arizona State
1982 Miami (FL) Ron Fraser 9-3 Template:Cbsb link Dan Smith, Miami (FL)
1983 Texas Cliff Gustafson 4-3 Template:Cbsb link Calvin Schiraldi, Texas
1984 Cal State Fullerton Augie Garrido 3-1 Template:Cbsb link John Fishel, Cal State Fullerton
1985 Miami (FL) Ron Fraser 10-6 Template:Cbsb link Greg Ellena, Miami (FL)
1986 Arizona Jerry Kindall 10-2 Template:Cbsb link Mike Senne, Arizona
1987 Stanford Mark Marquess 9-5 Template:Cbsb link Paul Carey, Stanford
1988 Stanford Mark Marquess 9-4 Template:Cbsb link Lee Plemel, Stanford
1989 Wichita State Gene Stephenson 5-3 Template:Cbsb link Greg Brummett, Wichita State
1990 Georgia Steve Webber 2-1 Template:Cbsb link Mike Rebhan, Georgia
1991 LSU Skip Bertman 6-3 Template:Cbsb link Gary Hymel, LSU
1992 Pepperdine Andy Lopez 3-2 Template:Cbsb link Phil Nevin, Cal State Fullerton
1993 LSU Skip Bertman 8-0 Template:Cbsb link Todd Walker, LSU
1994 Oklahoma Larry Cochell 13-5 Template:Cbsb link Chip Glass, Oklahoma
1995 Cal State Fullerton Augie Garrido 11-5 Template:Cbsb link Mark Kotsay, Cal State Fullerton
1996 LSU Skip Bertman 9-8 Template:Cbsb link Pat Burrell, Miami (FL)
1997 LSU Skip Bertman 13-6 Template:Cbsb link Brandon Larson, LSU
1998 Southern California Mike Gillespie 21-14 Template:Cbsb link Wes Rachels, Southern California
1999 Miami (FL) Jim Morris 6-5 Template:Cbsb link Marshall McDougall, Florida State
2000 LSU Skip Bertman 6-5 Template:Cbsb link Trey Hodges, LSU
2001 Miami (FL) Jim Morris 12-1 Template:Cbsb link Charlton Jimerson, Miami (FL)
2002 Texas Augie Garrido 12-6 Template:Cbsb link Huston Street, Texas
2003 Rice Wayne Graham 4-3 (10), 3-8, 14-2 Template:Cbsb link John Hudgins, Stanford
2004 Cal State Fullerton George Horton 6-4, 3-2 Template:Cbsb link Jason Windsor, Cal State Fullerton
2005 Texas Augie Garrido 4-2, 6-2 Template:Cbsb link David Maroul, Texas
2006 Oregon State Pat Casey 3-4, 11-7, 3-2 Template:Cbsb link Jonah Nickerson, Oregon State
2007 Oregon State Pat Casey 11-4, 9-3 Template:Cbsb link Jorge Luis Reyes, Oregon State
2008 Fresno State Mike Batesole 6-7, 19-10, 6-1 Template:Cbsb link Tommy Mendonca, Fresno State
2009 LSU Paul Mainieri 7-6, 1-5, 11-4 Template:Cbsb link Jared Mitchell, LSU
2010 South Carolina Ray Tanner 7-1, 2-1 (11) UCLA Jackie Bradley, Jr., South Carolina
2011 South Carolina Ray Tanner 2-1 (11), 5-2 Florida Scott Wingo, South Carolina
2012 Arizona Andy Lopez 5-1, 4-1 South Carolina Robert Refsnyder, Arizona

CWS appearances & titlesEdit

  • Table is sortable
  • Bold indicates team won the CWS that year
School Appearances Titles Years
Alabama 5 1950, 1983, 1996, 1997, 1999
Arizona 16 4 1954, 1955, 1956, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1963, 1966, 1970, 1976, 1979, 1980, 1985, 1986, 2004, 2012
Arizona State 22 5 1964, 1965, 1967, 1969, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1987, 1988, 1993, 1994, 1998, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2010
Arkansas 7 1979, 1985, 1987, 1989, 2004, 2009, 2012
Auburn 4 1967, 1976, 1994, 1997
Baylor 3 1977, 1978, 2005
Boston College 4 1953, 1960, 1961, 1967
Bradley 2 1950, 1956
BYU 2 1968, 1971
California 6 2 1947, 1957, 1980, 1988, 1992, 2011
Cal State Fullerton 16 4 1975, 1979, 1982, 1984, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1995, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2009
Template:Cbsb link 1 1977
The Citadel 1 1990
Clemson 12 1958, 1959, 1976, 1977, 1980, 1991, 1995, 1996, 2000, 2002, 2006, 2010
Template:Cbsb link 1 1955
Colorado State 1 1950
Connecticut 5 1957, 1959, 1965, 1972, 1979
Creighton 1 1991
Dartmouth 1 1970
Delaware 1 1970
Duke 3 1952, 1953, 1961
Eastern Michigan 2 1975, 1976
Florida 8 1988, 1991, 1996, 1998, 2005, 2010, 2011, 2012
Florida State 21 1957, 1962, 1963, 1965, 1970, 1975, 1980, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2008, 2010, 2012
Fresno State 4 1 1959, 1988, 1991, 2008
Georgia 6 1 1987, 1990, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2008
Georgia Southern 2 1973, 1990
Georgia Tech 3 1994, 2002, 2006
Harvard 4 1968, 1971, 1973, 1974
Hawaii 1 1980
Holy Cross 4 1 1952, 1958, 1962, 1963
Houston 2 1953, 1967
Indiana State 1 1986
Iowa 1 1972
Iowa State 2 1957, 1970
Template:Cbsb link 1 1962
James Madison 1 1983
Kansas 1 1993
Kent State 1 2012
Lafayette 4 1953, 1954, 1958, 1965
Long Beach State 4 1989, 1991, 1993, 1998
Louisiana-Lafayette 1 2000
Louisville 1 2007
Loyola Marymount 1 1986
LSU 15 6 1986, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2004, 2008, 2009
Maine 7 1964, 1976, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986
Massachusetts 2 1954, 1969
Miami (FL) 23 4 1974, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1992, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2008
Michigan 7 2 1953, 1962, 1978, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984
Michigan State 1 1954
Minnesota 5 3 1956, 1960, 1964, 1973, 1977
Mississippi 4 1956, 1964, 1969, 1972
Mississippi State 8 1971, 1979, 1981, 1985, 1990, 1997, 1998, 2007
Missouri 6 1 1952, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1963, 1964
Missouri State 1 2003
Nebraska 3 2001, 2002, 2005
Template:Cbsb link 1 1956
New Orleans 1 1984
Template:Cbsb link 2 1956, 1969
North Carolina 9 1960, 1966, 1978, 1989, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011
NC State 1 1968
Northeastern 1 1966
Northern Colorado 10 1952, 1953, 1955, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1974
Notre Dame 2 1957, 2002
Ohio 1 1970
Ohio State 4 1 1951, 1965, 1966, 1967
Oklahoma 10 2 1951, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1992, 1994, 1995, 2010
Oklahoma State 19 1 1954, 1955, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1990, 1993, 1996, 1999
Oral Roberts 1 1978
Oregon 1 1954
Oregon State 4 2 1952, 2005, 2006, 2007
Penn State 5 1952, 1957, 1959, 1963, 1973
Pepperdine 2 1 1979, 1992
Princeton 1 1951
Rice 7 1 1997, 1999, 2002, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2008
Rider 1 1967
Template:Cbsb link 1 1954
Rutgers 1 1950
St. John's (NY) 6 1949, 1960, 1966, 1968, 1978, 1980
St. Louis 1 1965
San Jose State 1 2000
Santa Clara 1 1962
Seton Hall 4 1964, 1971, 1974, 1975
South Carolina 11 2 1975, 1977, 1981, 1982, 1985, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2010, 2011, 2012
Southern California 21 12 1948, 1949, 1951, 1955, 1958, 1960, 1961, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1978, 1995, 1998, 2000, 2001
Southern Illinois 5 1968, 1969, 1971, 1974, 1977
Southern Mississippi 1 2009
Template:Cbsb link 2 1951, 1955
Stanford 16 2 1953, 1967, 1982, 1983, 1985, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2008
Stony Brook 1 2012
Template:Cbsb link 1 1961
Temple 2 1972, 1977
Tennessee 4 1951, 1995, 2001, 2005
Texas 34 6 1949, 1950, 1952, 1953, 1957, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1965, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1979, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1987, 1989, 1992, 1993, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2009, 2011
Texas A&M 5 1951, 1964, 1993, 1999, 2011
Template:Cbsb link 1 1971
Texas Christian (TCU) 1 2010
Tufts 1 1950
Tulane 2 2001, 2005
Tulsa 2 1969, 1971
UC Irvine 1 2007
UCLA 4 1969, 1997, 2010, 2012
Utah 1 1951
Vanderbilt 1 2011
Virginia 2 2009, 2011
Wake Forest 2 1 1949, 1955
Washington State 4 1950, 1956, 1965, 1976
Western Michigan 6 1952, 1955, 1958, 1959, 1961, 1963
Wichita State 7 1 1982, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996
Wisconsin 1 1950
Template:Cbsb link 1 1956
Yale 2 1947, 1948

Top Ten most CWS wins (games)Edit

Rank School Number CWS Winning % Appearances Wins Per Appearance
1 Texas 82 .589 34 2.41
2 Southern California 74 .740 21 3.52
3 Arizona State 61 .616 22 2.77
4 Miami (FL) 47 .553 23 2.04
5 Stanford 40 .579 16 2.50
6 Arizona 38 .584 16 2.38
6 Oklahoma State 38 .514 19 2.00
8 LSU 35 .636 15 2.33
9 Cal State Fullerton 34 .557 16 2.13
10 South Carolina 32 .615 11 2.91

Top Ten most CWS Finals (appearances)Edit

  • Table is sortable
  • Bold indicates team won the CWS that year
  • Regular indicates team was Runner-up that year
Rank School Champion Runner-up Total Years
1 Southern California 12 2 14 1948, 1958, 1960, 1961, 1963, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1978, 1995, 1998
2 Texas 6 6 12 1949, 1950, 1953, 1975, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1989, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2009
3 Arizona State 5 5 10 1965, 1967, 1969, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1978, 1981, 1988, 1998,
4 Arizona 4 3 7 1956, 1959, 1963, 1976, 1980, 1986, 2012
5 LSU 6 0 6 1991, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2009
5 Miami (FL) 4 2 6 1974, 1982, 1985, 1996, 1999, 2001
5 South Carolina 2 4 6 1975, 1977, 2002, 2010, 2011, 2012
5 Oklahoma State 1 5 6 1959, 1961, 1966, 1981, 1987, 1990
8 Cal State Fullerton 4 1 5 1979, 1984, 1992, 1995, 2004
8 Stanford 2 3 5 1987, 1988, 2000, 2001, 2003

Top Ten most CWS (appearances) w/o a TitleEdit

Rank School Appearances CWS Winning % Runner-up Wins Per Appearance
1 Florida State 21 .400 3 1.33
2 Clemson 12 .333 0 1.00
3 Northern Colorado 10 .130 0 0.30
4 North Carolina 9 .441 2 1.66
5 Florida 8 .393 2 1.38
5 Mississippi State 8 .304 0 0.88
5 Texas A&M 8 .358 0 0.25
8 Arkansas 7 .440 1 1.57
8 Maine 7 .333 0 1.00
10 St John's (NY) 6 .333 0 1.00
10 Western Michigan 6 .428 1 1.50

All-Time CWS National Championships by ConferenceEdit

(Listed by actual Conference affiliation/membership during each Title season)

Rank Conference Titles
1 Pacific-12 16
2 Southeastern (SEC) 9
3 Big Ten 6
3 PCC-CIBA 6
4 Independents 5
4 Western Athletic (WAC*) 5
5 Big Eight 4
5 Southwest 4
6 Big 12 2
6 SCBA 2
6 Big West (BWC) 2
6 Western Athletic (WAC**) 2
7 Atlantic Coast (ACC) 1
7 Missouri Valley (MVC) 1
7 West Coast (WCC) 1
  • CIBA was California Intercollegiate Baseball Association that competed as a division under the Pacific Coast Conference, which operated under its own Charter.[5] (Citation pg 14 of NCAA CWS Record Book - 2012 CWS Media Guide)
  • Independents = Miami Hurricanes (4) and Holy Cross Crusaders (1)
  • (WAC*) Original Western Athletic Conference 1962-1978 (Arizona State & Arizona titles pre 1979)[5][6]
  • SCBA was Southern California Baseball Association (1977-84).
  • (WAC**) Reorganized Western Athletic Conference 1992-Present (Rice & Fresno State titles)[5][6]

Other championshipsEdit

Division IIEdit

The Division II tournament has been held at the USA Baseball National Training Complex in Cary, North Carolina since 2009, with the complex earning the bid to host through at least the 2013 championship. [2] In 2008 and 2009, the title game was shown on CBS College Sports Network.

This division uses a single-game championship rather than the best-of-three series.

The 48-team tournament is also marked by a strict and unbalanced regional structure. Teams are chosen from the division's eight geographical regions, with eight teams being selected to the South Regional, four teams selected to the West Regional and all other regional tournaments consisting of six teams. [3]

Former Division II College World Series sites:

Division IIIEdit

Marietta College (Ohio) hosted the Division III baseball championship from its first year in 1976 through 1987. The 1988 and 1989 series were played in Bristol, Connecticut. Battle Creek, Michigan took over in 1990 and Salem, Virginia, in 1995. The Division III tournament has been held at Fox Cities Stadium in Grand Chute, Wisconsin since 2000. This division uses a pure "double elimination" format rather than the best-of-three series.

Division II ChampionsEdit

Division III ChampionsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. NCAA Trademarks - NCAA.org, footnote at bottom: "College World Series and Women's College World Series: The NCAA is the exclusive licensee of these marks, registered by Major League Baseball, in connection with the NCAA Division I Men’s Baseball Championship and the Division I Women’s Softball Championship."
  2. http://www.cwsomaha.com/press-releases/ncaa-signs-25-year-agreement-with-college-world-series-of-omaha-2.html NCAA Signs 25-Year Agreement with College World Series of Omaha, Inc.
  3. http://www.cwsomaha.com/press-releases/ncaa-memorandum-of-understanding-paves-the-way-for-extending-the-road-to-omaha-through-2.html NCAA Memorandum of Understanding...
  4. [1]
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 "General CWS Records, All-Time Won-Lost by Conference, Pg 14". NCAA.org. June 14, 2012. http://fs.ncaa.org/Docs/stats/baseball_cws_RB/2012/1-CWSGeneral.pdf. Retrieved 2012-06-23.
  6. 6.0 6.1 "WAC - Membership Timeline". Unknown. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Athletic_Conference#Membership_timeline. Retrieved 2012-06-23.

External linksEdit

Template:NCAA Division I Baseball Champion navbox

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