American Football Database
American Football Database
Buck Cheves
Georgia BulldogsNo. 19
Quarterback Graduate
Major: {{{major}}}
Date of birth: (1898-11-29)November 29, 1898
Place of birth: Georgia
Career history
 College(s):
Georgia (1919–1920)
Career highlights and awards
*SIAA championship (1920)

James Parks "Buck" Cheves (November 29, 1898 – April 12, 1995) was a college football player and referee. Cheves was a Southeastern Conference official for 35 years.

Georgia Bulldogs

He led the "ten second backfield" of the 1920 Georgia Bulldogs led by first year coach Herman Stegeman which compiled an 8–0–1 record and won a Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (SIAA) title.[1] It was the first Georgia squad to be known as the "Bulldogs."[2] Cheves played without a helmet because he claimed the headgear impaired his hearing.[2] He returned a kick blocked by Puss Whelchel 87 yards for a touchdown to defeat Alabama,[3] ranked fourth in The 50 Greatest Plays In Georgia Bulldogs Football History.[4] He also starred in the backfield of 1919.[5] Cheves was also a guard on the Georgia basketball team.[6] Cheves was the captain of the 1921 basketball team that lost to Basil Hayden and the Kentucky Wildcats' "Wonder Team" in the SIAA championship game.[7][8]

A ballad dedicated to Cheves appeared in the student newspaper the Red and Black:

O! Cheves! O! Cheves!

In south, thou art rough,

The enemy grieves

When thou show'st thy stuff,

Thou art like a hurricane,

Thou hittest them hard,

God pity the man

Whom thou dost guard.[9]

In 1945 he was president of the touchdown club of Atlanta.[10] Cheves was inducted into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame in 1976.[7]

References

  1. Michael Bradley. Big Games: College Football's Greatest Rivalries. p. 151. https://books.google.com/books?id=Spp0uaLJ7t8C&pg=PA151#v=onepage&q&f=false.
  2. 2.0 2.1 T. Kyle King. "Georgia Bulldogs v. Alabama Crimson Tide Game Day Open Comment Thread". http://www.dawgsports.com/2008/9/27/622895/georgia-bulldogs-v-alabama. Retrieved January 30, 2015.
  3. "Longest Plays". http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/geo/sports/m-footbl/auto_pdf/2014-15/misc_non_event/14fb-history-longest.pdf. Retrieved January 30, 2015.
  4. Patrick Garbin (August 5, 2008). The 50 Greatest Plays in Georgia Bulldogs Football History.
  5. H. J. Stegeman (1920). "Foot Ball in the South". The Official National Collegiate Athletic Association Football Guide: 97. https://books.google.com/books?id=hww7AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA97#v=onepage&q&f=false.
  6. "[1"]. The Sigma Chi Quarterly 40: 310. 1921. https://books.google.com/books?id=HQ8TAAAAIAAJ&q=%22buck+cheves%22+georgia+football&dq=%22buck+cheves%22+georgia+football&hl=en&sa=X&ei=KWDLVPr5LbHdsATnkoGoDQ&ved=0CCkQ6wEwAg.
  7. 7.0 7.1 "James P. "Buck" Cheves". http://georgiasportshalloffame.com/site/our-inductees/. Retrieved January 30, 2015.
  8. Fuzzy Woodruff. "U. of K. Defeats Georgia Bulldog". http://www.bigbluehistory.net/bb/statistics/Games/19210301Georgia.html.
  9. Patrick Garbin. About Them Dawgs!: Georgia Football's Memorable Teams and Players. p. 30. https://books.google.com/books?id=LdDCq3ybJPwC&pg=PA30#v=onepage&q&f=false.
  10. "The Touchdown Club of Atlanta History". Archived from the original on February 21, 2015. https://web.archive.org/web/20150221090244/http://touchdownclubofatlanta.com/index.php/about-us. Retrieved January 30, 2015.

External links

Template:1920 Georgia Bulldogs football navbox