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Big Eight Conference
Established1907
Dissolved1996
AssociationNCAA
DivisionDivision I
Members8 (final), 12 (total)
Sports fielded21[1] (men's: 11; women's: 10)
RegionMidwestern United States, Mountain States, West South Central States
Former namesMissouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association (1907–1964)
Big Six Conference (1928–1948, unofficial)
Big Seven Conference (1948–1957, unofficial)
Big Eight Conference (1957–1964, unofficial)
HeadquartersKansas City, Missouri
CommissionerCarl C. James (final) 1980–1996
Websitehttp://bigeightsports.com
Locations

The Big Eight Conference, a former NCAA-affiliated Division I-A college athletic association that sponsored football, was formed in January 1907 as the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association (MVIAA)[2] by its charter member schools: the University of Kansas, University of Missouri,[2] University of Nebraska, and Washington University in St. Louis. Additionally, the University of Iowa was a joint member of the newly formed MVIAA and the older Western Conference (now the Big Ten Conference).

The Big Eight dissolved in 1996, when its members joined the newly formed Big 12 Conference. The Big Eight's headquarters were in Kansas City, Missouri. Although Kansas City wanted to be the home for the headquarters of the new conference, the member schools voted, 7–5, to establish the conference headquarters in Irving, Texas, a suburb of Dallas. (The four Texas schools plus Colorado, Oklahoma, and Oklahoma State voted for Irving, while Iowa State, Kansas, Kansas State, Missouri, and Nebraska voted for Kansas City.[3])

HistoryEdit

The conference was founded as the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association (MVIAA) at a meeting on January 12, 1907, by five charter members: the University of Kansas, the University of Missouri, the University of Nebraska, Washington University in St. Louis, and the University of Iowa. Iowa would only participate in the sports of football and outdoor men's track and field.[4]

In 1908, Drake University and Iowa Agricultural College (now Iowa State University) joined the MVIAA, increasing the conference membership to seven. Iowa departed in 1911, but Kansas State University joined the conference in 1913. Nebraska left in 1918 to play two seasons as an independent before returning to the fold. In 1919, the University of Oklahoma and Saint Louis University applied for membership, but both schools were disapproved due to deficient management of their athletic programs.[5] The conference added Grinnell College in 1919, with the University of Oklahoma following suit in 1920. Oklahoma A&M University joined in 1925, bringing conference membership to ten, an all-time high.[6]

Conference splitEdit

The year 1928 proved to be a pivotal one as the conference split up. At a meeting in Lincoln, Nebraska, on May 19, 1928, six of the seven state schools (excluding Oklahoma A&M) organized a separate conference. Iowa State, Kansas, Kansas State, Missouri, Nebraska, and Oklahoma claimed the MVIAA name but thereafter became known informally to fans and the media as the Big Six Conference,[2] while the smaller schools of Drake, Grinnell, and Washington University joined with Oklahoma A&M, becoming known as the Missouri Valley Conference (MVC).[7] The similarity of the two conferences' official names, as well as the competing claims of the two conferences, led to considerable debate over which conference was the original and which was the spin-off. For the remainder of the Big Eight's run, both conferences claimed 1907 as their founding date, as well as the same history through 1927.

Conference membership grew with the addition of the University of Colorado on December 1, 1947, from the Mountain States Conference.[8] Later that month, Reaves E. Peters was hired as "Commissioner of Officials and Assistant Secretary" and set up the first conference offices in Kansas City, Missouri. With the addition of Colorado, the conference's unofficial name became the Big Seven Conference, coincidentally, the former unofficial name of the MSC.

The final membership change happened ten years later, when Oklahoma A&M, now known as Oklahoma State University, rejoined the conference on June 1, 1957,[9] and the conference became known as the Big Eight. That same year, Peters' title was changed to "Executive Secretary" of the conference. He retired in June 1963 and was replaced by Wayne Duke, whose title was later changed to "Commissioner."

In 1964, the conference legally assumed the name "Big Eight Conference." In 1968 the conference began a long association with the Orange Bowl, sending its champion annually to play in the prestigious bowl game in Miami, Florida.

Big TwelveEdit

The conference remained unchanged until 1996, when four former members of the now-defunct Southwest ConferenceBaylor University, University of Texas, Texas A&M University, and Texas Tech University – joined with the eight member schools to form the Big 12 Conference. Talks of a merger between the two conferences were mentioned as early as 1994.[10] The original membership of the Big 12 was essentially the old Big Eight plus four Texas schools, but the new conference did not officially claim the Big Eight's history as its own.[11] Nonetheless, some college football history sources list both conferences as in continuous operation from 1907 onward.[citation needed]

MembersEdit

Final members Edit

Institution Location
(Population)
Founded Type Enrollment Endowment Nickname Mascot Varsity Sports National Titles[12][13]*
University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado
(83,312)
1876 Public 30,128 $665,000,000[14] Buffaloes Ralphie the Buffalo / Chip 14 25
Iowa State University Ames, Iowa
(47,198)
1858 Public 28,682[15] $452,200,000[16] Cyclones Cy the Cardinal 16 19
University of Kansas Lawrence, Kansas
(65,608)
1865 Public 30,004[17] $1,005,000,000[14] Jayhawks Big Jay / Baby Jay 16 12
Kansas State University Manhattan, Kansas
(37,712)
1863 Public 23,588[18] $277,600,000[14] Wildcats Willie the Wildcat 14 0
University of Missouri Columbia, Missouri
(69,101)
1839 Public 33,318[19] $974,900,000[14] Tigers Truman the Tiger 18 2
University of Nebraska Lincoln, Nebraska
(191,972)
1869 Public 24,100[20] $1,140,000,000[14] Cornhuskers Herbie Husker / Lil' Red 21 23
University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma
(80,071)
1890 Public 29,721 $968,400,000[14] Sooners Sooner Schooner / Boomer and Sooner 19 25
Oklahoma State University Stillwater, Oklahoma
(36,676)
1890 Public 23,307 $239,000,000[21] Cowboys Pistol Pete / Bullet 16 50

</div>

Previous members Edit

Institution Location
(Population)
Founded Type Enrollment Endowment Nickname Mascot Varsity Sports National Titles[12][13]*
Drake University Des Moines, Iowa
(193,187)
1881 Private 3,164 $135,000,000[14] Bulldogs Spike 17 ??
Grinnell College Grinnell, Iowa
(8,902)
1846 Private 1,688 $1,260,000,000[22] Pioneers 20 ??
University of Iowa Iowa City, Iowa
(59,735)
1847 Public 30,825 $791,231,000[14] Hawkeyes Herky the Hawk 24 26
Washington University in St. Louis St. Louis, Missouri
(396,685)
1853 Private 13,995 $4,600,000,000[23] Bears[24] 17 ??

</div>

Membership timelineEdit

Big 12University of ColoradoBig 12Oklahoma State UniversityBig 12University of OklahomaGrinnell CollegeBig 12Kansas State UniversityBig 12Iowa State UniversityDrake UniversityBig 12University of NebraskaBig 12University of MissouriBig 12University of KansasWashington University in St. LouisUniversity of Iowa

Full members Other Conference

Subsequent conference affiliationsEdit

Team Left for Current home
Colorado Big 12 Conference Pacific-12 Conference1
Drake Missouri Valley Conference Pioneer Football League
Missouri Valley Conference2
Grinnell Missouri Valley Conference Midwest Conference3
Iowa Big Ten Conference
Iowa State Big 12 Conference
Kansas
Kansas State
Missouri Big 12 Conference Southeastern Conference4
Nebraska Big 12 Conference Big Ten Conference5
Oklahoma Big 12 Conference
Oklahoma State
Washington-St. Louis Missouri Valley Conference University Athletic Association6
  1. ^ Colorado left the Big 12 for the Pac-12 beginning with the 2011-12 season.
  2. ^ Drake withdrew from the Missouri Valley Conference from 1951-1956. The MVC stopped sponsoring football in 1985; Drake remains a member for all non-football sports. The football program was independent until the football-only Pioneer League began play with the 1993-94 season.
  3. ^ Grinnell joined the Midwest Collegiate Athletic Conference beginning with the 1939-40 season; their affiliation from 1928-1939 is unclear.[25] The MCAC merged with the Midwest Athletic Conference for Women to form the Midwest Conference beginning with the 1994-95 season.
  4. ^ Missouri left the Big 12 for the SEC beginning with the 2012-13 season.
  5. ^ Nebraska left the Big 12 for the Big Ten beginning with the 2011-12 season.
  6. ^ Washington-St. Louis left the MVC in 1946; it joined the College Athletic Conference from 1962 through 1971, and became a charter member of the University Athletic Association, which began play with the 1986-87 season. It was independent in all other years.[26]
</dl>

Commissioners Edit

Commissioners of the Big Eight Conference

File:Big Eight cities.png

Conference championsEdit

[32] [33]

Men's basketballEdit

Following are the MVIAA/Big Eight conference championships from 1907 to 1996.

  • Kansas: 32 outright/43 total
  • Kansas State: 14/17
  • Missouri: 12/15
  • Nebraska: 2/7
  • Colorado: 3/5
  • Iowa State: 2/4
  • Oklahoma: 8/13
  • Oklahoma State: 1/2

Regular season championsEdit

This includes titles in the MVIAA and the Big 6 and Big 7 conferences, with records in parentheses.

MVIAA

  • 1908: Kansas (6–0)
  • 1909: Kansas (8–2)
  • 1910: Kansas (7–1)
  • 1911: Kansas (9–3)
  • 1912: Nebraska (8–2)/Kansas (6–0)*
  • 1913: Nebraska (10–0)
  • 1914: Nebraska (7–0)/Kansas (13–1)*
  • 1915: Kansas (13–1)
  • 1916: Nebraska (12–0)
  • 1917: Kansas State (10–2)
  • 1918: Missouri (15–1)
  • 1919: Kansas State (10–2)
  • 1920: Missouri (17–1)
  • 1921: Missouri (17–1)
  • 1922: Missouri/Kansas (15–1)
  • 1923: Kansas (16–0)
  • 1924: Kansas (15–1)
  • 1925: Kansas (15–1)
  • 1926: Kansas (16–2)
  • 1927: Kansas (10–2)
  • 1928: Oklahoma (18–0)

* In 1912 and 1914, KU and NU were divisional winners and declared conference co–champions since no playoffs were staged either year.

Big 6 Conference

  • 1929: Oklahoma (10–0)
  • 1930: Missouri (8–2)
  • 1931: Kansas (7–3)
  • 1932: Kansas (7–3)
  • 1933: Kansas (8–2)
  • 1934: Kansas (9–1)
  • 1935: Iowa State (8–2)
  • 1936: Kansas (10–0)
  • 1937: Kansas/Nebraska (8–2 apiece)
  • 1938: Kansas (9–1)
  • 1939: Missouri/Oklahoma (7–3 apiece)
  • 1940: Kansas/Missouri/Oklahoma (8–2 apiece)
  • 1941: Iowa State/Kansas (7–3 apiece)
  • 1942: Kansas/Oklahoma (8–2 apiece)
  • 1943: Kansas (10–0)
  • 1944: Iowa State/Oklahoma (9–1 apiece)
  • 1945: Iowa State (8–2)
  • 1946: Kansas (10–0)
  • 1947: Oklahoma (8–2)

Big 7 Conference

  • 1948: Kansas State (9–3)
  • 1949: Nebraska/Oklahoma (9–3 apiece)
  • 1950: Kansas State/Nebraska/Kansas (8–4 apiece)
  • 1951: Kansas State (11–1)
  • 1952: Kansas (11–1)
  • 1953: Kansas (10–2)
  • 1954: Kansas/Colorado (10–2)
  • 1955: Colorado (10–2)
  • 1956: Kansas State (9–3)
  • 1957: Kansas (11–1)
  • 1958: Kansas State (10–2)

Big 8 Conference

  • 1959: Kansas State (14–0)
  • 1960: Kansas/Kansas State (10–4 apiece)
  • 1961: Kansas State (13–1)
  • 1962: Colorado (13–1)
  • 1963: Colorado/Kansas State (11–3 apiece)
  • 1964: Kansas State (12–2)
  • 1965: Oklahoma State (12–2)
  • 1966: Kansas (13–1)
  • 1967: Kansas (13–1)
  • 1968: Kansas State (11–3)
  • 1969: Colorado (10–4)
  • 1970: Kansas State (10–4)
  • 1971: Kansas (14–0)
  • 1972: Kansas State (12–2)
  • 1973: Kansas State (12–2)
  • 1974: Kansas (13–1)
  • 1975: Kansas (11–3)
  • 1976: Missouri (12–2)
  • 1977: Kansas State (11–3)
  • 1978: Kansas (13–1)
  • 1979: Oklahoma (10–4)
  • 1980: Missouri (11–3)
  • 1981: Missouri (10–4)
  • 1982: Missouri (12–2)
  • 1983: Missouri (12–2)
  • 1984: Oklahoma (13–1)
  • 1985: Oklahoma (13–1)
  • 1986: Kansas (13–1)
  • 1987: Missouri (11–3)
  • 1988: Oklahoma (12–2)
  • 1989: Oklahoma (12–2)
  • 1990: Missouri (12–2)
  • 1991: Kansas/Oklahoma State (10–4)
  • 1992: Kansas (11–3)
  • 1993: Kansas (11–3)
  • 1994: Missouri (14–0)
  • 1995: Kansas (11–3)
  • 1996: Kansas (12–2)

Tournament championsEdit

All Big Eight men's basketball tournaments were held at Kemper Arena in Kansas City, Missouri. Through 1985, however, the quarterfinal rounds were played on the home courts of the top four seeds in the tournament.[citation needed]

  • 1977: Kansas State
  • 1978: Missouri
  • 1979: Oklahoma
  • 1980: Kansas State
  • 1981: Kansas
  • 1982: Missouri
  • 1983: Oklahoma State
  • 1984: Kansas
  • 1985: Oklahoma
  • 1986: Kansas
  • 1987: Missouri
  • 1988: Oklahoma
  • 1989: Missouri
  • 1990: Oklahoma
  • 1991: Missouri
  • 1992: Kansas
  • 1993: Missouri
  • 1994: Nebraska
  • 1995: Oklahoma State
  • 1996: Iowa State

FootballEdit

Following are the MVIAA/Big Eight conference championships from 1907 to 1995.

  • Colorado (3 outright/5 total): 1961; 1976 (Co-Champions); 1989; 1990; 1991 (Co-Champions)
  • Iowa (0/1): 1907 (Co-Champions)
  • Iowa State (0/2): 1911 (Co-Champions); 1912 (Co-Champions)
  • Kansas (2/5): 1908; 1930; 1946 (Co-Champions); 1947 (Co-Champions); 1968 (Co-Champions)
  • Kansas State (1/1): 1934
  • Missouri (10/12): 1909; 1913 (Co-Champions); 1919; 1924; 1925; 1927; 1939; 1941; 1942; 1945; 1960*; 1969 (Co-Champions)
  • Nebraska (30/41): 1907 (Co-Champions); 1910; 1911 (Co-Champions); 1912 (Co-Champions); 1913 (Co-Champions); 1914; 1915; 1916; 1917; 1921; 1922; 1923; 1928; 1929; 1931; 1932; 1933; 1935; 1936; 1937; 1940; 1963; 1964; 1965; 1966; 1969 (Co-Champions); 1970; 1971; 1972; 1975 (Co-Champions); 1978 (Co-Champions); 1981; 1982; 1983; 1984 (Co-Champions); 1988; 1991 (Co-Champions); 1992; 1993; 1994; 1995
  • Oklahoma (26/33): 1920; 1938; 1943; 1944; 1946 (Co-Champions); 1947 (Co-Champions); 1948; 1949; 1950; 1951; 1952; 1953; 1954; 1955; 1956; 1957; 1958; 1959; 1962; 1967; 1968 (Co-Champions); 1973; 1974; 1975 (Co-Champions); 1976 (Co-Champions); 1977; 1978 (Co-Champions); 1979; 1980; 1984 (Co-Champions); 1985; 1986; 1987
  • Oklahoma State (1/2): 1926; 1976 (Co-Champions)

* Kansas would have won the 1960 title, but after found to be using an ineligible player they were forced to forfeit their victories over Missouri and Colorado, which meant that Missouri was awarded the 1960 Big Eight title.

WrestlingEdit

Following are the MVIAA/Big Eight conference championships from 1907 to 1995.

  • Iowa State (13/14) 1929, 1933, 1937, 1941, 1947, 1958, 1970, 1976, 1977, 1979, 1980, 1982, 1987 (Co-Champions), 1993
  • Kansas State (3/3) 1931, 1939, 1940 [34]
  • Nebraska (2/2) 1949, 1995 [34]
  • Oklahoma (20/21) 1930, 1932, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1938, 1948, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1960, 1967, 1968 (Co-Champions), 1981, 1985, 1986[34]
  • Oklahoma State (22/24) 1959, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1968 (Co-Champions), 1969, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1978, 1983, 1984, 1987 (Co-Champions), 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1994

Oklahoma State did not accept the trophy in 1992 in order to lessen any consequences stemming from an NCAA investigation of improper payments made to its student athletes.[35][36] They are still listed as champions in the Big Eight record book.

NCAA championships won by MVIAA/Big Eight membersEdit

From 1907 to 1996

BaseballEdit

  • Missouri: 1954[37]
  • Oklahoma: 1951, 1994[38]
  • Oklahoma State: 1959

Men's BasketballEdit

  • Kansas: 1952, 1988
  • Oklahoma State: 1945, 1946

Oklahoma State won its national titles while a member of the Missouri Valley Conference, when it was known as Oklahoma A&M. Kansas was awarded two Helms Foundation national titles in 1922 and 1923 in the MIVAA.

Men's Cross CountryEdit

  • Kansas: 1953
  • Oklahoma State: 1954
  • Iowa State: 1989, 1994

Oklahoma State won its national title while a member of the Missouri Valley Conference, when it was known as Oklahoma A&M.

Men's GolfEdit

  • Oklahoma: 1989
  • Oklahoma State: 1963, 1976, 1978, 1980, 1983, 1987, 1991, 1995

Men's GymnasticsEdit

  • Iowa State: 1971, 1973, 1974
  • Oklahoma: 1977, 1978, 1991
  • Nebraska: 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1988, 1990, 1994

FootballEdit

  • Colorado: 1990
  • Nebraska: 1970, 1971, 1994, 1995
  • Oklahoma: 1950, 1955, 1956, 1974, 1975, 1985

SkiingEdit

  • Colorado: 1959, 1960. 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1982, 1991, 1995

Before 1983, the championship was for men's skiing.

Men's Indoor Track and FieldEdit

  • Missouri: 1965
  • Kansas: 1966, 1969, 1970

Men's Outdoor Track and FieldEdit

  • Kansas: 1959, 1960, 1970

Women's Indoor Track and FieldEdit

  • Nebraska: 1983, 1984

Women's VolleyballEdit

  • Nebraska: 1995

WrestlingEdit

  • Iowa State: 1933, 1965, 1969, 1970, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1987[39]
  • Oklahoma:1936, 1951, 1952, 1957, 1960, 1963, 1974
  • Oklahoma State: 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1946, 1948, 1949, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1958, 1959, 1961, 1962, 1964, 1966, 1968, 1971, 1989, 1990, 1994[40]

Conference facilitiesEdit

This is a listing of the conference facilities as of the last year of the conference 1995-1996.

School Football stadium Capacity Basketball arena Capacity Baseball Stadium Capacity
Colorado Folsom Field 51,655 Coors Events Center 11,065 Hasn't sponsored since 1980 N/A
Iowa State Cyclone Stadium 43,000 Hilton Coliseum 14,356 Cap Timm Field 3,500
Kansas Memorial Stadium 50,250 Allen Fieldhouse 16,300 Hoglund Ballpark 2,500
Kansas State KSU Stadium 43,000 Bramlage Coliseum 13,500 Frank Myers Field 2,000
Missouri Faurot Field 62,023 Hearnes Center 13,611 Simmons Field 2,000
Nebraska Memorial Stadium 72,700 Bob Devaney Sports Center 13,595 Buck Beltzer Field 1,500
Oklahoma Owen Field 82,112 Lloyd Noble Center 11,528 L. Dale Mitchell Baseball Park 2,700
Oklahoma State Lewis Field 60,218 Gallagher-Iba Arena 13,611 Allie P. Reynolds Stadium 3,821

ReferencesEdit

  1. http://www.bigeightsports.com
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Murphy, Austin (November 28, 2011). "Bordering On Hatred: Rivalry Week will once again deliver must-see matchups, but this year's Kansas-Missouri showdown is like no other: It may very well be the last". Sports Illustrated. http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1192444/index.htm. Retrieved 2011-11-25.
  3. "Big 12 Conference offices to be located in Dallas". Associated Press. Fort Scott, Kansas: The Fort Scott Tribune. February 3, 1996. http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=mf0fAAAAIBAJ&sjid=Pf4EAAAAIBAJ&pg=3727,1635375&dq=big-12+dallas+headquarters&hl=en.
  4. http://www.bigeightsports.com/Schools/Iowa/Iowa.htm
  5. "Oklahoma Refused". Lawrence, Kansas: Lawrence Journal-World, via Google News. May 31, 1919. http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=ePBiAAAAIBAJ&sjid=9ngNAAAAIBAJ&pg=3169,4233565&dq=missouri-valley+nebraska&hl=en.
  6. "Oklahoma Aggies in Valley Group". Lawrence Journal-World, via Google News. December 6, 1924. http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=hPFiAAAAIBAJ&sjid=AnkNAAAAIBAJ&pg=7087,5183475&dq=oklahoma+aggies+conference&hl=en.
  7. "Big Six Grid Squads Take Field Tomorrow". Associated Press. The Milwaukee Sentinel, via Google News. September 16, 1928. http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=KlNQAAAAIBAJ&sjid=yA4EAAAAIBAJ&pg=2423,2457251&dq=missouri-valley-intercollegiate-athletic-association&hl=en.
  8. Fullerton, Jr., Hugh (May 27, 1947). "Sports Roundup". Associated Press. Sarasota Herald-Tribune, via Google News. http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=S7YqAAAAIBAJ&sjid=mGQEAAAAIBAJ&pg=5086,5348696&dq=big-six+colorado&hl=en.
  9. 9.0 9.1 "Group To Ask NCAA Opinion". Associated Press. St. Petersburg Times, via Google News. May 19, 1957. http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=bwlSAAAAIBAJ&sjid=L3YDAAAAIBAJ&pg=6722,1539787&dq=missouri-valley-intercollegiate-athletic-association&hl=en.
  10. Tucker, Doug (February 16, 1994). "TALK OF CONFERENCE MERGER PREMATURE, BIG EIGHT SAYS". Deseret News. http://www.deseretnews.com/article/336753/TALK-OF-CONFERENCE-MERGER-PREMATURE-BIG-EIGHT-SAYS.html. Retrieved 11 June 2012.
  11. Moran, Malcolm (August 25, 1996). "Despite Complications, Big 12 Is Instant Commercial Hit". The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/1996/08/25/sports/despite-complications-big-12-is-instant-commercial-hit.html.
  12. 12.0 12.1 "NCAA Men's Championships" (PDF). http://web1.ncaa.org/web_files/stats/champs_records_book/summaries/Men.pdf. Retrieved 2009-06-03.
  13. 13.0 13.1 "NCAA Women's Championships" (PDF). http://web1.ncaa.org/web_files/stats/champs_records_book/summaries/Women.pdf. Retrieved 2009-06-03.
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 14.3 14.4 14.5 14.6 14.7 http://www.nacubo.org/Documents/research/2010NCSE_Public_Tables_Endowment_Market_Values_Final.pdf
  15. "Iowa State University fall enrollment soars to a record 28,682 students". Iowa State University. Archived from the original on 19 July 2011. http://web.archive.org/web/20110719211201/http://www.news.iastate.edu/news/2010/sep/2010enrollment. Retrieved 14 August 2011.
  16. http://www.nacubo.org/Documents/research/2009_NCSE_Public_Tables_Endowment_Market_Values.pdf
  17. KU Fall 2009 Enrollment
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  19. "New Semester Sets Records". http://www.columbiatribune.com/news/2011/aug/22/new-semester-sets-records/. Retrieved 22 August 2011.
  20. "NU enrollment highest in 13 years; up for 5th consecutive year". nebraska.edu. Archived from the original on 20 July 2011. http://web.archive.org/web/20110720012337/http://nebraska.edu/media-resource-center/news-releases/1454-nu-enrollment-highest-in-13-years-up-for-5th-consecutive-year.html. Retrieved 14 August 2011.
  21. http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/oklahoma-state-3170
  22. http://chronicle.com/article/Colleges-Endowments-Earned-12/126071/
  23. http://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/21267.aspx
  24. http://library.wustl.edu/units/spec/archives/facts/mascot.html
  25. http://www.grinnell.edu/files/downloads/Grinnell%20College%20Football%20Season-by-Season%20Records_0.pdf
  26. http://bearsports.wustl.edu/about/Pages/default.aspx
  27. "Reaves Peters, Ex-Big 8 Head, Dies of Cancer". Kansas City, Missouri: Lawrence Journal-World. January 31, 1966. http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=wC1UAAAAIBAJ&sjid=QjoNAAAAIBAJ&pg=5601%2C2658297. Retrieved 12 June 2012.
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  29. http://www.neinassports.com/bio.html
  30. http://www.goduke.com/ViewArticle.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=4200&ATCLID=220764
  31. http://www.big12sports.com/ViewArticle.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=10410&ATCLID=1519866
  32. Big 8 Football Standings
  33. Big 8 Basketball Standings
  34. 34.0 34.1 34.2 http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/okla/sports/m-wrestl/auto_pdf/2008_09_wr_guide_section6.pdf
  35. "Cowboys grab title, not trophy". Associated Press. Dubuque, Iowa: The Telegraph Herald, via Google News. March 7, 1992. http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=nWBFAAAAIBAJ&sjid=KrwMAAAAIBAJ&pg=5845,1318025&dq=oklahoma-state+wrestling&hl=en.
  36. "O-State wrestling under investigation". Associated Press. Junction City, Kansas: Daily Union, via Google News. June 22, 1992. http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=M5hEAAAAIBAJ&sjid=tbUMAAAAIBAJ&pg=2113,5832784&dq=oklahoma-state+wrestling&hl=en.
  37. University of Missouri (2012). "Missouri Tigers baseball record book". University of Missouri. p. 12. http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/miss/sports/m-basebl/auto_pdf/recordbook060310.pdf. Retrieved 1 April 2012.
  38. http://www.soonersports.com/auto_pdf/p_hotos/s_chools/okla/sports/m-basebl/auto_pdf/2008_guide_section8
  39. http://www.cyclones.com//pdf8/763895.pdf
  40. http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/okst/sports/m-wrestl/auto_pdf/WR-0910-MEDIAGUIDE.pdf

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