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Contents: 1960196119621963196419651966196719681969Game of the CenturyStats


1960Edit

1960 Arkansas Razorbacks football
Southwest Conference Champions[1]
ConferenceSouthwest Conference
Ranking
APNo. 7[3]
1960 record8–3 (6–1 SWC)
Head coachFrank Broyles
Home stadiumRazorback Stadium
War Memorial Stadium
Seasons
← 1959
1961 →

ScheduleEdit

Date Opponent# Rank# Site Result
September 17, 1960* Oklahoma State War Memorial StadiumLittle Rock, AR W 9–0  
September 24, 1960* Tulsa Razorback StadiumFayetteville, AR W 48–7  
October 1, 1960 at TCU #14 Amon G. Carter StadiumFt. Worth, TX W 7–0  
October 8, 1960 #20 Baylor #9 Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR L 14–28  
October 15, 1960 at #11 Texas Texas Memorial StadiumAustin, TX W 24–23  
October 22, 1960* #2 Ole Miss #14 War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR (Rivalry) L 7–10  
October 29, 1960 at Texas A&M #12 Kyle FieldCollege Station, TX (Rivalry) W 7–3  
November 5, 1960 #10 Rice #16 War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR W 3–0  
November 12, 1960 SMU #9 Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR W 26–3  
November 19, 1960* Texas Tech #7 Jones StadiumLubbock, TX W 34–6  
January 2, 1961* #10 Duke #7 Cotton BowlDallas, TX (Cotton Bowl Classic) L 6–7  
*Non-Conference Game. #Rankings from AP Poll.
Captains
Steve Butler
Wayne Harris

Cotton Bowl ClassicEdit

1 2 3 4 Total
Razorbacks 0 0 6 0 6
Blue Devils 0 0 0 7 7



1961Edit

1961 Arkansas Razorbacks football
Southwest Conference Co-champions[4]
Sugar Bowl vs. Alabama, L, 3–10[5]
ConferenceSouthwest Conference
Ranking
APNo. 9[6]
1961 record8–3 (6–1 SWC)
Head coachFrank Broyles
Home stadiumRazorback Stadium
War Memorial Stadium
Seasons
← 1960
1962 →

ScheduleEdit

Date Opponent# Rank# Site Result
September 23, 1961* at #9 Ole Miss Memorial StadiumJackosn, MS (Rivalry) L 0–16  
September 30, 1961* Tulsa Razorback StadiumFayetteville, AR W 6–0  
October 7, 1961 TCU War Memorial StadiumLittle Rock, AR W 28–3  
October 14, 1961 at #9 Baylor Floyd Casey StadiumWaco, TX W 23–13  
October 21, 1961 #3 Texas #10 Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR L 7–33  
October 28, 1961* Northwestern St. War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR W 42–7  
November 4, 1961 Texas A&M Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR (Rivalry) W 15–8  
November 11, 1961 at Rice Rice StadiumHouston, TX W 10–0  
November 18, 1961 at SMU Ownby StadiumDallas, TX W 21–7  
November 25, 1961* Texas Tech #9 War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR W 12–21  
January 1, 1962* #1 Alabama #19 Tulane StadiumNew Orleans, LA (Sugar Bowl) L 3–10  
*Non-Conference Game. #Rankings from AP Poll.
Captains
John Childress
Harold Horton
George McKinney

Sugar BowlEdit

1 2 3 4 Total
Razorbacks 0 0 3 0 3
Crimson Tide 7 3 0 0 10



1962Edit

1962 Arkansas Razorbacks football
Sugar Bowl vs. Ole Miss, L, 13–17[7]
ConferenceSouthwest Conference
Ranking
APNo. 6[8]
1962 record9–2 (6–1 SWC)
Head coachFrank Broyles
Home stadiumRazorback Stadium
War Memorial Stadium
Seasons
← 1961
1963 →

OverviewEdit

Quarterback Billy Moore was voted an All-American. Moore scored 14 touchdowns, which tied him with Miami University's kicker Bob Jencks in scoring. Future Razorback head coach Ken Hatfield finished second in the country in punt return yards, behind Utah State's Darrell Roberts. Razorback Kicker Tom McKnelly was fourth in kick scoring, with 33 extra points and 3 field goals.

The Hog offensive unit averaged 5.0 yards per play, and 357 yards per game, the seventh-best mark in 1962. Arkansas also averaged 28.6 points per game, the fifth highest average nationally. Running on the Razorback defense was tough, as the unit gave up 90.7 yards per contest, the seventh-lowest total in the nation.

Arkansas, despite a 9–2 record, finished second[9] in the SWC to Texas, who was 9–1–1, losing only in the Cotton Bowl Classic to the Tigers of LSU, 13–0.[10]

ScheduleEdit

Date Opponent# Rank# Site Result
September 22, 1962* Oklahoma State War Memorial StadiumLittle Rock, AR W 34–7  
September 29, 1962* Tulsa Razorback StadiumFayetteville, AR W 42–14  
October 6, 1962 at TCU Amon G. Carter StadiumFt. Worth, TX W 42–14  
October 13, 1962 Baylor #8 Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR W 28–21  
October 20, 1962 at #1 Texas #7 Texas Memorial StadiumAustin, TX L 3–7  
October 27, 1962* Hardin-Simmons #9 War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR W 49–7  
November 3, 1962 at Texas A&M #8 Kyle FieldCollege Station, TX (Rivalry) W 17–7  
November 10, 1962 Rice #6 Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR W 28–14  
November 17, 1962 SMU #7 War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR W 9–7  
November 24, 1962* at Texas Tech #7 Jones StadiumLubbock, TX W 34–0  
January 1, 1963* #3 Ole Miss #6 Tulane StadiumNew Orleans, LA (Sugar Bowl, Rivalry) L 7–34  
*Non-Conference Game. #Rankings from AP Poll.
Captains
Billy Moore
Ray Trail

Sugar BowlEdit

1 2 3 4 Total
Razorbacks 0 3 10 0 13
Rebels 3 7 7 0 17



The 1963 Sugar Bowl matched up rivals Arkansas and Ole Miss in the Razorbacks second straight Sugar Bowl, and fourth bowl in four seasons. The Rebels also had reached four consecutive bowl games.

After each team kicked field goals, Ole Miss scored the first touchdown, a 33 yard strike from Glynn Griffing to Louis Guy gave the Rebels a 10–3 lead.[11] The Hogs replied with a five yard touchdown toss from Billy Moore to knot the game at 10. Ole Miss QB Griffing then scored on a one-yard touchdown scamper. The Razorbacks would tack on a field goal, but as neither team could dent the scoreboard in the fourth quarter, would lose by a 17–13 final.


Source: Razorback Bowl History – 1963 Sugar Bowl

1963Edit

1963 Arkansas Razorbacks football
ConferenceSouthwest Conference
1963 record5–5 (3–4 SWC)
Head coachFrank Broyles
Home stadiumRazorback Stadium
War Memorial Stadium
Seasons
← 1962
1964 →

OverviewEdit

Ken Hatfield led the nation in punt return yards, gaining 350 on 21 returns. Razorback Ronnie Caveness set a school record in the Texas game with 29 tackles. The NCAA record is 30, set in 2001.[12]

ScheduleEdit

Date Opponent# Rank# Site Result
September 21, 1963* Oklahoma State #8 War Memorial StadiumLittle Rock, AR W 21–0  
September 28, 1963* Mizzou #8 War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR L 6–7  
October 5, 1963 TCU Razorback StadiumFayetteville, AR W 18–3  
October 12, 1963 at Baylor Floyd Casey StadiumWaco, TX L 10–14  
October 19, 1963 #1 Texas War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR L 13–17  
November 26, 1963* Tulsa Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR W 56–7  
November 2, 1963 Texas A&M War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR (Rivalry) W 21–7  
November 9, 1963 at Rice Rice StadiumHouston, TX L 0–7  
November 16, 1963 at SMU Ownby StadiumDallas, TX L 7–14  
November 23, 1963* Texas Tech Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR W 27–20  
*Non-Conference Game. #Rankings from AP Poll.
Captains
Jim Grizzle
Mike Parker

1964Edit

1964 Arkansas Razorbacks football
FWAA Poll National Champions[13]
Southwest Conference Champions[14]
ConferenceSouthwest Conference
Ranking
CoachesNo. 2 (UPI)
APNo. 2[16]
1964 record11–0 (7–0 SWC)
Head coachFrank Broyles
Home stadiumRazorback Stadium
War Memorial Stadium
Seasons
← 1963
1965 →

OverviewEdit

Razorback Guard Ronnie Caveness was named an All-American. Ken Hatfield again led the nation in punt return yards, with 518. Tom McKnelly scored 45 points kicking 27 extra points and 6 field goals, tied him with LSU's Doug Moreau for fourth place nationally.

Arkansas' total defense was fourth-best, allowing only 180.5 yards per game, while the scoring defense was the best in the land, giving up only 5.7 points per game.

ScheduleEdit

Date Opponent# Rank# Site Result
September 19, 1964* Oklahoma State War Memorial StadiumLittle Rock, AR W 14–10  
September 26, 1964* Tulsa Razorback StadiumFayetteville, AR W 31–22  
October 3, 1964 at TCU Amon G. Carter StadiumFort Worth, TX W 29–6  
October 10, 1964 Baylor #9 War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR W 17–6  
October 17, 1964 at #1 Texas #9 Memorial StadiumAustin, TX W 14–13  
October 24, 1964* Wichita State #4 War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR W 17–0  
October 31, 1964 at Texas A&M #4 Kyle FieldCollege Station, TX (Rivalry) W 17–0  
November 7, 1964 Rice #4 Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR W 21–0  
November 14, 1964 SMU #3 Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR W 44–0  
November 21, 1964 at Texas Tech #3 Jones StadiumLubbock, TX W 17–0  
January 1, 1965* vs. #6 Nebraska #2 Cotton BowlDallas, TX (Cotton Bowl Classic) W 10–7  
*Non-Conference Game. #Rankings from AP Poll.
Captains
Seniors

Cotton Bowl ClassicEdit

1 2 3 4 Total
Razorbacks 3 0 0 7 10
Cornhuskers 0 7 0 0 7




Arkansas and Nebraska met for the first time in the 1965 Cotton Bowl Classic in Dallas, Texas. Arkansas' number-one rated defense was giving up only 5.7 points per game, where Nebraska's #7 scoring offense was scoring 24.9 points per contest.

A standing room only crowd watched as the Hogs opened the scoring on a Tom McKnelly field goal, but the Huskers responded with a Harry Wilson punching it in from one yard out. The third quarter passed with no scoring before Bobby Burnett of Arkansas ran in for the go ahead touchdown. Despite being named the AP Poll and Coaches' Poll national champion, #1 Alabama could not hold off Texas in the Orange Bowl, which left Arkansas to take the number one spot in the FWAA Poll and a share of that year's national championship.[17]


Source: Razorback Bowl History – 1965 Cotton Bowl

National ChampionshipEdit

Arkansas was invited to play in the Cotton Bowl Classic on January 1, 1965 against the Nebraska Cornhuskers. The Razorbacks went on to beat the Cornhuskers 10–7 and were selected as national champions by the Football Writers Association of America and the Helms Athletic Foundation as the #1 Alabama Crimson Tide lost their bowl game against the Texas Longhorns in the Orange Bowl.[18][19] Because the final AP and Coaches (UPI) Polls were released before bowl games were played at the time, the Crimson Tide was selected national champions by the AP and Coaches' (UPI) Polls.[20] Because of the controversy, the AP Poll experimented with a voting model that took the final vote to select their champion after the bowl games in the 1965 season. In 1966, the AP Poll went back to taking the final vote at the conclusion of the regular season before finally adopting the post- bowl season model in 1968. The Coaches' Poll adopted the post-bowl season model in 1974 after the controversies surrounding the 1965, 1970, and 1973 national championships.

1965Edit

1965 Arkansas Razorbacks football
Southwest Conference Champions[21]
ConferenceSouthwest Conference
Ranking
APNo. 3[23]
1965 record10–1 (7–0 SWC)
Head coachFrank Broyles
Home stadiumRazorback Stadium
War Memorial Stadium
Seasons
← 1964
1966 →

OverviewEdit

Bobby Burnett tied three others in scoring, with 16 TD's, the fourth-highest total in the nation. Ronny South was second in kick scoring, with 42 extra points and 6 field goals. As an offensive unit, the Hogs had the best scoring offense (32.4 ppg), the eighth-best rushing offense (226.1 ypg), seventh best total offense (360.2 ypg) nationally. The defense was fourth-best against the run (74.9 yards allowed per game).

ScheduleEdit

Date Opponent# Rank# Site Result
September 18, 1965* Oklahoma State #6 War Memorial StadiumLittle Rock, AR W 28–14  
September 25, 1965* Tulsa #5 Razorback StadiumFayetteville, AR W 20–12  
October 2, 1965 TCU #4 War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR W 28–0  
October 9, 1965 at Baylor #3 Floyd Casey StadiumWaco, TX W 38–7  
October 16, 1965 #1 Texas #3 Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR W 27–24  
October 23, 1965* North Texas #1 War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR W 55–20  
October 30, 1965 Texas A&M #2 War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR (Rivalry) W 31–0  
November 6, 1965 at Rice #2 Rice StadiumHouston, TX W 31–0  
November 13, 1965 at SMU #2 Ownby StadiumDallas, TX W 24–3  
November 20, 1965* #9 Texas Tech #2 Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR W 42–24  
January 1, 1966* LSU #2 Cotton BowlDallas, TX (Cotton Bowl Classic, Rivalry) L 7–14  
*Non-Conference Game. #Rankings from AP Poll.
Captains
Seniors

Game notesEdit

TexasEdit

by Quarter1234 Total
Texas 0 11 3 10 24
Arkansas 13 7 0 7 27


Cotton BowlEdit

1 2 3 4 Total
Razorbacks 7 0 0 0 7
Tigers 0 14 0 0 14



The Arkansas Razorbacks put their 22-game win streak on the line in the 1966 Cotton Bowl Classic against their rivals, the Tigers of LSU. Arkansas had the number one scoring offense coming into the game, averaging 32.4 points per contest.

Arkansas took the ball to the end zone on the opening drive, capped by a 19 yard toss from Jon Brittenum to All-American end Bobby Crockett. Running back Joe LaBruzzo then ran in from three yards out for the Bengal Tigers to tie the game at 7. Razorback QB Brittenum then left the game after suffering a shoulder injury and the Hogs fumbled the ball three plays later. LaBruzzo again scored, this time from one yard away, giving the Tigers a 14–7 halftime lead.

Neither team scored in the second half, and Arkansas ended the game on the LSU 24 yard line.[22] Razorback Bobby Crockett set a bowl record with 10 catches for 129 yards.


Source: Razorback Bowl History – 1966 Cotton Bowl

1966Edit

1966 Arkansas Razorbacks football
ConferenceSouthwest Conference
1966 record8–2 (5–2 SWC)
Head coachFrank Broyles
Home stadiumRazorback Stadium
War Memorial Stadium
Seasons
← 1965
1967 →

OverviewEdit

Consensus All-American DT Loyd Phillips finished ninth in the Heisman Trophy voting. Florida QB Steve Spurrier won the award, with Purdue's Bob Griese finishing second. Phillips won the Outland Trophy, awarded to the best interior lineman in the land. Martine Bercher gained an average of 15.5 yards per punt return, the fifth-best mark in the nation. The Hog defense gave up the seventh-lowest point total per game, 7.3.

ScheduleEdit

Date Opponent# Rank# Site Result
September 17, 1966* Oklahoma State #5 War Memorial StadiumLittle Rock, AR W 14–10  
September 24, 1966* Tulsa #6 Razorback StadiumFayetteville, AR W 27–8  
October 1, 1966 at TCU #7 Amon G. Carter StadiumFort Worth, TX W 21–0  
October 8, 1966 Baylor #9 Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR L 0–7  
October 15, 1966 at Texas Memorial StadiumAustin, TX W 12–7  
October 22, 1966* Wichita State War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR W 40–0  
October 29, 1966 at Texas A&M #9 Kyle FieldCollege Station, TX (Rivalry) W 34–0  
November 5, 1966 Rice #8 War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR W 31–20  
November 12, 1966 SMU #6 Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR W 22–0  
November 19, 1966 at Texas Tech #6 Jones StadiumLubbock, TX L 16–21  
*Non-Conference Game. #Rankings from AP Poll.

Game notesEdit

TexasEdit

by Quarter1234 Total
Arkansas 3 3 6 0 12
Texas 0 7 0 0 7

Arkansas' second victory over Texas in three years. [24]


1967Edit

1967 Arkansas Razorbacks football
ConferenceSouthwest Conference
1967 record4–5–1 (3–3–1 SWC)
Head coachFrank Broyles
Home stadiumRazorback Stadium
War Memorial Stadium
Seasons
← 1966
1968 →

OverviewEdit

Arkansas lost to Texas A&M for the first time since 1957.

ScheduleEdit

Date Opponent Site Result Attendance
September 23, 1967* Oklahoma State War Memorial StadiumLittle Rock, AR L 6–7   53,000
September 30, 1967* Tulsa Razorback StadiumFayetteville, AR L 12–14   40,000
October 7, 1967 TCU Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR W 26–0   40,000
October 14, 1967 at Baylor Baylor StadiumWaco, TX T 10–10   32,000
October 21, 1967 Texas War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR L 12–21   53,000
October 28, 1967* Kansas State War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR W 28–7   40,000
November 4, 1967 Texas A&M Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR (Rivalry) L 21–33   41,100
November 11, 1967 at Rice Rice StadiumHouston, TX W 23–9   34,000
November 18, 1967 at SMU Ownby StadiumDallas, TX W 35–17   25,000
November 25, 1967 Texas Tech War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR L 27–31   40,000
*Non-Conference Game. #Rankings from AP Poll.
Captains
Hartford Hamilton
Ernest Ruple
Larry Watkins

1968Edit

1968 Arkansas Razorbacks football
Southwest Conference Champions[25]
Sugar Bowl vs. Georgia, W, 16–2[26]
ConferenceSouthwest Conference
Ranking
APNo. 6[27]
1968 record10–1 (6–1 SWC)
Head coachFrank Broyles
Home stadiumRazorback Stadium
War Memorial Stadium
Seasons
← 1967
1969 →

OverviewEdit

Guard Jim Barnes was a consensus All-American for the Razorbacks in 1968. Bill Burnett's 16 touchdowns scored tied him for eighth-most points scored nationally.

ScheduleEdit

Date Opponent# Rank# Site Result Attendance
September 21, 1968* Oklahoma State War Memorial StadiumLittle Rock, AR W 32–15   53,307
September 28, 1968* Tulsa Razorback StadiumFayetteville, AR W 56–13   41,712
October 5, 1968 at TCU #20 Amon G. Carter StadiumFort Worth, TX W 17–7   41,126
October 12, 1968 Baylor #14 Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR W 35–19   41,429
October 19, 1968 at #17 Texas #9 Memorial StadiumAustin, TX L 29–39   66,397
October 26, 1968* North Texas #16 War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR W 17–15   45,802
November 2, 1968 at Texas A&M #17 Kyle FieldCollege Station, TX (Rivalry) W 25–22   41,925
November 9, 1968 Rice #14 Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR W 46–21   43,817
November 16, 1968 SMU #10 War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR W 35–29   49,112
November 23, 1968 at Texas Tech #6 Jones StadiumLubbock, TX W 42–7   48,165
January 1, 1969 vs. #4 Georgia #9 Tulane StadiumNew Orleans, LA (Sugar Bowl) W 16–2   82,113
*Non-Conference Game. #Rankings from AP Poll.
Captains
Gary Adams
Jim Barnes

Sugar BowlEdit

1 2 3 4 Total
Razorbacks 0 10 0 6 16
Bulldogs 0 2 0 0 2



Georgia's number-one ranked defense matched up against Arkansas ninth-ranked offense on New Year's Day in New Orleans.

Razorback QB Bill Montgomery led the only scoring drive, capped with a 23 yard strike to Chuck Dicus. Georgia responded with David McKnight tackling Razorback Bill Burnett in the end zone for a safety, after which Razorback kicker Bob White took over, adding three unanswered field goals. The game ended with a 16–2 Razorback win. Chuck Dicus caught twelve passes for 169 yards and a score, and was named player of the game.


Source: Razorback Bowl History – 1969 Sugar Bowl

1969Edit

1969 Arkansas Razorbacks football
Sugar Bowl vs. Ole Miss, L, 22–27[28]
ConferenceSouthwest Conference
Ranking
APNo. 7[29]
1969 record9–2 (6–1 SWC)
Head coachFrank Broyles
Home stadiumRazorback Stadium
War Memorial Stadium
Seasons
← 1968
1970 →

OverviewEdit

Bill Burnett scored 20 touchdowns, the third-highest total in the nation. Kicker Bill McClard tied Happy Feller of Texas with 61 points scored, 40 extra points and 7 field goals. As a team, Arkansas had the #1 defense, allowing only 7.6 points per game.

ScheduleEdit

Date Opponent# Rank# Site Result Attendance
September 20, 1969* Oklahoma State #2 War Memorial StadiumLittle Rock, AR W 39–0   51,125
September 27, 1969* Tulsa #3 Razorback StadiumFayetteville, AR W 55–0   43,617
October 4, 1969 TCU #3 War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR W 24–6   48,127
October 18, 1969 at Baylor #3 Baylor StadiumWaco, TX W 21–7   30,200
October 25, 1969* Wichita State #4 War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR W 52–14   36,178
November 1, 1969 Texas A&M #4 Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR (Rivalry) W 35–13   43,140
November 8, 1969 at Rice #4 Rice StadiumHouston, TX W 30–6   32,290
November 15, 1969 at SMU #4 Cotton BowlDallas, TX W 28–15   35,673
November 27, 1969 Texas Tech #2 War Memorial Stadium • Little Rock, AR W 33–0   35,287
December 6, 1969 #1 Texas #2 Razorback Stadium • Fayetteville, AR (Game of the Century) L 14–15   44,598
January 1, 1970 #13 Mississippi #3 Tulane StadiumNew Orleans, LA (Sugar Bowl. Rivalry) L 22–27   82,500
*Non-Conference Game. #Rankings from AP Poll.
Captains
Rodney Brand
Bruce Maxwell
Cliff Powell
Terry Stewart

Game of the CenturyEdit

1 2 3 4 Total
Longhorns 0 0 0 15 15
Razorbacks 7 0 7 0 14



With two legendary coaches (Broyles and Royal), two neighboring states, two football powerhouses (8 of last 10 SWC Championships), and two recent National Championships (Arkansas in 1964 and Texas in 1963), Arkansas and Texas had developed a rivalry. The game was moved from the usual third week in October to the first week in December so it could be televised nationally on ABC. President Richard Nixon attended the game, and AstroTurf was even installed in Razorback Stadium in preparation for the game.

Arkansas' top-rated defense was going up against the #1 rated Texas offense, but the Hogs got on top early, with a 1-yard TD run by Bill Burnett. After halftime, Chuck Dicus hauled in a 29 yard touchdown pass, giving the Razorbacks a 14–0 lead heading into the game's final quarter. Longhorn QB James Street then led his squad to its first touchdown, and as coach Darrell Royal had planned, Texas attempted and completed the two-point conversion, which would in all likelihood prevent a tie.

Arkansas then had the ball and the lead, and a 73-yard drive later, the Hogs were in good position to tack on a field goal that would put the game out of reach, but Razorback QB Bill Montgomery was intercepted in the end zone, giving Texas new life. The Longhorn drive appeared stalled at their own 43, on a 4th and 3, when Royal gambled again. A 44 yard pass to Randy Peschel, catching the ball in double coverage, put Texas at the Arkansas 13. Longhorn RB Jim Bertelsen would run in for the tying six points. The extra point snap was high, but was snared by third-string QB Donnie Wigginton and the kick was converted by Longhorn kicker Happy Feller, giving Texas a 15–14 lead with 3:58 to play.

Arkansas drove to the Texas 40, looking for a field goal from All-American kicker Bill McClard, but the turnover bug struck again as Montgomery was again picked off.

Sugar BowlEdit

1 2 3 4 Total
Razorbacks 0 12 3 7 22
Rebels 14 10 3 0 27



Rivals Ole Miss and Arkansas met in the 1970 Sugar Bowl.

Ole Miss RB Bo Bowen scampered 69 yards to open the scoring, with Archie Manning adding another 18-yard TD run. Down 14–0, Arkansas responded with a 12 yard TD run by Bill Burnett, but the extra point was missed, and after a Rebel field goal and Archie Manning 30-yard TD strike, were down 24–6. Before halftime, Chuck Dicus hauled in a 47-yard pass from Bill Montgomery, but the two-point conversion was incomplete, and the Rebels took a 24–12 halftime lead.

The third quarter produced a field goal from each team, and in the fourth quarter fullback Bruce Maxwell caught a six-yard strike from Montgomery to cut the lead to five, but the rally fell short, the Hogs losing by a 27–22 final.


1960–1969 Statistical LeadersEdit

PassingEdit

Year Player Com Att % Yards
1960 George McKinney 39 90 43 728
1961 George McKinney 32 68 47 426
1962 Billy Moore 51 91 56 673
1963 Bill Gray 34 94 43 483
1964 Fred Marshall 50 94 53 656
1965 John Brittenum 75 149 50 1,103
1966 John Brittenum 76 143 53 1,103
1967 Ronny South 84 142 59 1,159
1968 Bill Montgomery 134 234 57 1,595
1969 Bill Montgomery 93 173 54 1,333

RushingEdit

Year Player Att Yards Avg
1960 Lance Alworth 106 375 3.5
1961 Lance Alworth 110 516 4.7
1962 Billy Moore 131 585 4.5
1963 Jim Lindsey 130 444 3.4
1964 Jack Brasuell 173 542 3.1
1965 Bobby Burnett 232 947 4.1
1966 David Dickey 115 447 3.9
1967 Russell Cody 95 383 4.0
1968 Bill Burnett 207 859 4.1
1969 Bill Burnett 209 900 4.3

ReceivingEdit

Year Player Rec Yards YPC
1960 Jimmy Collier 17 356 20.9
1961 Lance Alworth 18 320 17.8
1962 Jerry Lamb 23 378 16.4
1963 Jerry Lamb 16 240 15.0
1964 Jim Lindsey 24 331 13.8
1965 Bobby Crocket 30 487 16.2
1966 Tommy Burnett 29 401 13.8
1967 Max Peacock 30 468 15.6
1968 Max Peacock 39 497 12.7
1969 Chuck Dicus 42 688 16.4

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

Arkansas Razorbacks Sports Network Online 1960–1969 Football Schedule/Results

  1. Major Conference Champions. 1960 SWC Champions. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on July 13, 2008.
  2. Bowl Games with Top 20 Teams. 1960 Bowl Results. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on July 13, 2008.
  3. Final AP Top 20. 1960 AP Poll. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on July 13, 2008.
  4. Major Conference Champions. 1961 SWC Co-Champions. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on July 13, 2008.
  5. Bowl Games with Top 20 Teams. 1961 Bowl Results. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on July 13, 2008.
  6. Final AP Top 20. 1961 AP Poll. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on July 13, 2008.
  7. "Bowl Games with Top 20 Teams." 1962 Bowl Results. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on July 13, 2008.
  8. "Final AP Top 10." 1962 AP Final Rankings. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on July 7, 2008.
  9. "Major Conference Champions." 1960 Conference Champs. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on July 7, 2008.
  10. "Bowl Games with Top 20 Teams." 1962 Bowl Results. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on July 7, 2008.
  11. "Ole Miss History and Records." University of Mississippi. Ole Miss Bowl History. Retrieved on July 7. 2008.
  12. Arkansas Media Guide. University of Arkansas. Nov. 4, 2006. "Career Leaders-Defense." p. 74.
  13. "1964 College Football Recap." 1964 in Review. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on July 13, 2008.
  14. "Major Conference Champions." 1964 SWC Champions. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on July 13, 2008.
  15. "Bowl Games with Top 20 Teams." 1964 Bowl Results. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on July 13, 2008.
  16. "Final AP Top 10." 1964 AP Poll. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on July 11, 2008.
  17. "1964 College Football Recap." Arkansas- 1964 National Champions. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on July 11, 2008.
  18. "All-Time Grantland Rice Trophy Winners". Football Writers Association of America. http://www.sportswriters.net/fwaa/awards/rice/winners/index.html. Retrieved December 31, 2007.
  19. Kirlin, Bob. "Helms Athletic Foundation/Bill Schroeder National Champions of College Football 1883–1982". http://homepages.cae.wisc.edu/~dwilson/rsfc/history/helms.html. Retrieved December 31, 2007.
  20. Kirlin, Bob. "Coaches' polls (UPI 1950–1990, CNN/USA Today 1991–present)". Archived from the original on January 05 2008. http://web.archive.org/web/20080105074149/http://homepages.cae.wisc.edu/~dwilson/rsfc/history/CoachPolls.txt. Retrieved December 31, 2007.
  21. "Major Conference Champions." 1965 SWC Champions. Infoplease.com. Retrieved on July 13, 2008.
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