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Arizona Wildcats football
AmericanFootball current event.svg.png Current season
100px
First season 1899
Athletic director Greg Byrne
Head coach Rich Rodriguez
Home stadium Arizona Stadium
Stadium capacity 51,811
Stadium surface Bermuda Grass
Location Tucson, Arizona
Conference Pacific-12
Division South
All-time record 621–483–33
Postseason bowl record 7–9–1
Claimed national titles 0
Conference titles 6
Heisman winners 0
Consensus All-Americans 13
Current uniform
275px
Colors Navy Blue and Cardinal Red            
Fight song Fight! Wildcats! Fight! (official)
Mascot Wilbur the Wildcat
Marching band The Pride of Arizona
Rivals Arizona State Sun Devils
Website arizonawildcats.com

The Arizona Wildcats football team is the football team of the University of Arizona, located in Tucson, Arizona, United States. The team competes in the Pacific-12 Conference at the NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision level.

HistoryEdit

Early yearsEdit

The football team began at the University of Arizona in 1899 under the nickname "Varsity". James "Pop" McKale became the first coach of Arizona football history. On Nov 7, 1914, the team traveled to the west coast to play Occidental, then one of the reigning gridiron powers in California. Occidental won 14–0. Arizona later received the name "Wildcats" after a Los Angeles Times correspondent, Bill Henry, wrote that "The Arizona men showed the fight of wildcats".

In 1921, Drop-kicker/receiver Harold "Nosey" McClellan led the nation in scoring with 124 points. Wildcats finished the regular season 7–1, and were invited to UA's first bowl game, the East-West Christmas Classic in San Diego, to play powerhouse Centre College of Kentucky; Arizona lost the game 38–0. On October 18, 1926 UA quarterback and student body president John "Button" Salmon died from injuries sustained in a car wreck. His final words, spoken to coach "Pop" McKale, were: "Tell them.....tell the team to Bear Down." Soon thereafter, the UA student body adopted "Bear Down" as the school's athletic motto. On October 18, 1929, Arizona opened up Arizona Stadium for college football play. They won their first game against Caltech with a shutout score of 25–0. Coach Gerald "Tex" Oliver's "Blue Brigade" played an expanded, more nationwide schedule, Arizona produced their first All-Americans under coach Gerald Tex. The team's 1938 record of 8–2 was a school best to date.

In 1954, under coach Warren B. Woodson, Arizona was led by starting halfback Art Luppino. He went on to lead the nation in rushing, scoring, all-purpose running, and kickoff returns. Art Luppino became the first player in NCAA history to lead the nation in rushing twice. He also tied for the national title in all-purpose running and was third in scoring.

During their time in the WAC conference the Wildcats compiled back-to-back 9–2 seasons under Coach Jim Young, UA's first nine-win campaigns. Receiver Theopolis "T" Bell was named All-American and fullback Jim Upchurch became the second Wildcat to rush for 1,000 yards for two consecutive seasons.

Desert Swarm and Dick Tomey eraEdit

In 1992, Coach Dick Tomey's "Desert Swarm" defense was characterized by tough, hard-nosed tactics. UA lead the nation in scoring defense and nose guard Rob Waldrop is a consensus All-American. In 1993, the team had its first 10-win season and beat the Miami Hurricanes in the Fiesta Bowl by a score of 29–0. It was the bowl game's only shutout in its then 23-year history. In 1994, Arizona was ranked #6. However, Arizona was stunned by Colorado State and the rest of the season went down along with it, continuing a streak of not being selected for the Rose Bowl. Arizona to this day, is the only team in the original Pac-10 that has never played in the Rose Bowl Game.

In 1998, the team posted a school-record 12–1 season and made the Holiday Bowl in which it defeated the Nebraska Cornhuskers. Arizona ended that season ranked fourth nationally in the coaches and Associated Press poll. The 1998 Holiday Bowl was televised on ESPN and set the now-surpassed record of being the most watched of any bowl game in that network's history. In 2000, Tomey was fired just after a season-ending 30–17 loss to Arizona State, the Wildcats' primary arch-rival. After Dick Tomey was fired, Wildcat football declined in wins and went on a bowl game drought. Former Illinois and Texas head coach and ESPN football analyst John Mackovic served a disastrous tenure as head coach during this period; Mackovic alienated his players and never posted a winning record in two and one-half seasons in Tucson, with a 10–18 record (a .357 winning percentage).

Mike StoopsEdit

In 2004, four years after Tomey's firing, Arizona hired Oklahoma defensive coordinator Mike Stoops to take over the Wildcat program. Under Stoops, Arizona started 6–18; his job was in critical danger and his margin for error was very thin. However in his third season in 2006, Stoops led the Wildcats to an improved 6–6 record, the first non-losing season for the school since 1998 when the Wildcats went 12–1 under Tomey. In 2008, the Wildcats earned their first bowl berth in a decade, defeating BYU by a score of 31–21.

In 2009, the Wildcats earned their second straight bowl berth and a second straight eight-win season. On November 21, 2009, the Oregon Ducks came to Arizona Stadium in a game that would decide which team went to the Rose Bowl. ESPN's College GameDay crew dubbed it as the game of the week and ventured down to Tucson to cover it. After a back and forth battle, the Oregon Ducks won in double overtime 44–41 to clinch the Rose Bowl bid. Arizona was defeated 33–0 by Nebraska in a rematch of the 1998 Holiday Bowl.

Following the Holiday Bowl, offensive coordinator Sonny Dykes left the Wildcat program to become the head coach at Louisiana Tech, and Mark Stoops became the defensive coordinator at Florida State. To replace them, Mike Stoops promoted Bill Bedenbaugh and Seth Littrell to co-offensive coordinators, while promoting Tim Kish to be co-defensive coordinators with Greg Brown, who was hired from Colorado.

Midway through his eighth season, Stoops was fired as head coach on October 10, 2011, after starting the season 1–5 (the sole victory was against FCS Northern Arizona). Including the prior season, the Wildcats under Stoops had lost 10 consecutive games against FBS opponents, with their last victory over a FBS team taking place nearly a year earlier on October 30, 2010, against UCLA. Tim Kish, the team's defensive coordinator, was named interim head coach for the remainder of the season.[1] (Stoops returned to the Sooner program soon thereafter as defensive coordinator; Kish, who had known the Stoops brothers for many years, followed Stoops and joined the Sooner staff as the linebackers coach.)[2]

Rich RodriguezEdit

On November 21, 2011, Arizona announced the hiring of Rich Rodriguez to replace Stoops. Rodriguez previously served as the head football coach at Salem University (1988), Glenville State College (1990–1996), West Virginia (2001–2007), and the University of Michigan (2008–2010); he was also assistant coach, offensive coordinator, and quarterback coach for Tulane University (1997–1998) and Clemson University (1999–2000) (both under head coach Tommy Bowden). Rodriguez was an analyst for CBS Sports during the 2011 football season.

Rodriguez is considered a pioneer of a no huddle, run-oriented version of the spread offense, although a pass-first version was already being implemented by others.[3][4][5] He first developed this offensive approach at Glenville State and refined it during his stops at Tulane with Shaun King, at Clemson with Woodrow Dantzler, and at West Virginia most notably with dual-threat quarterback Pat White. This strategy features frequent use of the shotgun formation. Rodriguez is also credited for inventing the zone read play run out of the shotgun formation.

At West Virginia, Rodriguez guided the Mountaineers to two consecutive bowl games, going to the Nokia Sugar Bowl in 2005 as the Big East champion and its Bowl Championship Series (BCS) representative, defeating Georgia and a gaining a final Associated Press ranking of fifth; the next season the Mountaineers won eleven games, defeated Georgia Tech, 38–35, in the Gator Bowl and finished 10th in the final polls. The 2007 Mountaineers eventually achieved No. 2 in the BCS standings and No. 1 in the Coaches' poll, both the highest position ever for a Mountaineer football team; Rodriguez was hired by Michigan at the end of the regular season in a highly controversial (and legally contested) move,[6] but the Mountaineer team went on to defeat Oklahoma in the Fiesta Bowl under interim head coach Bill Stewart.

Rodriguez' tenure at Michigan was far less successful, as it was plagued by player discontent, NCAA rule violations, lack of major bowl appearances, and a lack of success against Michigan's major traditional rivals such as Ohio State and Michigan State; Rodriguez was relieved of his duties in January 2011, and joined CBS Sports as an analyst soon thereafter, but stated that he might return to coaching if the right opportunity presented itself.

Rodriguez was hired as the 30th head coach of the Arizona football program on November 21, 2011. The hiring was first announced by Arizona athletic director Greg Byrne on Twitter[7] while a press conference officially announcing him as the head coach was held a day later at McKale Center in Tucson. Rodriguez will earn $1.45 million in his first year, $1.5 million in his second, $1.6 million in his third, $1.7 million in his fourth and $1.8 million in his fifth season. He will receive an extra $300,000 per year from Nike, as well as bonuses for academic achievement, BCS rankings, season ticket totals and bowl appearances. He will get extra bonuses for milestones such as playing in the BCS title game, playing in any other bowl, and for winning the Pac-12. The contract is subject to UA Board of Regents approval.[8] Rodriguez' hiring ended a 41-day search for a head coach which started after Mike Stoops was dismissed after eight seasons as Wildcat head coach. Former University of Florida head coach Urban Meyer (who later accepted the head coaching position at Ohio State)[9] and former Texas Tech head coach Mike Leach (who later accepted the head coaching position at Pac-12 school Washington State) were reportedly also considered for the position.

Following West Virginia's victory in the 2012 Orange Bowl, Mountaineers defensive coordinator Jeff Casteel, who coached under Rodriguez during his tenure there, departed WVU's staff to join Rodriguez and become the Wildcats' defensive coordinator. An official announcement, and Casteel's formal introduction to the Tucson media, was made on January 13, 2012. Casteel is considered one of the top defensive coaches in the nation, and considered master of the 3–3–5 "odd stack" defense.[10]

Current RosterEdit

2012 Arizona Wildcats roster
2012 Arizona Wildcats roster from the University of Arizona Athletic Site
 

Quarterbacks

  • 7 B.J. Denker - Junior
  • 9 Javelle Allen - Freshman
  • 10 Matt Scott - Senior
  • 12 Nick Isham - Sophomore/TR
  • 13 Jack Nykaza - Freshman
  • 17 Josh Kern - Freshman
  • 19 Alex Cappellini - Sophomore/TR

Running backs

  • 2 Kylan Butler - Junior
  • 3 Daniel Jenkins - Junior
  • 23 Jared Baker - Redshirt Freshman
  • 25 Ka'Deem Carey - Sophomore
  • 27 Terris Jones - Junior
  • 32 J.T. Washington - Freshman
  • 45 Elliot Taylor - Junior

Fullback

  • 31 Taimi Tutogi - Senior

Wide receivers

  • 4 Dan Buckner -Senior
  • 5 Trey Griffey - Freshman
  • 8 Richard Morrison - Junior
  • 11 Tyler Slain - Sophomore
  • 15 Jarrell Bennett - Freshman
  • 16 Garic Wharton - Sophomore
  • 20 Trevor Ermisch - Sophomore
  • 29 Austin Hill - Sophomore
  • 30 Johnny Jackson - Redshirt Freshman
  • 80 David Richards Redshirt Freshman
  • 81 Clive Georges - Freshman
  • 82 Ademola Adeniran - Sophomore
  • 84 Sean Willet - Junior
  • 89 R.J. Aguero - Freshman
 

Tight ends

  • 18 Terrence Miller - Senior
  • 37 Ben Sullivan - Redshirt Freshman
  • 83 Michael Cooper - Sophomore
  • 87 Drew Robinson -Senior

Offensive linemen

  • 54 Addison Bachman - Senior
  • 59 Beau Boyster - Freshman
  • 60 Carter Lees - Sophomore
  • 61 Cayman Bundage - Freshman
  • 62 Chris Putton - Junior
  • 65 Zach Hemmila - Freshman
  • 67 Jack Baucus - Junior
  • 68 Mickey Baucus - Sophomore
  • 69 Eric Bender-Ramsay - Junior
  • 70 T. D. Gross - Freshman
  • 72 Trace Biskin - Senior
  • 73 Fabbians Ebbele - Sophomore
  • 74 Jacob Arzouman - Redshirt Freshman
  • 75 Shane Zink - Senior
  • 77 Lene Maiava - Redshirt Freshman
  • 79 Trent Spurgeon - Sophomore

Centers

  • 76 Kyle Quinn - Senior
 

Defensive Lines

  • 43 Justin Washington - Junior
  • 52 Dame Ndiaye - Redshirt Freshman
  • 71 Chris Merrill - Senior
  • 75 Kirfi Taula - Sophomore
  • 84 Reggie Gilbert - Sophomore
  • 90 Dan Pettinato - Sophomore
  • 91 Sione Tuihalamaka - Junior
  • 92 Dominique Austin - Senior
  • 93 Lamar De Rego - Senior
  • 94 Christian Upshaw - Senior
  • 95 Jowyn Ward - Senior
  • 96 Willie Mobley - Senior
  • 97 Dwight Melvin - Freshman
  • 98 Tevin Hood - Junior/TR
  • 99 Kyle Kelley - Freshman

Linebackers

  • 3 Keoni Bush-Loo - Freshman
  • 9 C.J. Dozier - Freshman
  • 19 Hank Hobson - Sophomore
  • 23 Dakota Conwell - Freshman
  • 28 Anthony Lopez - Freshman
  • 33 Jake Fischer - Senior
  • 34 Aaron White - Freshman
  • 34 Greg Nwoko - Senior
  • 44 Rob Hankins - Sophomore
  • 47 Shadow Williams - Freshman
  • 53 Sir. Thomas Jackson - Sophomore
  • 56 Tyler Ermisch - Senior
  • 57 Cody Ippolito - Freshman
  • 58 Devin Gordon - Redshirt Freshman

Cornerbacks

  • 1 Bryan Harper - Freshman
  • 4 Patrick Onwuasor - Redshirt Freshman
  • 5 Shaquille Richardson - Junior
  • 6 Johnathan McKnight - Redshirt Sophomore
  • 17 Derrick Rainey - Junior
  • 24 Connor Sohns - Sophomore
  • 26 Jourdon Grandon - Sophomore
  • 29 Justin Samuels - Junior
 

Safeties

  • 2 Marquis Flowers - Junior
  • 7 Mark Watley - Senior
  • 10 Yamen Sanders - Freshman
  • 11 William Parks - Freshman
  • 12 Adam Hall - Senior
  • 15 Wayne Capers Jr. - Freshman
  • 20 Stephen Ascher - Freshman
  • 21 Tra'Mayne Bondurant - Sophomore
  • 27 Jamar Allah - Freshman
  • 35 Clint Cochrane - Freshman
  • 36 Vince Miles - Freshman
  • 37 Keahi Hogan - Sophomore
  • 38 Jared Tevis - Junior
  • 40 Brendan Murphy - Junior/TR
  • 46 Blake Brady - Sophomore

Kickers/Punters

  • 13 Kyle Dugandzic - Senior
  • 15 John Bonano - Senior
  • 39 Drew Riggleman - Sophomore
  • 48 Jaime Salazar - Senior
  • 86 Jake Smith - Junior/TR

Long Snapper

  • 49 Tim Johnston - Freshman
  • 50 Chase Gorham - Sophomore
  • 63 Brian Chacon - Senior

Sources: [1]

Yearly recordsEdit

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs Coaches# AP°
Stuart Forbes (Independent) (1899)
1899 Arizona 1–1–1
Arizona: 1–1–1
William W. Skinner (Independent) (1900–1901)
1900 Arizona 3–1
1901 Arizona 4–1
Arizona: 7–2
Leslie Gillette (Independent) (1902)
1902 Arizona 5–0
Arizona: 5–0
1903 No team
Orin A. Kates (Independent) (1904)
1904 Arizona 3–1–2
Arizona: 3–1–2
William M. Ruthrauff (Independent) (1905)
1905 Arizona 5–2
Arizona: 5–2
1906 No team
1907 No team
H. B. Galbraith (Independent) (1908–1909)
1908 Arizona 5–0
1909 Arizona 3–1
Arizona: 8–1
George F. Shipp (Independent) (1910–1911)
1910 Arizona 5–0
1911 Arizona 3–1–1
Arizona: 8–1–1
Raymond L. Quigley (Independent) (1912)
1912 Arizona 2–1
Arizona: 2–1
Frank A. King (Independent) (1913)
1913 Arizona 2–2
Arizona: 2–2
Pop McKale (Independent) (1914–1930)
1914 Arizona 5–1
1915 Arizona 5–3
1916 Arizona 5–3
1917 Arizona 3–2
1918 No team—World War I
1919 Arizona 7–1
1920 Arizona 6–1
1921 Arizona 7–2
1922 Arizona 6–3
1923 Arizona 5–3
1924 Arizona 2–4
1925 Arizona 3–3–1
1926 Arizona 5–1–1
1927 Arizona 4–2–1
1928 Arizona 5–1–2
1929 Arizona 7–1
1930 Arizona 6–1–1
Arizona: 81–32–6
Fred Enke (Border Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1931)
1931 Arizona 3–5–1 1–1–1 T–2nd
Arizona: 3–5–1 1–1–1
August W. Farwick (Border Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1932)
1932 Arizona 4–5 3–2 2nd
Arizona: 4–5 3–2
Tex Oliver (Border Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1933–1937)
1933 Arizona 5–3 3–2 T–3rd
1934 Arizona 7–2–1 2–1–1 3rd
1935 Arizona 7–2 4–0 1st
1936 Arizona 5–2–3 3–0–1 1st
1937 Arizona 8–2 3–1 3rd
Arizona: 32–11–4 15–4–2
Orian Landreth (Border Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1938)
1938 Arizona 3–6 0–3 6th
Arizona: 3–6 0–3
Miles W. Casteel (Border Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1939–1948)
1939 Arizona 6–4 1–2 5th
1940 Arizona 7–2 3–1 2nd
1941 Arizona 7–3 5–0 1st
1942 Arizona 6–4 4–2 4th
1943 No team—World War II
1944 No team—World War II
1945 Arizona 5–0
1946 Arizona 4–4–2 2–2–1 4th
1947 Arizona 5–4–1 3–2 4th
1948 Arizona 6–5 3–2 T–3rd L Salad
Arizona: 46–26–3 21–11–1
Robert Winslow (Border Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1949–1951)
1949 Arizona 2–7–1 2–4 6th
1950 Arizona 4–6 2–4 6th
1951 Arizona 6–5 4–3 5th
Arizona: 12–18–1 0–3
Warren B. Woodson (Border Conference) (1952–1956)
1952 Arizona 6–4 3–2 3rd
1953 Arizona 4–5–1 3–2 4th
1954 Arizona 7–3 3–2 4th
1955 Arizona 5–4–1 1–2–1 5th
1956 Arizona 4–6 1–2 4th
Arizona: 26–22–2 11–10–1
Ed Doherty (Border Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1957–1958)
1957 Arizona 1–8–1 0–4 T–5th
1958 Arizona 3–7 2–1 3rd
Arizona: 4–15–1 2–5
Jim LaRue (Border Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1959–1961)
1959 Arizona 4–6 2–1 2nd
1960 Arizona 7–3 3–0 2nd
1961 Arizona 8–1–1 17
Jim LaRue (Western Athletic Conference) (1962–1966)
1962 Arizona 5–5 2–2 T–2nd
1963 Arizona 5–5 2–2 T–3rd
1964 Arizona 6–3–1 3–1 T–1st
1965 Arizona 3–7 1–4 6th
1966 Arizona 3–7 1–4 5th
Arizona: 41–37–2 14–13
Darrell Mudra (Western Athletic Conference) (1967–1968)
1967 Arizona 3–6–1 1–4 5th
1968 Arizona 8–3 5–1 T–2nd L Sun
Arizona: 11–9–1 6–5
Bob Weber (Western Athletic Conference) (1969–1972)
1969 Arizona 3–7 3–3 5th
1970 Arizona 4–6 2–4 5th
1971 Arizona 5–6 3–3 3rd
1972 Arizona 4–7 4–3 4th
Arizona: 16–26 12–13
Jim Young (Western Athletic Conference) (1973–1976)
1973 Arizona 8–3 6–1 T–1st
1974 Arizona 9–2 6–1 2nd
1975 Arizona 9–2 5–2 2nd 13 18
1976 Arizona 5–6 3–4 T–5th
Arizona: 31–13 20–8
Tony Mason (Western Athletic Conference) (1977)
1977 Arizona 5–7 3–4 5th
Tony Mason (Pacific-10 Conference) (1978–1979)
1978 Arizona 5–6 3–4 T–6th
1979 Arizona 6–5–1 4–3 T–3rd L Fiesta
Arizona: 16–18–1 10–11
Larry Smith (Pacific-10 Conference) (1980–1986)
1980 Arizona 5–6 3–4 T–6th
1981 Arizona 6–5 4–4 T–6th
1982 Arizona 6–4–1 4–3–1 5th
1983 Arizona 7–3–1 4–3–1 5th
1984 Arizona 7–4 5–2 T–3rd
1985 Arizona 8–3–1 5–2 T–2nd T Sun
1986 Arizona 9–3 5–3 T–4th W Aloha 10 11
Arizona: 48–28–3 30–21–2
Dick Tomey (Pacific-10 Conference) (1987–2000)
1987 Arizona 4–4–3 2–3–3 7th
1988 Arizona 7–4 5–3 T–3rd
1989 Arizona 8–4 5–3 T–2nd W Copper 25
1990 Arizona 7–5 5–4 5th L Aloha
1991 Arizona 4–7 3–5 T–6th
1992 Arizona 6–5–1 4–3–1 5th L John Hancock
1993 Arizona 10–2 6–2 T–1st W Fiesta 9 10
1994 Arizona 8–4 6–2 T–2nd L Freedom 20
1995 Arizona 6–5 4–4 T–5th
1996 Arizona 5–6 3–5 T–5th
1997 Arizona 7–5 4–4 T–5th W Insight.com
1998 Arizona 12–1 7–1 2nd W Holiday 4 4
1999 Arizona 6–6 3–5 T–6th
2000 Arizona 5–6 3–5 T–5th
Arizona: 95–64–4 60–49–4
John Mackovic (Pacific-10 Conference) (2001–2003)
2001 Arizona 5–6 2–6 8th
2002 Arizona 4–8 1–7 T–9th
2003 Arizona 1–4* 0–1*
Arizona: 10–18 3–14 *Fired after 5 games
Mike Hankwitz (Pacific-10 Conference) (2003)
2003 Arizona 1–6[n 1] 1–6[n 1] 10th
Arizona: 1–6 1–6
Mike Stoops/Tim Kish (Pacific-10 Conference/Pacific-12 Conference) (2004–2011)
2004 Arizona 3–8 2–6 T–8th
2005 Arizona 3–8 2–6 8th
2006 Arizona 6–6 4–5 T–5th
2007 Arizona 5–7 4–5 6th
2008 Arizona 8–5 5–4 5th W Las Vegas
2009 Arizona 8–5 6–3 T–2nd L Holiday
2010 Arizona 7–6 4–5 T–5th L Alamo
2011 Arizona 4–8 2–7 11th
Arizona: 44–53 30–41
Rich Rodriguez (Pacific-12 Conference) (2012–present)
2012 Arizona 8–5 4–5 8th W New Mexico
Arizona: 8–5 4–5
Total: 622–483–33
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title
Indicates BCS bowl, Bowl Alliance or Bowl Coalition game. #Rankings from final Coaches' Poll.
°Rankings from final AP Poll.

NotesEdit

  1. "Stoops Relieved of Duties" (Press release). University of Arizona Athletics Department. October 10, 2011. http://www.arizonawildcats.com/sports/m-footbl/spec-rel/101011aaa.html.
  2. Travis Haney (January 25, 2012). "It’s official: Tim Kish will join OU football coaching staff". The Oklahoman. http://newsok.com/article/3643250. Retrieved February 1, 2012.
  3. Lang, Arne. "College Coaching Award". Archived from the original on 20 November 2006. http://web.archive.org/web/20061120172120/http://www.theprescription.com/blog_college-football-coaching-award.php.
  4. Davie, Bob. "Football 101: Mountaineers spread the wealth". http://insider.espn.go.com/ncf/insider/columns/story?columnist=davie&id=2457483.
  5. May, Tim. "College football: Spread option remains in vogue". http://www.columbusdispatch.com/dispatch/content/sports/stories/2007/08/09/osufb09.ART_ART_08-09-07_C1_L37IN06.html. Retrieved 2007-08-09.
  6. "Michigan will pay $2.5 million toward Rodriguez's buyout – Michigan Wolverines Football: News, Blogs, Photos, Audio & Video". MLive.com. 9 July 2008. http://www.mlive.com/wolverines/football/index.ssf/2008/07/michigan_will_pay_25_million_t.html. Retrieved 2010-09-21.
  7. https://twitter.com/#!/Greg_Byrne/status/138777752001187840
  8. Finley, Patrick (22 November 2011). "UA football: Rodriguez's goal is 'win Rose Bowl'". Arizona Daily Star. http://azstarnet.com/sports/blogs/pac12pundit/ua-football-rodriguez-s-goal-is-win-rose-bowl/article_3990cef8-1544-11e1-a26f-001cc4c03286.html.
  9. Thamel, Pete (15 November 2011). "Meyer Discusses and Dismisses Arizona Job". The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/16/sports/ncaafootball/urban-meyer-discusses-and-dismisses-arizona-job.html?_r=3&src=tp.
  10. Ryan Finley (January 14, 2012). "UA football: Arizona football: Casteel leaves roots, takes pay cut to fix UA defense". Arizona Daily Star. http://azstarnet.com/sports/football/college/wildcats/arizona-football-casteel-leaves-roots-takes-pay-cut-to-fix/article_3b9339f4-d69e-5cec-8f94-87d17f9da43e.html. Retrieved January 14, 2012.

Arizona has won 10 or more football games in a season only twice in its history, and not once this Millennium.

Conference titlesEdit

Year Conference Coach Record
1935BorderTex Oliver7–2–0
1936BorderTex Oliver5–2–3
1941BorderMiles W. Casteel7–3–0
1964WACJim LaRue6–3–1
1973WACJim Young8–3–0
1993Pac-10***Dick Tomey10–2–0
Conference Titles 6

Note: bold years indicate outright conference titles ***Co-Championship, shared with UCLA, who defeated Arizona by 20 points in their only head-to-head matchup. Arizona has yet to win an outright Pac-10/12 conference championship.

Bowl gamesEdit

Arizona is the only school of the original PAC 10 to never have participated in a Rose Bowl; the conference's major bowl game.[1]

Date Bowl W/L Opponent PF PA
December 26, 1921 East-West Christmas Classic L Centre 0 38
January 1, 1949 Salad L Drake 13 14
December 28, 1968 Sun L Auburn 10 34
December 25, 1979 Fiesta L Pittsburgh 10 16
December 28, 1985 Sun T Georgia 13 13
December 27, 1986 Aloha W North Carolina 30 21
December 31, 1989 Copper W NC State 17 10
December 25, 1990 Aloha L Syracuse 0 28
December 31, 1992 Sun L Baylor 15 20
January 1, 1994 Fiesta W Miami 29 0
December 27, 1994 Freedom L Utah 13 16
December 27, 1997 Insight.com W New Mexico 20 14
December 30, 1998 Holiday W Nebraska 23 20
December 20, 2008 Las Vegas W BYU 31 21
December 30, 2009 Holiday L Nebraska 0 33
December 29, 2010 Alamo L Oklahoma State 10 36
December 15, 2012 New Mexico W Nevada 49 48
Total 17 Bowl Games 7–9–1 283 437

Trophy gamesEdit

Logos and uniformsEdit

Starting in the 2010 season, Arizona wore new uniforms. They are simplified versions of the uniforms worn from 2005–2009, with the addition of a white helmet with a red-white-blue stripe. The team may use any combination of its two helmets, three jerseys and three pants. On September 29, 2012 the Wildcats will unveil a new copper helmet.

Game day traditionsEdit

  • The Wildcat Walk, first done in 2010, is one of Arizona's newest traditions. Before every home game, the team's buses take them from their hotel and drop them off several blocks north of the stadium. The fans and the marching band line Cherry Avenue as the team walks to the stadium.
  • During pre-game warmups, the team performs a haka. Starting in 2012, the team will perform the haka in front of the student section, where students will also do the haka.[2]
  • At the beginnings of the second and fourth quarters, the cheerleaders lead the crowd in a synchronized U of A chant. The east side of the stadium yells "U!", the north and south sides yell "of!" and the west side yells "A!"
  • At the beginning of the second half, for the duration of the kickoff, a large block A banner is unfurled and held up by the center of the Zona Zoo.
  • At the end of the third quarter, the team and many members of the crowd hold up four fingers, signifying the beginning of the fourth quarter.
  • In a similar tradition to other schools' mascots, after every Arizona score, Wilbur the Wildcat does as many pushups as the Wildcats have points while the crowd counts his pushups. However, unlike other mascots, Wilbur does his pushups one-handed.
  • At the end of every home game (and every Arizona athletics event the band is present at) the band plays Arizona's alma mater, "All Hail, Arizona!" Students and fans link arms, sway as they sing and jump up and down while singing the last part of the song.
  • After every home game, fans and the band march to the administration building where the band performs a concert for the gathered fans. At the conclusion of the concert, the bell in the student union clock tower (one of the bells recovered from the USS Arizona) is rung, and the band responds by yelling "Bear Down!"

Individual award winnersEdit

  • Pac-10 Coach of the Year
Dick Tomey – 1992
  • Pac-10 Defensive Player of the Year
Ricky Hunley – 1983
Byron Evans – 1986
Chuck Cecil – 1987
Dana Wells – 1988
Darryl Lewis – 1990
Rob Waldrop – 1993
Tedy Bruschi – 1995
  • Pac-10 Rookie of the Year
Mike Thomas – 2005
Rob Waldrop1993
Rob Waldrop1993
Darryll Lewis1990[3]
Antoine Cason2007
Steve McLaughlin1994[4]
Chris McAlister1998
Rob Waldrop1993[5]

All-AmericansEdit

  • 2012– Ka'Deem Carey, Arizona (CBS Sports, Athlon Sports, Scout.com, Sporting News, Walter Camp, Lindy's, Associated Press)
  • 2008– Rob Gronkowski, Arizona (Associated Press)
  • 2007– Antoine Cason, Arizona (Associated Press, Walter Camp, Sporting News, Sports Illustrated, ESPN, CBS Sports, College Football News, Rivals.com, Scout.com)
  • 2005– Danny Baugher, Arizona (Pro Football Weekly)
  • 1999– Dennis Northcutt, Arizona (AFCA)
  • 1999– Dennis Northcutt, Arizona (AP, FWAA, CNNSI-AP)
  • 1998– Chris McAlister, Arizona (AFCA, AP, FWAA, TSN, Walter Camp, FN)
  • 1995– Tedy Bruschi, Arizona (AP, UPI, Walter Camp, AFCA-Coaches, FWAA-Writers, TSN)
  • 1994– Tedy Bruschi, Arizona (Associated Press, Walter Camp, FWAA-Writers, AFCA-Coaches, Scripps-Howard, Sporting News)
  • 1994– Tony Bouie, Arizona (Walter Camp, AFCA-Coaches, Sporting News)
  • 1994– Steve McLaughlin, Arizona (Walter Camp, FWAA-Writers, Scripps-Howard, Sporting News)
  • 1993– Rob Waldrop, Arizona (AP, UPI, WC, FWAA, AFCA, SH, TSN, FN)
  • 1993– Sean Harris, Arizona (SH)
  • 1992– Rob Waldrop, Arizona (AP, UPI, NEA, FWAA)
  • 1992– Josh Miller, Arizona (FWAA, TSN)
  • 1990– Darryl Lewis, Arizona (AP, UPI, WC, AFCA, FWAA, TSN, FN)
  • 1987– Chuck Cecil, Arizona (UPI, WC, AFCA)
  • 1985– Allen Durden, Arizona (UPI, WC)
  • 1983– Ricky Hunley, Arizona (AP, UPI, NEA, WC, AFCA, FWAA)
  • 1982– Ricky Hunley, Arizona (AP, UPI, AFCA)
  • 1976– Mike Dawson, Arizona
  • 1975– Theo Bell, Arizona (NEA)
  • 1971– Mark Arneson, Arizona (TSN)
  • 1941– Hank Stanton, Arizona
  • 1938– Tom Greenfield, Arizona
  • 1937– Walt Nielson, Arizona
  • 1935– Ted Bland, Arizona

Retired jerseysEdit

Retired Football Jerseys

Art
Luppino
22
1952–1956

John
"Button"
Salmon
1923–1926

College Football Hall of FamersEdit

Ed Brown Guard(Offense-Defense) 1997 1954–1958
Chuck Cecil Defensive back 2009 1984–1987
Ricky Hunley Linebacker 1997 1980–1983
Darrell Mudra Head Coach 2000 1967–1968
Warren B. Woodson Head Coach 1989 1952–1956
Jim Young Head Coach 1999 1973–1976
Rob Waldrop defensive lineman 2011 1990–1993

All-Star alumni in NFL and CFLEdit

NFL John Fina - Offensive Tackle - Buffalo Bills

All-Pro (1996, 1997, 1998 1999, 2000) NFL 1990s All-Decade Team

Future schedulesEdit

2013Edit

Date Time Opponent Site Result
September 7* at UNLV Sam Boyd StadiumLas Vegas, Nevada    
September 14* UTSA Arizona StadiumTucson, AZ    
*Non-Conference Game. Homecoming. #Rankings from Coaches' Poll released prior to game.

2014Edit

Date Time Opponent Site Result
August 30* at UNLV Arizona Stadium • Tucson, Arizona    
September 6* at UTSA AlamodomeSan Antonio, Texas    
September 13* Nevada Arizona Stadium • Tucson, Arizona    
*Non-Conference Game. Homecoming. #Rankings from Coaches' Poll released prior to game.

2015Edit

Date Time Opponent Site Result
September 5* UTSA Arizona Stadium • Tucson, Arizona    
September 12* at Nevada Mackay StadiumReno, Nevada    
*Non-Conference Game. Homecoming. #Rankings from Coaches' Poll released prior to game.

2019Edit

Date Time Opponent Site Result
August 31, 2019* at Hawaii Aloha StadiumHonolulu, Hawaii    
*Non-Conference Game. Homecoming. #Rankings from Coaches' Poll released prior to game.

2020Edit

Date Time Opponent Site Result
September 5, 2020* Hawaii Arizona Stadium • Tucson, Arizona    
*Non-Conference Game. Homecoming. #Rankings from Coaches' Poll released prior to game.

Future non-conference opponents Edit

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
vs Toledo at UNLV vs UNLV vs UTSA at Hawaii vs Hawaii
vs Oklahoma State vs UTSA at UTSA at Nevada
vs South Carolina State vs Nevada

[6]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit


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