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Alvin Bell
175px
Bell c. 1922
Vanderbilt Commodores
Forward
Quarterback (football)
Personal information
Born(1901-10-01)October 1, 1901
Little Rock, Arkansas
DiedJune 1968 (1968-07) (aged 66)
Little Rock, Arkansas
Listed weight150 lb (68 kg)
Career information
High schoolLittle Rock
CollegeVanderbilt University (1920–1923)
Career highlights and awards
Championships
  • 3 Southern (football) (1921, 1922, 1923)

Honors

  • All-Southern
  • Arkansas Sports Hall of Fame

Alvin Euclid "Pep" Bell (October 1, 1901 – June 1968)[1] was an American football and basketball player, who later was a football official for 36 years.

Early yearsEdit

Alvin Bell was born October 1, 1901 in Little Rock, Arkansas to William Euclid Bell and Josephine Kirst.[2]

Playing yearsEdit

Bell won 14 letters at Little Rock High School.[3] He set a then record with 8 touchdowns in a game in 1919.[4] Bell went to Vanderbilt University. His best sport was basketball, where he was selected All-Southern.[3] Bell was a starter the first time Vanderbilt met Tennessee in basketball in 1922.[5] He was said to have "played a hard floor game and started most of Vanderbilt's rallies." Bell also was captain for the 1923–24 team coached by Josh Cody and featuring Lynn Bomar and Gil Reese.[6] That team was beaten in the Southern Conference tournament in the quarterfinals by the eventual champion, Jack Cobb and Cartwright Carmichael led North Carolina, 37–20.[7] On the football team he was the backup quarterback to Doc Kuhn. At Vanderbilt, Bell was a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity.[8]

OfficialEdit

Bell worked mainly in the Southwest Conference and Southeastern Conference, being referee-in-chief of both.[8] He officiated in four Sugar Bowl games, three Cotton Bowl games, one Orange Bowl, and eight Blue–Gray Games; and the 1936 U.S. Olympic basketball trials.[3][8] Bell was inducted into the Arkansas Sports Hall of Fame posthumously in 1978.[3]

ReferencesEdit

  1. U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935–2014 [database on-line] Number: 430-07-2987; Issue State: Arkansas; Issue Date: Before 1951.
  2. Fred Hiner Dale (1941). A history of the Michael Reasor and allied families. p. 221. https://books.google.com/books?id=uktMAAAAMAAJ&q=%22alvin+bell%22+football&dq=%22alvin+bell%22+football&hl=en&sa=X&ei=x8VIVLy9IJLpggSU_IAw&ved=0CCMQ6AEwAQ.
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 "Class of 1978". Archived from the original on April 17, 2016. https://web.archive.org/web/20160417195305/http://www.arksportshalloffame.com/inductees/.
  4. "Arkansas RB scores 10 touchdowns in 73-72 loss". October 15, 2006. http://lubbockonline.com/stories/101506/hig_101506059.shtml.
  5. Bill Traughber (February 11, 2009). "VU/UT first met in 1922". http://www.vucommodores.com/sports/m-baskbl/spec-rel/021109aac.html?wappref=std.
  6. Roy M. Neel. Dynamite! 75 Years of Vanderbilt Basketball. pp. 44, 244. https://books.google.com/books?ei=qstIVIjCKonoggTYs4LwBA&id=flV_WA8hzzoC&dq=%22pep+bell%22+football&focus=searchwithinvolume&q=%22pep+bell%22+.
  7. "History of the Early Southern Conference Atlanta Basketball Tournament". Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. https://web.archive.org/web/20160304002055/http://www.bigbluehistory.net/bb/SC/1924.html. Retrieved February 6, 2015.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 Sigma Alpha Epsilon (1960). "Alvin Bell". The Record (Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity) 80 (1): 168. https://books.google.com/books?id=28vmAAAAMAAJ&q=%22alvin+bell%22+football&dq=%22alvin+bell%22+football&hl=en&sa=X&ei=KMlIVOLNEYLFggT-zYHgCA&ved=0CDUQ6AEwBQ.

Template:1921 Vanderbilt Commodores football navboxTemplate:1922 Vanderbilt Commodores football navbox

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