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2003 Michigan Wolverines football
Big Ten Champions
Rose Bowl, L 14–28 vs. USC
ConferenceBig Ten Conference
Ranking
CoachesNo. 7
APNo. 6
2003 record10–3 (7–1 Big Ten)
Head coachLloyd Carr (9th season)
Offensive coordinatorTerry Malone (2nd season)
Offensive schemeMultiple
Defensive coordinatorJim Herrmann (7th season)
Base defenseMultiple
MVPChris Perry
CaptainGrant Bowman
CaptainCarl Diggs
CaptainJohn Navarre
Home stadiumMichigan Stadium
(Capacity: 107,501)
Seasons
← 2002
2004 →
2003 Big Ten football standings
v · d · e Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
#6/7 Michigan   7 1         10 3  
#4/4 Ohio State   6 2         11 2  
#18/19 Purdue   6 2         9 4  
#8/8 Iowa   5 3         10 3  
#20/17 Minnesota   5 3         10 3  
Michigan State   5 3         8 5  
Wisconsin   4 4         7 6  
Northwestern   4 4         6 7  
Penn State   0* 7         0* 9  
Indiana   1 7         2 10  
Illinois   0 8         1 11  
† – BCS representative as champion
‡ – BCS at-large representative

The 2003 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 2003 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team's head coach was Lloyd Carr. The Wolverines played their home games at Michigan Stadium. The team won the first of its back to back Big Ten Championships.[1] The team lost to the USC Trojans in 2004 Rose Bowl.[2]

ScheduleEdit

Date Time Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result Attendance
August 30, 2003* 12:10 PM Central Michigan #4/7 Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI ESPN+ W 45–7   110,637
September 6, 2003* 12:00 PM Houston #5/7 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI ESPN W 50–3   109,580
September 13, 2003* 3:30 PM #15/14 Notre Dame #5/7 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI (Rivalry) ABC W 38–0   111,726
September 20, 2003* 3:30 PM at #22/22 Oregon #3/5 Autzen StadiumEugene, OR ABC L 31–27   59,023
September 27, 2003 12:10 PM Indiana #11/10 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI ESPN+ W 31–17   110,788
October 4, 2003 2:30 PM at #23/19 Iowa #9/11 Kinnick StadiumIowa City, IA ABC L 30–27   70,397
October 10, 2003 7:00 PM at #17/13 Minnesota #20/18 Hubert H. Humphrey MetrodomeMinneapolis, MN (Little Brown Jug) ESPN W 38–35   62,374
October 18, 2003† 12:00 PM Illinois #17/17 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI ESPN+ W 56–14   110,231
October 25, 2003 3:30 PM #10/10 Purdue #13/15 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI ABC W 31–3   111,349
November 1, 2003 12:00 PM at #9/10 Michigan State #11/12 Spartan StadiumEast Lansing, MI (Paul Bunyan Trophy) ABC W 27–20   75,129
November 15, 2003 2:30 PM at Northwestern #5/5 Ryan FieldEvanston, IL ESPN W 41–10   40,681
November 22, 2003 12:00 PM #4/4 Ohio State #5/5 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI (The Game) ABC W 35–21   112,118
January 1, 2004* 2:00 PM vs. #1/1 USC #4/4 Rose BowlPasadena, CA (Rose Bowl) ABC L 28–14   93,849
*Non-Conference Game. Homecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll / Coaches' Poll released prior to game. All times are in Eastern Time.

Game notesEdit

Notre DameEdit

by Quarter1234 Total
Notre Dame 0 0 0 0 0
Michigan 7 10 7 14 38


MinnesotaEdit

by Quarter1234 Total
Michigan 0 0 7 31 38
Minnesota 7 7 14 7 35


PurdueEdit

by Quarter1234 Total
Purdue 0 0 3 0 3
Michigan 14 0 7 10 31


Michigan StateEdit

by Quarter1234 Total
Michigan 0 13 7 7 27
Michigan State 0 3 7 10 20


Ohio StateEdit

by Quarter1234 Total
Ohio State 0 7 7 7 21
Michigan 7 14 7 7 35


Statistical achievementsEdit

Chris Perry was the Big Ten rushing individual statistical champion (126.8 yards per conference games and 128.8 yards per game).[3] Perry set numerous current school records during the season including single-game attempts (51, November 1, 2003) surpassing Ron Johnson's 1967 record of 42, and single-season attempts (338) surpassing Anthony Thomas' 2000 record of 319.[4]

The team led the Big Ten in passing offense for all games (270.8 yards per game), although Michigan State won the title for conference games.[5] They were also the Big Ten scoring statistical champions for conference games (35.8 points per game), although Minnesota was the champion for all games.[6] They also ranked first in passing efficiency defense for both conference games (96.6) and all games (102.2).[7] The team led the conference in total defense for conference games (286.1) and all games (316.4).[7] The November 22 Michigan - Ohio State football rivalry game set the current conference single-game attendance record of 112,118.[8]

Braylon Edwards posted four consecutive 100-yard reception games, surpassing Desmond Howard, Carter and Marcus Knight who all had three in various seasons. Edwards would tie this record the following season, but Mario Manningham posted six in 2007 to establish the current record.[9] John Navarre set numerous career records: pass attempts (1366) extending his own record established the prior season; completions (765), surpassing Elvis Grbac's 1992 record of 522; passing yards (9254), surpassing Grbac's 6460. Chad Henne broke each of these records during his career ending in 2007. Navarre also broke his own single-season records for pass attempts (456), completions (270) and yards (3331) set the prior season. Navarre broke Tom Brady's single-game passing yards record of 375 with a 389-yard performance on October 4 against Iowa. These single-game and single-season records still stand. The final touchdown pass of his career gave him 72, one more than Grbac for another record to be broken by Henne. Navarre established the current records for single-season yards per game (256.2), surpassing his own record of the prior year, and career yards per game (215.2), surpassing Jim Harbaugh's 175.8. He broke his own single-season 200-yard game record with 10 bringing his record setting career total to 28.[10]

Awards and honorsEdit

The individuals in the sections below earned recognition for meritorious performances.[11][12]

NationalEdit

ConferenceEdit

TeamEdit

  • Co-captains: Grant Bowman, Carl Diggs, John Navarre
  • Most Valuable Player: Chris Perry
  • Meyer Morton Award: Braylon Edwards
  • John Maulbetsch Award: Jake Long
  • Frederick Matthei Award: Jason Avant
  • Dick Katcher Award: Grant Bowman, Norman Heuer, Larry Stevens
  • Arthur Robinson Scholarship Award: Andy Mingery
  • Hugh Rader Jr. Award: David Baas, Tony Pape
  • Robert P. Ufer Award: John Navarre
  • Roger Zatkoff Award: Lawrence Reid
  • Dick Katcher Award: Grant Bowman, Norman Heuer, Larry Stevens

Coaching staffEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2010. p. 69. http://www.bigten.org/auto_pdf/p_hotos/s_chools/big10/sports/m-footbl/auto_pdf/FullFBMG. Retrieved July 8, 2010.
  2. "2009 Division I Football Records Book: Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) Records". National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 84. http://web1.ncaa.org/web_files/stats/football_records/DI/2009/2009FBS.pdf. Retrieved July 9, 2010.
  3. "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2009. pp. 51–2. http://www.bigten.org/auto_pdf/p_hotos/s_chools/big10/sports/m-footbl/auto_pdf/FullFBMG. Retrieved July 10, 2010.
  4. "Record Book". CBS Interactive. January 5, 2009. p. 114. http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/mich/sports/m-baskbl/auto_pdf/fbl-record-100509.pdf. Retrieved July 10, 2010.
  5. "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2009. p. 55. http://www.bigten.org/auto_pdf/p_hotos/s_chools/big10/sports/m-footbl/auto_pdf/FullFBMG. Retrieved July 10, 2010.
  6. "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2009. p. 56. http://www.bigten.org/auto_pdf/p_hotos/s_chools/big10/sports/m-footbl/auto_pdf/FullFBMG. Retrieved July 10, 2010.
  7. 7.0 7.1 "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2009. p. 57. http://www.bigten.org/auto_pdf/p_hotos/s_chools/big10/sports/m-footbl/auto_pdf/FullFBMG. Retrieved July 10, 2010.
  8. "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2009. p. 64. http://www.bigten.org/auto_pdf/p_hotos/s_chools/big10/sports/m-footbl/auto_pdf/FullFBMG. Retrieved July 10, 2010.
  9. "Record Book". CBS Interactive. January 5, 2009. pp. 124–125. http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/mich/sports/m-baskbl/auto_pdf/fbl-record-100509.pdf. Retrieved July 10, 2010.
  10. "Record Book". CBS Interactive. January 5, 2009. pp. 120–123. http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/mich/sports/m-baskbl/auto_pdf/fbl-record-100509.pdf. Retrieved July 10, 2010.
  11. "2003 Football Team". The Regents of the University of Michigan. April 9, 2007. http://bentley.umich.edu/athdept/football/fbteam/2003fbt.htm. Retrieved July 10, 2010.
  12. "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide". CBS Interactive/Big Ten Conference. January 5, 2009. pp. 70–82. http://www.bigten.org/auto_pdf/p_hotos/s_chools/big10/sports/m-footbl/auto_pdf/FullFBMG. Retrieved July 10, 2010.

External linksEdit

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