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1972 Oklahoma Sooners football
Sugar Bowl Champions
Big 8 Champions
Sugar Bowl, W 14–0 vs. Penn State
ConferenceBig 8 Conference
Ranking
CoachesNo. 2
APNo. 2
1972 record11–1, 8–4 (6–1, 3–4 Big 8)
Head coachChuck Fairbanks (6th season)
Offensive coordinatorBarry Switzer (7th season)
Offensive schemeWishbone
Defensive coordinatorLarry Lacewell (3rd season)
Home stadiumOklahoma Memorial Stadium (Capacity: 61,836)
Seasons
← 1971
1973 →
1972 Big 8 football standings
v · d · e Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#2 Oklahoma 6 1 0     11 1 0
#4 Nebraska 5 1 1     9 2 1
#16 Colorado 4 3 0     8 4 0
Oklahoma State 4 3 0     6 5 0
Missouri 3 4 0     6 6 0
Iowa State 2 4 1     5 6 1
Kansas 2 5 0     4 7 0
Kansas State 1 6 0     3 8 0
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1972 Oklahoma Sooners football team represented the University of Oklahoma in the college football 1972 NCAA Division I-A season. Oklahoma Sooners football participated in the former Big Eight Conference at that time and played its home games in Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium where it has played its home games since 1923.[1] The team posted a 11–1 overall record and a 6–1 conference record, which were later changed to 8–4 overall record and a 3–4.[2][3] This was Chuck Fairbanks' last season as Sooner head coach.[2]

There is actually a discrepancy as to the Sooners' record. The NCAA never officially forced Oklahoma to forfeit games, having only penalized scholarships, TV appearances, bowl appearances, etc.[4] Oklahoma had used players (including Kerry Jackson, the teams first black quarterback) with falsified transcripts and at one point volunteered to forfeit all its games.[5] Eventually, the Big Eight conference asked them to forfeit three victories despite the fact that the NCAA still recognizes them.[6]

The team was led by four All-Americans: Rod Shoate (Oklahoma's second three-time All-American),[7] Greg Pruitt,[8] Tom Brahaney[9] and Derland Moore.[10] This was the first season that the Selmon brothers Lucious, Lee Roy and Dewey, who would all become All-Americans,[11] anchored the defensive line for Oklahoma. The team played a schedule that included seven ranked opponents (In order, #10 Texas, #9 Colorado, #14 Iowa State, #14 Missouri, #5 Nebraska, #20 Oklahoma State, and #5 Penn State). Four of these opponents finished the season ranked. The team only loss on the field was in the fifth game against Colorado. The team concluded its season with a victory over Penn State in the Sugar Bowl.[3]

Pruitt led the team in rushing with 1024 yards, Dave Robertson led the team in passing with 1136 yards, Tinker Owens led the team in receiving for the first of what would become four consecutive seasons with 430 yards, Pruitt led the team in scoring with 86 points, Shoate led the team in tackles with 145, and Dan Ruster led the team in interceptions with 7.[12]

The team twice posted 37 first downs, which was a school record that stood for 16 seasons.[13]

ScheduleEdit

Date Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result Attendance
September 16* Utah State #4 Oklahoma Memorial StadiumNorman, OK W 49–0   62,546[14]
September 23* Oregon #2 Oklahoma Memorial Stadium • Norman, OK W 68–3   62,240[14]
September 30* Clemson #2 Oklahoma Memorial Stadium • Norman, OK W 52–3   61,210[14]
October 14* vs. #10 Texas #2 Cotton BowlDallas, TX (Red River Shootout) ABC W 27–0   72,032[14]
October 21 at #9 Colorado #2 Folsom FieldBoulder, CO ABC L 14–20   52,022[14]
October 28 Kansas State #8 Oklahoma Memorial Stadium • Norman, OK W 52–0   61,451[14]
November 4 at #14 Iowa State #7 Clyde Williams FieldAmes, IA W 20–6   34,941[14]
November 11 #14 Missouri #7 Oklahoma Memorial Stadium • Norman, OK (Tiger-Sooner Peace Pipe) W 17–6   62,267[14]
November 18 at Kansas #4 Memorial StadiumLawrence, KS W 31–7   37,356[14]
November 23 at #5 Nebraska #4 Memorial StadiumLincoln, NE (Rivalry) ABC W 17–14   76,587[14]
December 2 #20 Oklahoma State #3 Oklahoma Memorial Stadium • Norman, OK (Bedlam Series) W 38–15   62,363[14]
December 31 vs. #5 Penn State #2 Tulane StadiumNew Orleans, LA (Sugar Bowl) ABC W 14–0   80,123[14]
*Non-Conference Game. Homecoming. #Rankings from Coaches' Poll released prior to game. All times are in Central Time.
[15]

Game notesEdit

ClemsonEdit

by Quarter1234 Total
Clemson 0 0 0 3 3
Oklahoma 7 17 21 7 52
[16]


KansasEdit

by Quarter1234 Total
Oklahoma 7 10 14 0 31
Kansas 0 0 7 0 7

[17]


Awards & HonorsEdit

Team players drafted into the NFLEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. "Memorial Stadium". CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on June 28, 2010. http://web.archive.org/web/20100628213311/http://www.soonersports.com/facilities/memorial-stadium_history.html. Retrieved June 30, 2010.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "OU Football Tradition". CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on June 22, 2010. http://web.archive.org/web/20100622232057/http://www.soonersports.com/sports/m-footbl/archive/m-footbl-conf-titles.html. Retrieved June 30, 2010.
  3. 3.0 3.1 "1972 Football Season". SoonerStats.com. http://www.soonerstats.com/football/seasons/schedule.cfm?SeasonID=1972. Retrieved July 2, 2010.
  4. Brant, Tim (January 11, 2008). "After Further Review...The NCAA Weighs In". WJLA/NewsChannel 8. http://www.wjla.com/blogs/sports/after_further_review..._the_ncaa_weighs-in_on_bowden_and_paterno.html. Retrieved July 2, 2010.
  5. Cronley, Jay (April 30, 1973). "Oklahoma Penalty: Illegal Procedure: Admitting that Quarterback Kerry Jackson's high school transcript was altered, the Sooners forfeited eight of their 1972 wins". Sports Illustrated. http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1087283/index.htm. Retrieved July 2, 2010.
  6. Edwards, Mark (June 13, 2009). "Forfeits, Voids, Vacations Make Mess of Records". Decatur Daily. http://www.decaturdaily.com/detail/36824.html. Retrieved July 2, 2010.
  7. 7.0 7.1 "All-American: Rod Shoate". CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on May 25, 2010. http://web.archive.org/web/20100525073705/http://www.soonersports.com/sports/m-footbl/archive/aa-rod-shoate-1972-73-74.html. Retrieved July 2, 2010.
  8. 8.0 8.1 "All-American: Greg Pruitt". CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on May 25, 2010. http://web.archive.org/web/20100525145601/http://www.soonersports.com/sports/m-footbl/archive/aa-greg-pruitt-1971-72.html. Retrieved July 2, 2010.
  9. 9.0 9.1 "All-American: Tom Brahaney". CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on May 25, 2010. http://web.archive.org/web/20100525150402/http://www.soonersports.com/sports/m-footbl/archive/aa-tom-brahaney-1971-72.html. Retrieved July 2, 2010.
  10. 10.0 10.1 "All-American: Derland Moore". CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on May 25, 2010. http://web.archive.org/web/20100525215714/http://www.soonersports.com/sports/m-footbl/archive/aa-derland-moore-1972.html. Retrieved July 2, 2010.
  11. "OU Football Tradition - All-Americans". CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on June 28, 2010. http://web.archive.org/web/20100628213711/http://www.soonersports.com/sports/m-footbl/archive/m-footbl-all-americans.html. Retrieved July 2, 2010.
  12. "2009 Football Record Book". Big12sports.com. p. 164. http://www.big12sports.com/fls/10410/pdfs/football/record_book.pdf?&DB_OEM_ID=10410. Retrieved July 2, 2010.
  13. "2009 Football Record Book". Big 12 Conference. p. 164. http://www.big12sports.com/fls/10410/pdfs/football/record_book.pdf?&DB_OEM_ID=10410. Retrieved July 1, 2010.
  14. 14.00 14.01 14.02 14.03 14.04 14.05 14.06 14.07 14.08 14.09 14.10 14.11 http://www.soonerstats.com/football/seasons/schedule.cfm?seasonid=1972
  15. http://cfreference.net/cfr/school.s?id=382&season=1972
  16. "Sooners again." Eugene Register-Guard. October 1, 1972
  17. Eugene Register-Guard. 1972 November 19.
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