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1938 Tennessee Volunteers football
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National Champions (various selectors)
SEC Champions
Orange Bowl, W 17–0 vs. Oklahoma
Conference Southeastern Conference
Ranking
AP #2
1938 record 11–0 (7–0 SEC)
Head coach Robert Neyland (12th year)
Base defense Single-wing
Home stadium Shields-Watkins Field
Seasons
« 1937 1939 »
1938 SEC football standings
v · d · e Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#2 Tennessee 7 0 0     11 0 0
#13 Alabama 4 1 1     7 1 1
#19 Tulane 4 1 1     7 2 1
Ole Miss 3 2 0     9 2 0
Georgia Tech 2 1 3     3 4 3
Vanderbilt 4 3 0     6 3 0
Florida 2 2 1     4 6 1
Auburn 3 3 1     4 5 1
Georgia 1 2 1     5 4 1
LSU 2 4 0     6 4 0
Mississippi State 1 4 0     4 6 0
Kentucky 0 4 0     2 7 0
Sewanee 0 6 0     1 8 0
† – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1938 Tennessee Volunteers football team represented the University of Tennessee in the 1938 college football season. Head coach Robert Neyland fielded his third team at Tennessee after returning from active duty in the United States Army. The 1938 Tennessee Volunteers won the school's first national championship and are regarded as one of the greatest teams in SEC and NCAA history.

In 1938, The Vols went 10–0 in the regular season and then shut out fellow unbeaten Oklahoma in the Orange Bowl, 17–0, snapping the Sooners' 14-game win streak and beginning a long winning streak for Neyland. Tennessee was selected by a majority of polls and selectors as the national champions with 24 crowning the Vols.[1] Heisman Trophy winner Davey O'Brien and his undefeated TCU Horned Frogs were second with 14.

The 1938 Volunteers were the first of three consecutive Tennessee squads that had undefeated regular seasons. Tennessee won three consecutive conference titles before Neyland left for military service in World War II in 1941. Tennessee also began a historic streak in 1938. By shutting out their last four regular season opponents, the Vols began a streak of 17 consecutive regular season shutouts and 71 consecutive shutout quarters, still NCAA records. Athlon Sports has named the 1938 Tennessee team as the third best college football team of all time.[2]

Prominent playersEdit

The Vols featured three All American performers. Bob Suffridge was an All American at guard, while Bowden Wyatt earned his spot on the team as an end. George Cafego carried the ball as a tailback.

ScheduleEdit

Date Opponent# Rank# Site Result
September 24, 1938 Sewanee Shields-Watkins FieldKnoxville, TN W 26–3  
October 1, 1938* Clemson Shields-Watkins Field • Knoxville, TN W 20–7  
October 8, 1938 Auburn Shields-Watkins Field • Knoxville, TN W 7–0  
October 15, 1938 at Alabama Legion FieldBirmingham, AL (Third Saturday in October) W 13–0  
October 22, 1938* The Citadel #8 Shields-Watkins Field • Knoxville, TN W 44–0  
October 29, 1938† LSU #8 Shields-Watkins Field • Knoxville, TN W 14–6  
November 5, 1938* Chattanooga #6 Shields-Watkins Field • Knoxville, TN W 45–0  
November 12, 1938 at Vanderbilt #4 Dudley FieldNashville, TN W 14–0  
November 24, 1938 Kentucky #4 Shields-Watkins Field • Knoxville, TN W 46–0  
December 3, 1938 vs. Mississippi State #4 Crump StadiumMemphis, TN W 47–0  
January 2, 1939* vs. #4 Oklahoma #2 Burdine StadiumMiami, FL (Orange Bowl) W 17–0  
*Non-Conference Game. Homecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll released prior to game. All times are in Eastern Time.

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit

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