FANDOM



1934 Detroit Lions season
Head Coach Potsy Clark
Home Field University of Detroit Stadium
Results
Record 10–3
Place 2nd NFL Western
Playoff Finish did not qualify
Timeline
Previous season Next season
1933 (Port. Spartans) 1935

The 1934 Detroit Lions season was the fifth season in franchise history. It was the first season the team played in Detroit; the franchise had previously played as the Portsmouth Spartans in Portsmouth, Ohio, a city with a population of approximately 40,000.[1] Under head coach Potsy Clark, the Lions won their first ten games (the first seven shut outs) before losing three straight games to end the season. They finished in second place in the NFL Western Division behind the undefeated Chicago Bears.

Three Lions ranked among the NFL leaders in rushing yardage: Dutch Clark with 763 yards (third), Ernie Caddel with 528 yards (fifth), and Ace Gutowsky with 517 yards (seventh). Two Lions also ranked among the league leaders in points scored: Dutch Clark with 73 points (second) and Glenn Presnell with 63 points (third). Clark also led the NFL with 1,146 yards of total offense and ranked among the league leaders with 13 extra points made (second) and 383 passing yards (fourth). Harry Ebding led the NFL with 264 receiving yards and 22.0 receiving yards per game.[2]

ScheduleEdit

Week Date Opponent Result
1 September 23, 1934 New York Giants W 9–0
2 September 30, 1934 Chicago Cardinals W 6–0
3 October 7, 1934 at Green Bay Packers W 3–0
4 October 14, 1934 at Philadelphia Eagles W 10–0
5 October 17, 1934 Boston Redskins W 24–0
6 October 21, 1934 Brooklyn Dodgers W 28–0
7 October 28, 1934 at Cincinnati Reds W 38–0
8 November 4, 1934 Pittsburgh Pirates W 40–7
9 November 11, 1934 at Chicago Cardinals W 17–13
10 November 18, 1934 St. Louis Gunners W 40–7
11 November 25, 1934 Green Bay Packers L 3–0
12 November 29, 1934 Chicago Bears L 19–16
13 December 2, 1934 at Chicago Bears L 10–7

StandingsEdit

NFL Western Division
view · talk · edit W L T PCT DIV PF PA STK
Chicago Bears 13 0 0 1.000 8–0 286 86 W13
Detroit Lions 10 3 0 .769 5–3 238 59 L3
Green Bay Packers 7 6 0 .538 4–5 156 112 W1
Chicago Cardinals 5 6 0 .455 4–5 80 84 W1
St. Louis Gunners 1 2 0 .333 0–2 27 61 L2
Cincinnati Reds 0 8 0 .000 0–6 10 243 L8

Note: Tie games were not officially counted in the standings until 1972.

Game summariesEdit

Game 1: New York GiantsEdit

Game 1: New York at Detroit
by Quarter1234 Total
New York Giants 0 0 0 0 0
Detroit 0 0 3 6 9
  • Date: Sept. 23
  • Location: Detroit
  • Game attendance: 12,000
  • Referee: Bob Karns

On September 23, 1934, the Lions opened their first season in Detroit with a 9–0 victory over the New York Giants before a crowd of 12,000 persons at the University of Detroit Stadium. Dutch Clark drop-kicked a field goal from the 20-yard line in the third quarter, and Father Lumpkin intercepted an Ed Danowski pass and returned it 45 yards for the Lions' first touchdown.[3] On offense, the Lions gained 187 yards of total offense, 185 rushing yards and only two passing yards (one completion on three passes). On defense, the Lions held Harry Newman's Giants to 153 yards, 109 rushing and 36 passing (two completions and two interceptions on 18 passes).[4] The Lions fumbled five times in the game and gave up 45 yards on penalties.[4]

The Lions' starting lineup in their first game in Detroit was as follows: Harry Ebding (right end), George Christensen (right tackle), Ox Emerson (right guard), Chuck Bernard (center), Maury Bodenger (left guard), Jack Johnson (left tackle), Bill McKalip (left end), Dutch Clark (quarterback), Ernie Caddell (right halfback), Father Lumpkin (left halfback), and Ace Gutowsky (fullback). Detroit substitutes who appeared in the game were backs Frank Christensen, Glenn Presnell, and Bob Rowe, ends Buster Mitchell and John Schneller, and tackles Sam Knox and Bob Emerick.[4]

Game 2: Chicago CardinalsEdit

Game 2: Chicago at Detroit
by Quarter1234 Total
Chicago Cardinals 0 0 0 0 0
Detroit 6 0 0 0 6
  • Date: Sept. 30
  • Location: Detroit
  • Game attendance: 7,000

On September 30, 1934, the Lions defeated the Chicago Cardinals, 6–0, before a crowd of 7,000 at University of Detroit Stadium. Dutch Clark scored on a two-yard touchdown run five minutes into the game; Clark then missed on his drop-kick for the extra point. Father Lumpkin had a key interception to stop a Chicago drive at midfield. The Lions were held to 119 rushing yards in the game. A group of Detroit Tigers, including Mickey Cochrane, Schoolboy Rowe, Chief Hogsett, and Elden Auker, watched the game from a midfield box before the start of the 1934 World Series three days later.[5]

The Lions' starting lineup against the Cardinals was Harry Ebding (right end), George Christensen (right tackle), Ox Emerson (right guard), Chuck Bernard (center), Maury Bodenger (left guard), Jack Johnson (left tackle), Bill McKalip (left end), Dutch Clark (quarterback), Ernie Caddell (right halfback), Father Lumpkin (left halfback), and Frank Christensen (fullback). Detroit substitutes who appeared in the game were backs Ace Gutowsky, Glenn Presnell, Bob Rowe, and Bill McWilliams; ends Buster Mitchell and John Schneller; guards Thomas Hupke and Russ Lay; and center Clare Randolph.[5]

Game 3: at Green Bay PackersEdit

Game 3: Detroit at Green Bay
by Quarter1234 Total
Detroit 0 3 0 0 3
Green Bay 0 0 0 0 0
  • Date: Oct. 7
  • Location: Green Bay
  • Game attendance: 8,000
  • Referee: Bobby Cahn

On October 7, 1934, the Lions defeated the Green Bay Packers, 3–0, before a crowd of 8,000 at City Stadium in Green Bay, Wisconsin. The only points of the game were scored on a 54-yard field goal kicked from placement by backup quarterback Glenn Presnell.[6] The Green Bay Press-Gazette reported that Presnell's kick was "probably the longest kick for a score in the record" of NFL competition.[7] On offense, the Lions gained 172 total yards, 101 rushing (led by Ace Gutowsky with 54 yards), and 71 passing (five completions out of 22 passes, including a 30-yard gain on a pass from Dutch Clark to Ernie Caddel). On defense, the Lions held the Packers to 123 total yards, 115 rushing and eight passing (two completions and one interceptions on eight passes).[7]

The Lions' starting lineup against the Packers was John Schneller (right end), George Christensen (right tackle), Ox Emerson (right guard), Clare Randolph (center), Maury Bodenger (left guard), Jack Johnson (left tackle), Buster Mitchell (left end), Dutch Clark (quarterback), Ernie Caddell (right halfback), Father Lumpkin (left halfback), and Frank Christensen (fullback). Detroit substitutes who appeared in the game were Bill McKalip (left end), Chuck Bernard (center), Russ Lay (right guard), Ace Gutowsky (left halfback), Glenn Presnell (quarterback), Harry Ebding (end), Ray Richards, Thomas Hupke, and Bob Emerick.[6][7]

Game 4: at Philadelphia EaglesEdit

Game 4: Detroit at Philadelphia
by Quarter1234 Total
Detroit 0 7 0 3 10
Philadelphia 0 0 0 0 0

On October 7, 1934, the Lions defeated the Philadelphia Eagles, 10–0, before a crowd of 10,000 at the Baker Bowl in Philadelphia. Ernie Caddel ran nine yards for the game's only touchdown in the second quarter, and Dutch Clark drop-kicked the extra point. Caddel also had the longest run of the game at 53 yards. Clark added a field goal from the 25-yard line in the fourth quarter. On offense, the Lions rushed for 145 yards and tallied 36 passing yards (four completions out of 18 passes). On defense, the Lions held the Eagles to 131 rushing yards (80 by Swede Hanson) and five completions on 26 passes for 20 yards.[8][9]

The Lions' starting lineup against the Eagles was John Schneller (right end), George Christensen (right tackle), Ox Emerson (right guard), Clare Randolph (center), Maury Bodenger (left guard), Jack Johnson (left tackle), Buster Mitchell (left end), Glenn Presnell (quarterback), Ernie Caddell (right halfback), Frank Christensen (left halfback), and Ace Gutowsky (fullback). Detroit substitutes who appeared in the game were McKalip (left end), Emerick (left tackle), Hupke (left guard), Chuck Bernard (center), Richards (right guard), Knox (right tackle), Ebding (right end), Dutch Clark (quarterback), Father Lumpkin (left halfback), Bill McWilliams (right halfback), and Bob Rowe (fullback).[8]

Game 5: Boston RedskinsEdit

Game 5: Boston at Detroit
by Quarter1234 Total
Boston Redskins 0 0 0 0 0
Detroit 0 3 14 7 24
  • Date: Oct. 17
  • Location: Detroit
  • Game attendance: 12,000
  • Referee: Bobbie Cahn

On October 17, 1934, in a Wednesday night game, the Lions defeated the Boston Redskins, 24–0, before a crowd of 12,000 at the University of Detroit Stadium. Dutch Clark began the scoring late in the second quarter with a field goal from the 33-yard line.

At the start of the second half, Father Lumpkin returned the kickoff to Boston's 20-yard line. Frank Christensen scored a touchdown nine plays later on a short run. On the next Detroit drive, the Lions gained 30 yards to Boston's 25-yard line on a pass from Clark to Harry Ebding. After an injury to Father Lumpkin, Ace Gutowsky entered the game and scored a touchdown on a six-yard run.

In the fourth quarter, Ernie Caddel ran around the right end for a 52-yard gain to Boston's five-yard line. Glenn Presnell ran around the left end for the final touchdown. Clark added two extra points on drop-kicks, and Presnell placekicked another. On defense, the Detroit Free Press described the Lions play as "almost flawless".[10] They held a Boston team featuring Cliff Battles to 112 total yards, as the Redskins attempted 16 passes, completed only three and had four passes intercepted.[10]

The Lions' starting lineup against the Redskins was Harry Ebding (right end), George Christensen (right tackle), Ox Emerson (right guard), Clare Randolph (center), Maury Bodenger (left guard), Jack Johnson (left tackle), Bill McKalip (left end), Dutch Clark (quarterback), Ernie Caddell (right halfback), Father Lumpkin (left halfback), and Frank Christensen (fullback). Detroit substitutes who appeared in the game were John Schneller (right end), Glenn Presnell (right halfback), Buster Mitchell (left end), Chuck Bernard (center), Maury Bodenger (left guard), Ace Gutowsky (left halfback), Sam Knox (right tackle), Thomas Hupke (right guard), Bob Emerick (right tackle), Ray Richards (right guard), Bob Rowe (right halfback), and Bill McWilliams (left halfback).[10]

Game 6: Brooklyn DodgersEdit

Game 6: Brooklyn at Detroit
by Quarter1234 Total
Brooklyn Dodgers 0 0 0 0 0
Detroit 0 0 21 7 28
  • Date: Oct. 22
  • Location: Detroit
  • Game attendance: 11,000
  • Referee: Robert Karch

On October 22, in a Monday night game, the Lions defeated the Brooklyn Dodgers, 28–0, before a crowd of 11,000 at University of Detroit Stadium. After a scoreless first half, Dutch Clark scored three touchdowns in the third quarter and dropkicked three extra points. Clark's second touchdown came on a 72-yard run. His third touchdown came on a short run which was set up when Frank Christensen intercepted a pass and returned it to Brooklyn's three-yard line. In the fourth quarter, Glenn Presnell substituted for Clark at quarterback and scored a touchdown on a seven-yard run.[11]

The Lions rushed for 257 yards in the game, and the Detroit Free Press credited Father Lumpkin: "Pop Lumpkin, Lion blocking back, clearly demonstrated Monday night that he is as good a blocking back as there is in the business. Pop boxed tackles, blocked ends, blocked for punt handlers and always was in front of the play in the secondary. Pop was in front of Clark clearing the way on every one of Dutch's brilliant runs."[11]

On defense, the Lions held the Dodgers (featuring Shipwreck Kelly) to 56 rushing yards, and the Dodgers' leading passer Chris Cagle was unable to complete a single pass. As a team, the Dodgers completed one of 10 passes for five yards and had four passes intercepted by the Lions. A fight in the fourth quarter between Buster Mitchell and Ollie Sansen resulted in the ejection of both players. [11]

The Lions' starting lineup against the Dodgers was John Schneller (right end), George Christensen (right tackle), Ox Emerson (right guard), Clare Randolph (center), Thomas Hupke (left guard), Jack Johnson (left tackle), Buster Mitchell (left end), Dutch Clark (quarterback), Ernie Caddell (right halfback), Father Lumpkin (left halfback), and Frank Christensen (fullback). Detroit substitutes who appeared in the game were Harry Ebding (right end), Bill McKalip (left end), Maury Bodenger (left guard), Chuck Bernard (center), Glenn Presnell (right halfback), Ace Gutowsky (fullback), Sam Knox (right tackle), Bob Emerick (left tackle), Bob Rowe (left halfback), and Bill McWilliams (right halfback).[11]

Game 7: at Cincinnati RedsEdit

Game 7: Detroit at Cincinnait
by Quarter1234 Total
Detroit 3 10 19 6 38
Cincinnati 0 0 0 0 0

On October 28, 1934, the Lions defeated the Cincinnati Reds, 38–0, before a crowd of 5,000 in Cincinnati. The game was described as a "home coming" for the Lions who had played in southern Ohio as the Portsmouth Spartans one year earlier. Led by Father Lumpkin's blocking, the Lions rushed for 373 yards. The Lions outgained the Reds by 485 yards (373 rushing and 112 passing) to 81 (60 rushing and 21 passing). Dutch Clark scored two touchdowns and kicked a field goal. Glenn Presnell scored a touchdown and kicked a field goal, and additional touchdowns were scored by Lumpkin and Ace Gutowsky. The Lions intercepted four Cincinnati passes, but were penalized six times for 60 yards.[12]

The Lions' victory over the Reds extended the team's streak of shutout victories to seven games, tying an NFL record set by the 1921 Akron Pros. The record has not been matched since 1934.[13]

The Lions' starting lineup against the Reds was Harry Ebding (right end), George Christensen (right tackle), Ox Emerson (right guard), Clare Randolph (center), Maury Bodenger (left guard), Jack Johnson (left tackle), Bill McKalip (left end), Dutch Clark (quarterback), Ernie Caddell (right halfback), Father Lumpkin (left halfback), and Ace Gutowsky (fullback). Detroit substitutions included ends Buster Mitchell and John Schneller, guards/tackles Sam Knox, Ray Richards and Bob Emerick, and backs Frank Christensen, Glenn Presnell, and Bill McWilliams.[12]

Game 8: Pittsburgh PiratesEdit

On November 4, 1934, the Lions defeated the Pittsburgh Pirates, 40–7.[14] The Lions rushed for 426 yards against the Pirates, a total that remains a single-game NFL record.

Game 9: at Chicago CardinalsEdit

On November 11, 1934, the Lions defeated the Chicago Cardinals, 17–13.[15]

Game 10: St. Louis GunnersEdit

On November 18, 1934, the Lions defeated the St. Louis Gunners, 40–7.[16]

Game 11: Green Bay PackersEdit

Game 11: Green Bay at Detroit
by Quarter1234 Total
Green Bay 0 0 0 3 3
Detroit 0 0 0 0 0

On November 25, 1934, the Lions lost to the Green Bay Packers, 3–0, in front of a crowd of 12,000 spectators in Detroit. Neither team scored in the first three quarters. Clarke Hinkle kicked a 38-yard field goal in the fourth quarter.[17]

The Lions' starting lineup against the Packers was Harry Ebding (right end), George Christensen (right tackle), Ox Emerson (right guard), Clare Randolph (center), Maury Bodenger (left guard), Jack Johnson (left tackle), Bill McKalip (left end), Glenn Presnell (quarterback), Ernie Caddell (right halfback), Father Lumpkin (left halfback), and Frank Christensen (fullback).[17]

Game 12: Chicago BearsEdit

Game 13: Chicago at Detroit
by Quarter1234 Total
Chicago Bears 0 7 6 6 19
Detroit 7 9 0 0 16
  • Date: Nov. 29
  • Location: Detroit
  • Game attendance: 26,000
  • Referee: Cahn

On Thanksgiving Day, November 29, 1934, the Lions lost to the Chicago Bears, 19–16, before a record crowd of 26,000 at University of Detroit Stadium. With the victory, the Bears secured the NFL Western Division championship over the second-place Lions.[18]

Detroit took a 16 to 7 lead at halftime, as Ace Gutowsky scored two touchdowns, Dutch Clark kicked an extra point, and Glenn Presnell kicked a 34-yard field goal. The Bears scored on two field goals by Jack Manders in the third quarter. The winning score followed Joe Zeller's fourth-quarter interception of a Glenn Presnell pass that was returned to Detroit's four-yard line. Bronko Nagurski threw a game-winning touchdown pass to Bill Hewitt. The Lions rushed for 201 yards in the game and held the Bears to 116 rushing yards.[18]

The Lions' starting lineup against the Bears was John Schneller (right end), George Christensen (right tackle), Ox Emerson (right guard), Chuck Bernard (center), Sam Knox (left guard), Jack Johnson (left tackle), Buster Mitchell (left end), Dutch Clark (quarterback), Ernie Caddell (right halfback), Father Lumpkin (left halfback), and Ace Gutowsky (fullback). Detroit substitutions included Curly Hinchman, Bob Rowe, Glenn Presnell, Harry Ebding, Bill McKalip, Clare Randolph, Maury Bodenger, Bob Emerick, and Ray Richards.[18]

Game 13: at Chicago BearsEdit

Game 13: Detroit at Chicago
by Quarter1234 Total
Detroit 0 0 0 7 7
Chicago Bears 7 3 0 0 10

On Sunday, December 2, 1934, the Lions lost again to the Bears, this time by a 10–7 score at Wrigley Field in Chicago. In the first quarter, Chicago's George Musso blocked a Dutch Clark punt, and the Bears took over at Detroit's 27-yard line. Bronko Nagurski scored a touchdown, and Jack Manders kicked the extra point. Manders added a field goal in the second quarter. In the fourth quarter, Glenn Presnell ran 33 yards for a touchdown and kicked the extra point.[19]

The Lions' starting lineup against the Bears was Harry Ebding (right end), Bob Emerick (right tackle), Sam Knox (right guard), Chuck Bernard (center), Ox Emerson (left guard), George Christensen (left tackle), Bill McKalip (left end), Dutch Clark (quarterback), Ernie Caddell (right halfback), Curly Hinchman (left halfback), and Ace Gutowsky (fullback).[18]

RosterEdit

Awards and recordsEdit

Eight Lions received All-Pro honors in 1934 as follows:[20]

ReferencesEdit

  1. "Detroit Lions Official Website: Detroit Lions History and Records". http://www.detroitlions.com/section_display.cfm?level=3&section_id=8&top=1.
  2. "1934 NFL Leaders and Leaderboards". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. https://www.pro-football-reference.com/years/1934/leaders.htm. Retrieved October 30, 2017.
  3. Tod Rockwell (September 24, 1934). "Lumpkin Sprints 45 Yards for Lone Touchdown of Game". Detroit Free Press: p. 13. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/14756914/lumpkin_sprints_45_yards_for_lone/.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Tod Rockwell (September 24, 1934). "Lumpkin Sprints 45 Yards for Lone Touchdown of Game (part 2)". Detroit Free Press: p. 16. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/14794992/lions_outplay_giants_to_win_dutch/.
  5. 5.0 5.1 "Lions Get Away to an Early Lead and Conquer Chicago Cardinals, 6 to 0". Detroit Free Press: p. 15. October 1, 1934. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/14795222/lions_get_away_to_an_early_lead_and/.
  6. 6.0 6.1 "Presnell's 54-Yard Placekick Enables the Lions to Whip Green Bay, 3 to 0". Detroit Free Press: p. 14. October 8, 1934. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/14795328/presnells_54yard_placekick_enables/.
  7. 7.0 7.1 7.2 "Detroit Wins From Green Bay, 3 to 0". Green Bay Press-Gazette: p. 11. October 8, 1934. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/14795412/detroit_wins_from_green_bay_3_to_0/.
  8. 8.0 8.1 "Lions Beat Philadelphia, 10–0, and Keep Goal Uncrossed". Detroit Free Press: p. 13. October 15, 1934. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/14795582/lions_beat_philadelphia_100_and/.
  9. Stan Baumgartner (October 15, 1934). "Detroit Drubs Eagles, 10 to 0: Caddel Scores For Lions as 10,000 Watch". The Philadelphia Inquirer: p. 13. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/14795624/detroit_drubs_eagles_10_to_0/.
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 Tod Rockwell (October 18, 1934). "Lions Maintain Perfect Record by Beating Boston, 24 to 0". Detroit Free Press: p. 15. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/14797597/lions_maintain_perfect_record_by/.
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 "Lions Keep Record Clean by Defeating Dodgers, 28 to 0". Detroit Free Press: p. 15. October 23, 1934. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/14798288/lions_keep_record_clean_by_defeating/.
  12. 12.0 12.1 Tod Rockwell (October 29, 1934). "Lions Keep Record Unmarred by Trouncing Cincinnati, 38-0". Detroit Free Press: pp. 13, 15. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/14799672/lions_keep_record_unmarred_by_trouncing/.
  13. "Team Records: Games Won". National Football League. http://www.nfl.com/history/randf/records/team/gameswon. Retrieved October 31, 2017.
  14. "Lions Crush Pirates But Goal Line Finally is Crossed". Detroit Free Press: pp. 13, 15. November 5, 1934. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/14808827/lions_crush_pirates_but_goal_line/.
  15. "Lions Stand Off Cards' Rally to Win Ninth Game, 17-13". Detroit Free Press: pp. 13, 15. November 12, 1934. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/14809022/lions_stand_off_cards_rally_to_win/.
  16. "Lions Rout Gunners, 40–7, to Equal Record of 10 Victories". Detroit Free Press: pp. 13, 14. November 19, 1934. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/14809109/lions_rout_gunners_407_to_equal/.
  17. 17.0 17.1 Tod Rockwell (November 26, 1934). "Green Bay Hands Lions First Defeat in 11 Games, 3 to 0". Detroit Free Press: pp. 13, 15. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/14809174/green_bay_hands_lions_first_defeat_in/.
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 18.3 "Nagurski's Trick Pass to Hewitt Gives Title to Bears". Detroit Free Press: pp. 15, 19. November 30, 1934. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/14809248/nagurskis_trick_pass_to_hewitt_gives/.
  19. "Bears Take Early Lead and Lions Lose Season's Final, 10 to 7". Detroit Free Press: p. 13. December 3, 1934. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/14809309/bears_take_early_lead_and_lions_lose/.
  20. "1934 NFL All-Pros". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. https://www.pro-football-reference.com/years/1934/allpro.htm. Retrieved October 30, 2017.
Eastern Division Western Division
Boston Chicago Bears
Brooklyn Chicago Cardinals
New York Cincinnati
Philadelphia Detroit
Pittsburgh Green Bay
St. Louis
NFL Championship

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.