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1928 Georgia Tech Golden Tornado football
National champion (Boand, Helms, Houlgate, et al.)
Co-national champion (Davis)
SoCon champion
Rose Bowl, W 8–7 vs. California
ConferenceSouthern Conference
1928 record10–0 (7–0 SoCon)
Head coachWilliam Alexander (9th season)
Assistant coachDon Miller
Assistant coachBill Fincher
Offensive schemeJump shift
CaptainPeter Pund
Home stadiumGrant Field
Seasons
← 1927
1929 →
1928 Southern Conference football standings
v · d · e Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Georgia Tech 7 0 0     10 0 0
Tennessee 6 0 1     9 0 1
Florida 6 1 0     8 1 0
Virginia Tech 4 1 0     7 2 0
Alabama 6 2 0     6 3 0
LSU 3 1 1     6 2 1
Clemson 4 2 0     8 3 0
Vanderbilt 4 2 0     8 2 0
Tulane 3 3 1     6 3 1
Ole Miss 3 3 0     5 4 0
North Carolina 2 2 2     5 3 2
Kentucky 2 2 1     4 3 1
South Carolina 2 2 1     6 2 2
Maryland 2 3 1     6 3 1
VMI 2 3 1     5 3 2
Georgia 2 4 0     4 5 0
NC State 1 3 1     4 5 1
Mississippi State 1 4 0     2 4 2
Virginia 1 6 0     2 6 1
Washington & Lee 1 6 0     2 8 0
Sewanee 0 5 0     2 7 0
Auburn 0 7 0     1 8 0
† – Conference champion

The 1928 Georgia Tech Golden Tornado football team[note 1] represented the Georgia Institute of Technology (commonly known as Georgia Tech) during the 1928 Southern Conference football season. The team, which was a member of the Southern Conference (SoCon), was coached by William Alexander in his ninth year as head coach. Alexander compiled a record of 10–0 (7–0 SoCon) and outscored his opponents 213 to 40. Georgia Tech played its home games at Grant Field.

The team was selected national champion by Berryman, Billingsley, Boand, Football Research, Helms, Houlgate, NCF, Poling, and Sagarin (ELO-Chess), while Parke Davis named them co-champion as shared with Detroit.[3] Additionally, USC also earned recognition under the Dickinson System. USC declined the 1929 Rose Bowl invitation, resulting in a matchup of California and Georgia Tech. The game was decided by a safety, which was scored after Cal's Roy "Wrong Way" Riegels ran 65 yards (59 m) in the wrong direction.

Several Georgia Tech players received postseason honors. Captain and center Peter Pund was a consensus All-American. Coach Knute Rockne said of Tech's 13–0 defeat of Notre Dame, "I sat at Grant Field and saw a magnificent Notre Dame team suddenly recoil before the furious pounding of one man–Peter Pund". Tackle Frank Speer was also selected as a first-team All-American by the Associated Press.

Before the seasonEdit

After the defeat of the Georgia Bulldogs' 1927 Dream and Wonder team,[4][5] Georgia Tech returned all but one of its key players.[6][7][note 2] Alabama coach Wallace Wade said Georgia Tech, Georgia, and Vanderbilt had the best chances of winning a southern title.[9][10] Georgia Tech head coach William Alexander held daily scrimmages.[11]

The Golden Tornado was led by center and senior captain Peter Pund, who was never penalized,[12] and was a key player on defense.[13] Halfback Warner Mizell headed a powerful backfield that also included Stumpy Thomason and Father Lumpkin.[5][13]

ScheduleEdit

DateTimeOpponentSiteResultAttendance
October 6VMIW 13–018,000
October 13at Tulane
W 12–0
October 20Notre Dame*
  • Grant Field
  • Atlanta, GA
W 13–035,000
October 273:00 p. m.at North CarolinaW 20–720,000
November 3Oglethorpe*
  • Grant Field
  • Atlanta, GA
W 32–78,000
November 10Vanderbilt
  • Grant Field
  • Atlanta, GA
W 19–730,000
November 17Alabama
  • Grant Field
  • Atlanta, GA
W 33–1326,000
November 29Auburn
  • Grant Field
  • Atlanta, GA
W 51–020,000
December 82:00 p. m.Georgia
W 20–640,000
January 1, 1929vs. California*W 8–766,604
  • *Non-conference game

[14]

Season summaryEdit

V. M. I.Edit

V. M. I. at Georgia Tech
by Quarter1234 Total
V. M. I. 0 0 0 0 0
Ga. Tech 0 6 7 6 19

Georgia Tech opened the season on October 6 with a 13–0 defeat of the VMI Keydets, in a game marred by fumbles in every quarter.[15] Tech gained 307 yards and VMI 159.[16] The Georgia Tech line "tore the V. M. I. line to shreds" and all members of the backfield played well.[15] W. R. Tichenor was umpire.[15] Georgia Tech's starting lineup was Holland (left end), Thrash (left tackle), Westbrook (left guard), Pund (center), Drennon (right guard), Speer (right tackle), Waddey (right end), Durant (quarterback), Mizell (left halfback), Thomason (right halfback), and Randolph (fullback).[15]

TulaneEdit

Georgia Tech at Tulane
by Quarter1234 Total
Ga. Tech 0 6 0 6 12
Tulane 0 0 0 0 0

In the second week of play, Georgia Tech scored twice on forward passes to beat the Tulane Green Wave 12–0. The first one came in the second quarter; Warner Mizell threw a 25-yard (23 m) pass to Tom Jones. The second came in the fourth quarter on a pass from Dunlap to Stumpy Thomason.[17] Georgia Tech started the second half of the game with a fierce drive down to the 1-yard (0.91 m) line when Randolph fumbled the ball away.[17]

Notre DameEdit

Notre Dame at Georgia Tech
by Quarter1234 Total
Notre Dame 0 0 0 0 0
Ga. Tech 7 0 0 6 13
  • Date: October 20
  • Location: Grant Field
    Atlanta, GA
  • Game attendance: 35,000

Georgia Tech next defeated coach Knute Rockne's Notre Dame Fighting Irish 13–0.[18] Father Lumpkin intercepted two Irish passes, setting up the winning score by running the second interception down to the 3-yard (2.7 m) line.[19] After the game, coach Rockne said, "I sat at Grant Field and saw a magnificent Notre Dame team suddenly recoil before the furious pounding of one man–Peter Pund ... Nobody could stop him. I counted 20 scoring plays that this man ruined".[20][21] Rockne later also wrote of an attack on his coaching in the Atlanta Journal, "I am surprised that a paper of such fine, high standing [as yours] would allow a zipper to write in his particular vein ... the article by Fuzzy Woodruff was not called for".[22]

Tech's backfield coach Don Miller was a former player of Rockne's, one of the "Four Horsemen". As coach Alexander explained, "Coach Miller knows the Notre Dame offense of Knute Rockne as well as any man alive. It's virtually the same offense that Kid Woodruff has at Georgia."[23]

Georgia Tech's starting lineup was Holland (left end), Maree (left tackle), Westbrook (left guard), Pund (center), Drennon (right guard), Speer (right tackle), Waddey (right end), Durant (quarterback), Mizell (left halfback), Thomason (right halfback), and Randolph (fullback).[18]

North CarolinaEdit

Georgia Tech at North Carolina
by Quarter1234 Total
Ga. Tech 6 14 0 0 20
UNC 0 0 0 7 7

The Golden Tornado then invaded North Carolina for the first time and beat the Tar Heels 20–7.[25] Georgia Tech started the game with its second stringers, which seemed to perform sufficiently.[24]

Four minutes into the game, Earl Dunlap hit Tom Jones with a 55-yard (50 m) touchdown pass.[24] The next score came when Fitzgerald cut back on a 37-yard (34 m) touchdown run. The third was a short run Dunlap set up by a pass to Holland.[26] In the second half, Tech made two first downs to ten for North Carolina.[26] Georgia Tech's starting lineup was Jones (left end), Watkins (left tackle), Westbrook (left guard), Pund (center), Drennon (right guard), Speer (right tackle), Waddey (right end), Durant (quarterback), Mizell (left halfback), Thomason (right halfback), and Randolph (fullback).[27]

OglethorpeEdit

Oglethorpe at Georgia Tech
by Quarter1234 Total
Oglethorpe 0 7 0 0 7
Ga. Tech 0 7 6 10 23
  • Date: November 3
  • Location: Grant Field
    Atlanta, GA
  • Game attendance: 8,000
  • Game weather: Rain
  • Referee: Buck Cheves

Georgia Tech defeated the local Oglethorpe Stormy Petrels 32–7. Light rain kept the attendance at 8,000.[29] After a 7–7 tie in the first half, the Petrels were smothered "under an avalanche of off tackle plays" in the second;[28][30] their touchdown drive having used up all of their energy.[29] Cy Bell was Oglethorpe's star.[28]

Stumpy Thomason had multiple long gains.[28] Tech gained 320 yards (290 m) to Oglethorpe's 62 yards (57 m).[29] W. R. Tichenor was umpire. Georgia Tech's starting lineup was Jones (left end), Thrash (left tackle), Edwards (left guard), Pund (center), Brooke (right guard), Speer (right tackle), Waddey (right end), Durant (quarterback), Wilson (left halfback), Thomason (right halfback), and Randolph (fullback).[28]

VanderbiltEdit

Vanderbilt at Georgia Tech
by Quarter1234 Total
Vanderbilt 0 0 0 7 7
Ga. Tech 0 7 6 6 19
  • Date: November 10
  • Location: Grant Field
    Atlanta, GA
  • Game attendance: 30,000
  • Referee: Gardner (Illinois)

Georgia Tech ended the Jimmy Armistead-led Vanderbilt Commodores' hopes of a southern title with a 19–7 victory.[32] The ground-gaining of Thomason, Lumpkin, and Mizell carried Georgia Tech.[32]

Georgia Tech's first touchdown came on a 45-yard (41 m) pass from Tom Jones to Warner Mizell on a triple pass play.[31] Georgia Tech's next score came on an end run from Mizell. Vanderbilt's lone score came on an 85-yard (78 m) run by lineman Bull Brown after picking up a Stumpy Thomason fumble.[33] The last score was a short run by Lumpkin.[31] W. R. Tichenor was field judge. Georgia Tech's starting lineup was Jones (left end), Maree (left tackle), Westbrook (left guard), Pund (center), Drennon (right guard), Speer (right tackle), Waddey (right end), Schulman (quarterback), Mizell (left halfback), Lumpkin (right halfback), and Randolph (fullback).[31]

AlabamaEdit

Alabama at Georgia Tech
by Quarter1234 Total
Alabama 0 13 0 0 13
Ga. Tech 6 7 0 20 33
  • Date: November 17
  • Location: Grant Field
    Atlanta, GA
  • Game attendance: 26,000

Tech defeated coach Wallace Wade's Alabama Crimson Tide 33–13, scoring three times in the final period to break a 13–13 tie at the half.[34] Coach Alexander gave his team a fiery halftime speech, drawing up defensive plays.[23]

Warner Mizell scored first when he went back to punt, but fumbled the snap, and picked it up and ran it 75 yards (69 m).[34] In the fourth quarter, Alabama drove to Tech's 32-yard (29 m) line when Tony Holm, who had been playing his greatest game, suffered a fractured rib.[34] Georgia Tech took over and the deadlock was eventually broken when Stumpy Thomason ran 46 yards (42 m). Later, Mizell passed to Thomason for another touchdown. The final score came on an interception from Bob Durant returned 55 yards (50 m).[34]

Georgia Tech's starting lineup was Jones (left end), Maree (left tackle), Westbrook (left guard), Pund (center), Drennon (right guard), Speer (right tackle), Waddey (right end), Durant (quarterback), Mizell (left halfback), Thomason (right halfback), and Randolph (fullback).[35]

AuburnEdit

Prior to the rivalry game with Auburn, Mizell was stricken with the flu.[36] Tech still won 51–0. Georgia Tech's starting lineup was Jones (left end), Maree (left tackle), Westbrook (left guard), Pund (center), Drennon (right guard), Watkins (right tackle), Waddey (right end), Schulman (quarterback), Fiasst (left halfback), Lumpkin (right halfback), and Randolph (fullback).[36]

GeorgiaEdit

Georgia at Georgia Tech
by Quarter1234 Total
Georgia 6 0 0 0 6
Ga. Tech 0 7 13 0 20
  • Date: December 8
  • Location: Grant Field
    Atlanta, GA
  • Game start: 2:00 p. m.
  • Game attendance: 40,000
  • Referee: Gardner (Cornell)

In the final game of the regular season, Georgia Tech defeated the rival Georgia Bulldogs 20–6.[37] In the third period, Stumpy Thomason twisted for a 42-yard (38 m) run after an exchange of punts. Lumpkin ran through the line for 15 yards (14 m) and the ensuing touchdown to lead 14–6.[37]

The same week, the Tennessee Volunteers upset the high-scoring Florida Gators to give Georgia Tech the only claim to the southern championship.[37] Georgia Tech's starting lineup was Jones (left end), Watkins (left tackle), Westbrook (left guard), Pund (center), Drennon (right guard), Thrash (right tackle), Waddey (right end), Durant (quarterback), Mizell (left halfback), Thomason (right halfback), and Lumpkin (fullback).[37]

Post-seasonEdit

CaliforniaEdit

Rose Bowl
by Quarter1234 Total
Ga. Tech 0 2 6 0 8
Cal 0 0 0 7 7

Under the Dickinson System, USC was recognized as #1 but the 1929 Rose Bowl was contested between the #2 and #3 teams, California and Georgia Tech. The game was decided by a safety scored after California center Roy "Wrong Way" Riegels ran 65 yards (59 m) in the wrong direction, having picked up a fumble by Stumpy Thomason.[38]

File:Wrongwayriegels.jpg

30 yards (27 m)* from Tech's end zone, Riegels was turned around and ran many yards in the wrong direction.[4] Riegels told the Associated Press, "I was running toward the sidelines when I picked up the ball ... I started to turn to my left toward Tech's goal. Somebody shoved me and I bounded right off into a tackler. In pivoting to get away from him, I completely lost my bearings."[39] Teammate and quarterback Benny Lom chased Riegels, screaming at him to stop. Known for his speed, Lom finally caught up with Riegels at California's 3-yard (2.7 m) line and tried to turn him around, but he was immediately rushed by a wave of Georgia Tech players, and tackled by Frank Waddey and Vance Maree at the 1-yard (0.91 m) line.[40] The Bears chose to punt rather than risk a play so close to their own end zone, but Maree blocked Lom's punt for a safety, giving Tech a 2–0 lead.[41][42]

30px External video
16px Riegels' wrong way run, YouTube video.

During Roy's wrong-way run, coach Alexander told his excited players, who were jumping near the team's bench; "Sit down. Sit down. He's just running the wrong way. Every step he takes is to our advantage".[43] Broadcaster Graham McNamee, who was commentating the game on radio, said during Riegels' run; "What am I seeing? What's wrong with me? Am I crazy? Am I crazy? Am I crazy?"[44]

After the play, Riegels was so distraught he had to be persuaded to return to the game for the second half by his head coach Nibs Price. Riegels said, "Coach, I can't do it. I've ruined you, I've ruined myself, I've ruined the University of California. I couldn't face that crowd to save my life." Coach Price responded by saying "Roy, get up and go back out there—the game is only half over".[45] Riegels did play on; he turned in a strong second-half performance, including blocking a Georgia Tech punt.[46] Lom passed for a touchdown and kicked the extra point, but that was not enough.[47] Georgia Tech won the game and its second national championship 8–7. Its starting lineup was Waddey (left end), Speer (left tackle), Drennon (left guard), Pund (center), Westbrook (right guard), Maree (right tackle), Jones (right end), Durant (quarterback), Thomason (left halfback), Mizell (right halfback), and Lumpkin (fullback).[48]

Awards and honorsEdit

IndividualEdit

Several Georgia Tech players received post-season honors. Tackle Frank Speer was selected as a first-team All-American by the Associated Press.[49] Center Peter Pund was recognized as a consensus All-American.[50] Halfback Warner Mizell was a second-team All-American and first-team All-Southern. Ends Tom Jones and Frank Waddey, tackle Vance Maree, and guard Raleigh Drennon were also placed on All-Southern teams.[51] Coach Alexander called Drennon "the best all around guard that ever put a cleat into Grant Field."[13]

National championsEdit

Both USC and Georgia Tech claimed national championships for 1928.[52] Georgia Tech was retroactively selected as the national champion by the Berryman QPRS system, Billingsley Report, Boand System, College Football Researchers Association, Helms Athletic Foundation, Houlgate System, National Championship Foundation, Poling System, and Jeff Sagarin's ELO-Chess methodology system, and as a co-national champion by Parke H. Davis.[53] In honor of the Rose Bowl victory, Stumpy Thomason was given a bear cub by a local businessman. He grew attached to it, would drive it around town, and feed it Coca-Cola.[54]

PersonnelEdit

Depth chartEdit

The following chart depicts Tech's lineup during the 1928 season with games started at the position shown in parenthesis.[27] The chart mimics the offense after the jump shift has taken place.

LE
Tom Jones (7)
Glenn Holland (2)
Frank Waddey (1)
Slick Keener (0)
LT LG C RG RT
Vance Maree (4)Joe Westbrook (7) Peter Pund (9) Raleigh Drennon (7) Frank Speer (6)
Ken Thrash (2)Raleigh Drennon (1) Fatty Cain (0)Jim Brooks (1)Vance Maree (1)
Coot Watkins (2)Hudson Edwards (1) Hobby Law (0)Joe Westbrook (1) Ken Thrash (1)
Frank Speer (1) Jack Holt (0) Geo. Muse (0)Joe Kent (0)Coot Watkins (1)
RE
Frank Waddey (8)
Tom Jones (1)
Ed Herron (0)
Phil Von Weller (0)
QB
Bob Durant (7)
Izzy Schulman (2)
RHB
Stumpy Thomason (6)
Father Lumpkin (2)
Warner Mizell (1)
Shorty Smith (0)
Fite Fitzgerald (0)
FB
Bob Randolph (7)
Father Lumpkin (2)
LHB
Warner Mizell (7)
Sleepy Faisst (1)
Stumpy Thomason (1)
Wilson (1)
Earl Dunlap (0)
Russ Russell (0)

LettermenEdit

LineEdit

Number Player Position Games
started
Hometown Prep school Height Weight Age
72 Jim BrookeGuard 1Columbus, Georgia 5'11"18018
10 Raleigh DrennonGuard8 Atlanta, Georgia 5'10"18721
42 Hudson EdwardsGuard 1Atlanta, Georgia 6'0"18118
4 Ed HerronEnd Chattanooga, Tennessee 5'10"17019
2 Glenn HollandEnd 2Atlanta, Georgia 5'11"17020
5Tom JonesEnd8 Clarkesville, Georgia 5'11"17519
61 Slick KeenerEnd Gadsden, Alabama 5'10"18121
38 Vance MareeTackle 4Savannah, Georgia 6'1"19119
15 Peter PundCenter 9Augusta, GeorgiaRichmond Academy 6'0"18221
78 Seedy RuskCenter Atlanta, Georgia 6'0"17921
48 Frank SpeerTackle 7Atlanta, Georgia 6'0"20420
80 Ken ThrashTackle3 Orlando, Florida 5'10"19022
22 Phil Von WellerEnd Albany, Georgia 6'0"17820
26 Coot WatkinsTackle3 Atlanta, Georgia 6'0"19920
70 Frank WaddeyEnd9 Memphis, Tennessee 5'10"18423
6 Joe WestbrookGuard 8Moultrie, Georgia 5'11"18023

Source:[27]

BackfieldEdit

Number Player Position Games
started
Hometown Prep school Height Weight Age
84 Earl DunlapHalfback Sumter, South Carolina 5'10"17718
22 Bob DurantQuarterback 7Bluefield, West Virginia 5'9"16120
7 Sleepy FaisstHalfback 1Little Rock, Arkansas 5'10"16020
18 Fite FitzgeraldHalfback Jackson, Tennessee 5'10"16420
59 Father LumpkinFullback4 Dallas, Texas Oak Cliff High 6'1"17619
67 Warner MizellHalfback8 Atlanta, Georgia Miami Senior High5'10"17020
63 Bob ParhamHalfback Atlanta, Georgia 6'1"17621
24 Bob RandolphFullback8 Atlanta, Georgia 5'10"17621
28 Izzy ShulmanQuarterback, halfback2 Jackson, Tennessee 5'8"15520
37 Shorty SmithHalfback Cartersville, Georgia 5'7"15321
71 Stumpy ThomasonHalfback7 Atlanta, Georgia 5'8"17420

Source:[27]

SubstitutesEdit

LineEdit

Number Player Position Hometown Prep school Height Weight Age
62 Fatty CainCenter Savannah, Georgia 5'9"18318
65 Jack HoltTackleLittle Rock, Arkansas 6'1"18820
Joe KentGuard Moultrie, Georgia 5'10"18121
1 Hobby LawCenterChattanooga, Tennessee 5'9"17319
81 Geo MuseCenter Covington, Kentucky 5'10"17819

Source:[27]

BackfieldEdit

Number Player Position Hometown Prep school Height Weight Age
53 Jimmie FrinkHalfback Miami, Florida 5'10"16219
Bob HornHalfback Norfolk, Virginia 5'10"17821
54 Sol LunaHalfbackPittsburg, Tennessee 5'8"16320
8 Russ RussellHalfbackNew York, New York 5'10"16019
Bob StricklandHalfbackSumter, South Carolina 5'10"17419

Source:[27]

Coaching staffEdit

[4]

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. Van Brimmer & Rice 2011, p. 147
  2. "Golden Tornadoes". gatech.edu. http://livinghistory.gatech.edu/new/traditions/tradition/tornado.html. Retrieved January 28, 2015.
  3. 2018 NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision Records. The National Collegiate Athletic Association. p. 112. http://fs.ncaa.org/Docs/stats/football_records/2018/FBS.pdf. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Garrett 2011, pp. 843–844
  5. 5.0 5.1 "Tech Ruins Georgia's Grid Title Hopes". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. December 4, 1927. https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1787&dat=19271204&id=Y7UeAAAAIBAJ&sjid=IWQEAAAAIBAJ&pg=3986,1492924&hl=en. Retrieved August 20, 2016.
  6. Van Brimmer 2006, p. 26
  7. "Return Of Tech Stars To Brighten Chances For Victory Over Rockne Eleven Next Fall". The Evening Independent. December 9, 1927. https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=950&dat=19271209&id=74oLAAAAIBAJ&sjid=3lQDAAAAIBAJ&pg=3674,656628&hl=en. Retrieved August 20, 2016.
  8. "Ed Crowley Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/c/crowled01.shtml. Retrieved August 22, 2016.
  9. Wade, Wallace (September 15, 1928). "Georgia Tech, Georgia, and Vandy Loom Strong In South, Wade Believes". The Anniston Star: p. 6. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/4488357/the_anniston_star/. Retrieved March 1, 2016. open access
  10. "Tech, Vandy, and Georgia Lead Conference Teams". The Evening Independent. September 24, 1928. https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=950&dat=19280924&id=LOBPAAAAIBAJ&sjid=pVQDAAAAIBAJ&pg=3185,4276828&hl=en. Retrieved August 20, 2016.
  11. "Georgia Tech's Gridmen Ready". St. Petersburg Times. September 24, 1928. https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=888&dat=19280924&id=qClPAAAAIBAJ&sjid=xk0DAAAAIBAJ&pg=6240,6793981&hl=en.
  12. "Henry R. "Peter" Pund". Georgia Sports Hall of Fame. http://georgiasportshalloffame.com/site/our-inductees/. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 "Meet the Georgia Tech Varsity highlights About Players Noted". Berkeley Daily Gazette. December 26, 1928. https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1970&dat=19281226&id=rhoiAAAAIBAJ&sjid=h6YFAAAAIBAJ&pg=2890,7320400&hl=en.
  14. "1928 Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets Schedule and Results". https://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/schools/georgia-tech/1928-schedule.html.
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 15.3 15.4 "Golden Tornado Outclasses V. M. I. In 13–0 Victory". The Technique: p. 4. October 12, 1928. https://smartech.gatech.edu/bitstream/handle/1853/33601/1928-10-12_18_03.pdf?sequence=1.
  16. "Georgia Tech Defeats V.M.I. Cadets, 13 to 0". The Anniston Star: p. 12. October 7, 1928. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/4493273/the_anniston_star/. Retrieved March 1, 2016. open access
  17. 17.0 17.1 17.2 "Georgia Tech Passes Beat Tulane". Oakland Tribune: p. 25. October 14, 1928. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/4493215/oakland_tribune/. Retrieved March 1, 2016. open access
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 Edward W. Lewis (October 21, 1928). "Georgia Tech Beats Notre Dame,13–0". Oakland Tribune: p. 96. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/4488375/oakland_tribune/. Retrieved March 1, 2016. open access
  19. Michael R. Steele (October 16, 2012). "The Notre Dame Football Encyclopedia". Skyhorse Publishing Inc.. p. 60. https://books.google.com/books?id=dCNrCgAAQBAJ&pg=PA60#v=onepage&q&f=false.
  20. Van Brimmer 2011, p. 199
  21. "Henry R. "Peter" Pund". Inductees. Georgia Sports Hall of Fame and Museum. Archived from the original on September 28, 2007. https://web.archive.org/web/20070928081502/http://www.gshf.org/site/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=254&Itemid=50. Retrieved August 11, 2007.
  22. Murray A. Spencer (1993). Shake Down the Thunder: The Creation of Notre Dame Football. Indiana University Press. p. 278. ISBN 0253215684. https://books.google.com/books?id=lXGEcVjBET0C&pg=PA278&lpg=PA278#v=onepage&q&f=false.
  23. 23.0 23.1 Pope 1955, pp. 9–11
  24. 24.0 24.1 24.2 H. C. Renegar (October 28, 1928). "Georgia Tech's Golden Tornado Sweeps North Carolina 20 To 7". Kingsport Times: p. 2. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/5114532/kingsport_times/. Retrieved April 30, 2016. open access
  25. "Georgia Plays First Time In North Carolina". The Daily Tar Heel: p. 5. October 27, 1928. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/4488244/the_daily_tar_heel/. Retrieved March 1, 2016. open access
  26. 26.0 26.1 "Georgia Tech Springs Aerial Attack To Win". The Anniston Star: p. 10. October 28, 1928. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/5115536/the_anniston_star/. Retrieved May 1, 2016. open access
  27. 27.0 27.1 27.2 27.3 27.4 27.5 "Georgia Tech Football Statistics". The Daily Tar Heel: p. 5. October 27, 1928. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/2012696//. Retrieved March 18, 2015. open access
  28. 28.0 28.1 28.2 28.3 28.4 "Tornado Wins Over Petrels In Last Half". The Anniston Star: p. 12. November 4, 1928. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/4493084/the_anniston_star/. Retrieved March 1, 2016. open access
  29. 29.0 29.1 29.2 "Petrels Hold Tornado To a Tie at the End of the Half". Technique: p. 4. November 9, 1928. https://smartech.gatech.edu/handle/1853/33484.
  30. "Tech-Oglethorpe Detail.". The Atlanta Journal. November 4, 1928. http://georgiatechticketstubs.com/collection/1920s/1928-season/1928-11-03-georgia-tech-vs-oglethorpe/.
  31. 31.0 31.1 31.2 31.3 "Tornado Takes Places As Grid King of South". The Anniston Star: p. 11. November 11, 1928. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/5114734/the_anniston_star/. Retrieved May 1, 2016. open access
  32. 32.0 32.1 "Hopes of Vandy in South Circuit Wrecked Today". The Waco News-Tribune: p. 6. November 11, 1928. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/4487928/the_waco_newstribune/. Retrieved March 1, 2016. open access
  33. "Georgia Tech 11 Whips Vanderbilt". The Oregon Statesman: p. 9. November 11, 1928. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/4487954/the_oregon_statesman/. Retrieved March 1, 2016. open access
  34. 34.0 34.1 34.2 34.3 34.4 "1928 Season Recap". University of Alabama. http://grfx.cstv.com/schools/alab/graphics/docs/28-m-footbl-recap.pdf. Retrieved August 20, 2016.
  35. "Mizell Leads Yellow Jackets To Seventh Win". The Anniston Star: p. 8. November 18, 1928. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/5115618/the_anniston_star/. Retrieved May 1, 2016. open access
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EndnotesEdit

ReferencesEdit

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