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(Created page with "{{Infobox College football season | year = 1905 | image = | image_caption = | number_of_teams = | preseason_ap = <!-- Not done prior to 1936 --> | regular_season = <!-- Please...")
 
 
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{{Infobox College football season
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{{Infobox college football season
 
| year = 1905
 
| year = 1905
| image =
+
| image = File:Bulldogs vs. Crimson football game 1905.JPG
| image_caption =
+
| image_caption = Harvard&ndash;Yale game.
  +
| image_size=320px
 
| number_of_teams =
 
| number_of_teams =
 
| preseason_ap = <!-- Not done prior to 1936 -->
 
| preseason_ap = <!-- Not done prior to 1936 -->
 
| regular_season = <!-- Please list date of first regular season game to date of last regular season game -->
 
| regular_season = <!-- Please list date of first regular season game to date of last regular season game -->
| number_of_bowls =
 
 
| bowl_start =
 
| bowl_start =
 
| bowl_end = <!-- No end date, only one date of bowl -->
 
| bowl_end = <!-- No end date, only one date of bowl -->
| champions =
+
| champion = [[1905 Chicago Maroons football team|Chicago Maroons]] <br> [[Yale Bulldogs football|Yale Bulldogs]]
 
| heisman = Not awarded until [[1935 college football season|1935]]
 
| heisman = Not awarded until [[1935 college football season|1935]]
 
}}
 
}}
The '''1905 college football season''' had no clear-cut champion, with the ''Official NCAA Division I Football Records Book'' listing [[Chicago Maroons football|Chicago]] and [[Yale Bulldogs football]] as [[NCAA Division I FBS national football championship|national champions]].<ref>{{cite book | url=http://web1.ncaa.org/web_files/stats/football_records/DI/2009/2009FBS.pdf | title=Official 2009 NCAA Division I Football Records Book | pages=76–77 | publisher=The National Collegiate Athletic Association | date=2009-08 | location=Indianapolis, IN | accessdate=2009-10-16}}</ref>
+
The '''1905 college football season''' had the [[1905 Chicago Maroons football team|Chicago Maroons]] retroactively named as national champion by the Billingsley Report, the Helms Athletic Foundation, the National Championship Foundation, and the Houlgate System, while [[Yale Bulldogs football|Yale]] was named champion by [[Parke H. Davis]] and [[Caspar Whitney]]. Chicago finished the season 11-0, while Yale finished 10-0. The ''Official NCAA Division I Football Records Book'' listed both [[Chicago Maroons football|Chicago]] and [[Yale Bulldogs football|Yale]] as having been selected [[NCAA Division I FBS national football championship|national champions]].<ref>{{cite book | url=http://web1.ncaa.org/web_files/stats/football_records/DI/2009/2009FBS.pdf | title=Official 2009 NCAA Division I Football Records Book | pages=70 | publisher=The National Collegiate Athletic Association | date=August 2009 | location=Indianapolis, IN | accessdate=2009-10-16}}</ref>
   
==Rule experiment==
+
==Conference and program changes==
On [[December 25]] in [[Wichita, Kansas]] an [[1905 Fairmount vs. Washburn football game|experimental game]] was played between [[Wichita State Shockers|Fairmount College]] and [[Washburn Ichabods|Washburn University]]. The game tested a rule change that required the offense to earn a [[first down]] in three plays instead of four. Football legend [[John H. Outland]] officiated the game and commented, "It seems to me that the distance required in three downs would almost eliminate touchdowns, except through fakes or flukes."<ref>[http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F60816FB3A5E12738DDDAF0A94DA415B858CF1D3 New York Times] "Ten Yard Rule a Failure" December 26, 1905</ref> The ''[[Los Angeles Times]]'' reported that there was much kicking and that the game was considered much safer than regular play, but that the new rule was not "conducive to the sport."<ref>[http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/latimes/access/349469012.html?dids=349469012:349469012&FMT=ABS&FMTS=ABS:AI&type=historic&date=Dec+26%2C+1905&author=&pub=Los+Angeles+Times&desc=NEW+FOOTBALL+RULES+TESTED.&pqatl=google Los Angeles Times] "New Football Rules Tested" December 26, 1905</ref>
+
===Membership changes===
  +
{| class="wikitable sortable"
  +
|-
  +
! School !! 1904 Conference !! 1905 Conference
  +
|- style="text-align:center;"
  +
|[[Western Michigan University|Western State Normal]] [[Western Michigan Broncos football|Hilltoppers]]||''Program Established'' || Independent
  +
|}
  +
  +
==Notable games==
  +
===Chicago vs. Michigan game===
  +
[[File:Western_Championship_Chicago_Michigan,_November_1905.jpg|thumb|290px]]
  +
In the final game of the season on November 30, 1905, [[Amos Alonzo Stagg]]'s Chicago team and [[Fielding Yost]]'s Michigan squad met in a battle of undefeated [[Big Ten Conference|Western Conference]] powerhouses. The teams played at Chicago's Marshall Field in front of 27,000 spectators, at that time the largest crowd to view a football game. Michigan was 12&ndash;0 and had a 56-game undefeated streak on the line, while Chicago was 10&ndash;0.
  +
  +
The game was a punting duel between Chicago's All-American [[Walter Eckersall]] and Michigan's [[John Garrels]] and was scoreless until early in the third quarter when a Michigan punt and Chicago penalty pinned Chicago inside their own ten-yard line. On third down, as Eckersall attempted to punt, he encountered a fearsome rush, but evaded the Michigan tacklers and was able to scramble to the 22-yard line and a first down. After three more first downs, the drive stalled and Chicago was forced to punt again. Eckersall's booming punt carried into the end zone where it was caught by Michigan's [[William Dennison Clark]] who attempted to run the ball out. He advanced the ball forward to the one-yard line, but was hit hard by [[Art Badenoch]] and then was brought back inside his own end zone by [[Mark Catlin]] for a two-point safety. Under the rules of the time, forward progress was not credited, and a ball carrier could be carried backwards or forwards until he was down. The rest of third and fourth quarters continued as a defensive stalemate. Chicago's 2&ndash;0 victory snapped Michigan's 56-game unbeaten streak and gave Chicago the consensus national championship for 1905.
  +
  +
As a tragic note to this game, Clark received the blame for the Michigan loss, and in 1932 he shot himself through the heart. In a suicide note to his wife he reportedly expressed the hope that his "final play" would be of some benefit in atoning for his error at Marshall Field.
  +
  +
===Night football===
  +
During the season, the first [[1905 Cooper vs. Fairmount football game|night football game west of the Mississippi]] was played in [[Wichita, Kansas]] between Fairmount College (now [[Wichita State University]] and Cooper College (now [[Sterling College (Kansas)|Sterling College]]). The [[Coleman Company]] provided lights for the game.<ref name=Coleman>{{cite web|url=http://www.coleman.com/FirstLight/|title=FIRST LIGHT (1900&nbsp;– 1929)|publisher=[[Coleman Company]]|accessdate=October 13, 2015}}</ref>
  +
  +
===Rule experiment===
  +
On December 25 in [[Wichita, Kansas]] an [[1905 Washburn vs. Fairmount football game|experimental game]] was played between [[Wichita State Shockers|Fairmount College]] and [[Washburn Ichabods|Washburn University]]. The game tested a rule change that required the offense to earn a [[first down]] in three plays instead of four. Football legend [[John H. Outland]] officiated the game and commented, "It seems to me that the distance required in three downs would almost eliminate touchdowns, except through fakes or flukes."<ref>[https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1905/12/26/101375075.pdf New York Times] "Ten Yard Rule a Failure" December 26, 1905</ref> The ''[[Los Angeles Times]]'' reported that there was much kicking and that the game was considered much safer than regular play, but that the new rule was not "conducive to the sport."<ref>[https://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/latimes/access/349469012.html?dids=349469012:349469012&FMT=ABS&FMTS=ABS:AI&type=historic&date=Dec+26%2C+1905&author=&pub=Los+Angeles+Times&desc=NEW+FOOTBALL+RULES+TESTED.&pqatl=google Los Angeles Times] "New Football Rules Tested" December 26, 1905</ref> Some of the rules for this game were based on the [[Burnside rules]] which govern the Canadian game.
  +
  +
==Conference standings==
  +
The following is a potentially incomplete list of conference standings:
  +
{| cellpadding="5"
  +
|valign="top" width=25em|{{1905 Big 9 football standings}}
  +
|valign="top" width=25em|{{1905 MIAA football standings}}
  +
|valign="top" width=25em|{{1905 SIAA football standings}}
  +
|-
  +
|valign="top" width=25em|{{1905 college football independents records}}
  +
|}
  +
  +
===Minor conferences===
  +
{| class="wikitable" style="text-align:center;"
  +
|-
  +
!Conference
  +
!Champion(s)
  +
!Record
  +
|-
  +
| [[Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association]]
  +
| [[Michigan State Spartans football|State Agricultural College]]
  +
| 5–0–0
  +
|-
  +
| [[Ohio Athletic Conference]]
  +
| [[1905 Case football team|Case School of Applied Science]]
  +
| 4–0–1
  +
|}
  +
  +
==Awards and honors==
  +
  +
===All-Americans===
  +
{{main|1905 College Football All-America Team}}
  +
The consensus [[College Football All-America Team|All-America]] team included:
  +
{| class="wikitable" style="font-size: 90%"
  +
!style="background: #e3e3e3;"|Position
  +
!style="background: #e3e3e3;"|Name
  +
!style="background: #e3e3e3;"|Height
  +
!style="background: #e3e3e3;"|Weight (lbs.)
  +
!style="background: #e3e3e3;"|Class
  +
!style="background: #e3e3e3;"|Hometown
  +
!style="background: #e3e3e3;"|Team
  +
|-
  +
|[[Quarterback|QB]]
  +
|[[Walter Eckersall]]
  +
|5'7"
  +
|141
  +
|Jr.
  +
|[[Chicago, Illinois]]
  +
|'''[[1905 Chicago Maroons football team|Chicago]]'''
  +
|-
  +
|[[Quarterback|QB]]
  +
|[[Guy Hutchinson]]
  +
|
  +
|
  +
|
  +
|
  +
|'''[[1905 Yale Bulldogs football team|Yale]]'''
  +
|-
  +
|[[Halfback (American football)|HB]]
  +
|[[Jack Hubbard]]
  +
|
  +
|
  +
|Sr.
  +
|
  +
|'''[[Amherst Lord Jeffs football|Amherst]]'''
  +
|-
  +
|[[Halfback (American football)|HB]]
  +
|[[Daniel Hurley (American football)|Daniel Hurley]]
  +
|
  +
|
  +
|Sr..
  +
|[[Charlestown, Massachusetts]]
  +
|'''[[1905 Harvard Crimson football team|Harvard]]'''
  +
|-
  +
|[[Halfback (American football)|HB]]
  +
|[[Howard Roome]]
  +
|
  +
|
  +
|Jr.
  +
|
  +
|'''[[1905 Yale Bulldogs football team|Yale]]'''
  +
|-
  +
|[[Halfback (American football)|HB]]
  +
|[[Henry Torney]]
  +
|
  +
|
  +
|Sr.
  +
|
  +
|'''[[1905 Army Cadets football team|Army]]'''
  +
|-
  +
|[[Fullback (American football)|FB]]
  +
|[[James B. McCormick]]
  +
|
  +
|
  +
|So.
  +
|
  +
|'''[[1905 Princeton Tigers football team|Princeton]]'''
  +
|-
  +
|[[End (American football)|E]]
  +
|[[Mark Catlin Sr.]]
  +
|
  +
|
  +
|Sr.
  +
|
  +
|'''[[1905 Chicago Maroons football team|Chicago]]'''
  +
|-
  +
|[[End (American football)|E]]
  +
|[[Tom Shevlin]]
  +
|5'10"
  +
|195
  +
|Sr.
  +
|[[Minneapolis, Minnesota]]
  +
|'''[[1905 Yale Bulldogs football team|Yale]]'''
  +
|-
  +
|[[Tackle (American football)|T]]
  +
|[[Karl Brill]]
  +
|
  +
|
  +
|So.
  +
|
  +
|'''[[1905 Harvard Crimson football team|Harvard]]'''
  +
|-
  +
|[[Tackle (American football)|T]]
  +
|[[Beaton Squires]]
  +
|
  +
|
  +
|Sr.
  +
|
  +
|'''[[1905 Harvard Crimson football team|Harvard]]'''
  +
|-
  +
|[[Guard (American football)|G]]
  +
|[[Francis Burr]]
  +
|
  +
|
  +
|Jr.
  +
|[[Brookline, Massachusetts]]
  +
|'''[[1905 Harvard Crimson football team|Harvard]]'''
  +
|-
  +
|[[Center (American football)|C]]
  +
|[[Robert Torrey]]
  +
|
  +
|
  +
|Sr.
  +
|[[Montclair, New Jersey]]
  +
|'''[[1905 Penn Quakers football team|Penn]]'''
  +
|-
  +
|[[Guard (American football)|G]]
  +
|[[Roswell Tripp]]
  +
|
  +
|
  +
|Sr.
  +
|
  +
|'''[[1905 Yale Bulldogs football team|Yale]]'''
  +
|-
  +
|[[Tackle (American football)|T]]
  +
|[[Otis Lamson]]
  +
|
  +
|
  +
|Sr.
  +
|
  +
|'''[[1905 Penn Quakers football team|Penn]]'''
  +
|-
  +
|[[End (American football)|E]]
  +
|[[Ralph Glaze]]
  +
|5'8"
  +
|153
  +
|Sr.
  +
|
  +
|'''[[1905 Dartmouth football team|Dartmouth]]'''
  +
|-
  +
|}
   
 
==See also==
 
==See also==
Line 22: Line 21:
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
{{reflist}}
 
{{reflist}}
{{collegefootball-season-stub}}
 
{{NCAA football seasons}}
 
   
  +
{{NCAA football season navbox}}
 
[[Category:1905 college football season|*]]
 
[[Category:1905 college football season|*]]

Latest revision as of 16:50, September 15, 2019

The 1905 college football season had the Chicago Maroons retroactively named as national champion by the Billingsley Report, the Helms Athletic Foundation, the National Championship Foundation, and the Houlgate System, while Yale was named champion by Parke H. Davis and Caspar Whitney. Chicago finished the season 11-0, while Yale finished 10-0. The Official NCAA Division I Football Records Book listed both Chicago and Yale as having been selected national champions.[1]

Conference and program changesEdit

Membership changesEdit

School 1904 Conference 1905 Conference
Western State Normal HilltoppersProgram Established Independent

Notable gamesEdit

Chicago vs. Michigan gameEdit

File:Western Championship Chicago Michigan, November 1905.jpg

In the final game of the season on November 30, 1905, Amos Alonzo Stagg's Chicago team and Fielding Yost's Michigan squad met in a battle of undefeated Western Conference powerhouses. The teams played at Chicago's Marshall Field in front of 27,000 spectators, at that time the largest crowd to view a football game. Michigan was 12–0 and had a 56-game undefeated streak on the line, while Chicago was 10–0.

The game was a punting duel between Chicago's All-American Walter Eckersall and Michigan's John Garrels and was scoreless until early in the third quarter when a Michigan punt and Chicago penalty pinned Chicago inside their own ten-yard line. On third down, as Eckersall attempted to punt, he encountered a fearsome rush, but evaded the Michigan tacklers and was able to scramble to the 22-yard line and a first down. After three more first downs, the drive stalled and Chicago was forced to punt again. Eckersall's booming punt carried into the end zone where it was caught by Michigan's William Dennison Clark who attempted to run the ball out. He advanced the ball forward to the one-yard line, but was hit hard by Art Badenoch and then was brought back inside his own end zone by Mark Catlin for a two-point safety. Under the rules of the time, forward progress was not credited, and a ball carrier could be carried backwards or forwards until he was down. The rest of third and fourth quarters continued as a defensive stalemate. Chicago's 2–0 victory snapped Michigan's 56-game unbeaten streak and gave Chicago the consensus national championship for 1905.

As a tragic note to this game, Clark received the blame for the Michigan loss, and in 1932 he shot himself through the heart. In a suicide note to his wife he reportedly expressed the hope that his "final play" would be of some benefit in atoning for his error at Marshall Field.

Night footballEdit

During the season, the first night football game west of the Mississippi was played in Wichita, Kansas between Fairmount College (now Wichita State University and Cooper College (now Sterling College). The Coleman Company provided lights for the game.[2]

Rule experimentEdit

On December 25 in Wichita, Kansas an experimental game was played between Fairmount College and Washburn University. The game tested a rule change that required the offense to earn a first down in three plays instead of four. Football legend John H. Outland officiated the game and commented, "It seems to me that the distance required in three downs would almost eliminate touchdowns, except through fakes or flukes."[3] The Los Angeles Times reported that there was much kicking and that the game was considered much safer than regular play, but that the new rule was not "conducive to the sport."[4] Some of the rules for this game were based on the Burnside rules which govern the Canadian game.

Conference standingsEdit

The following is a potentially incomplete list of conference standings:

1905 Big 9 football standings
v · d · e Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Chicago 7 0 0     11 0 0
Michigan 2 1 0     12 1 0
Minnesota 2 1 0     10 1 0
Purdue 1 1 1     6 1 1
Wisconsin 1 2 0     8 2 0
Indiana 0 1 1     8 1 1
Iowa 0 2 0     8 2 0
Northwestern 0 2 0     8 2 1
Illinois 0 3 0     5 4 0
† – Conference champion
1905 MIAA football standings
v · d · e Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Michigan Agricultural §           9 2 0
§ – Conference co-champions
1905 SIAA football standings
v · d · e Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Vanderbilt 6 0 0     7 1 0
Georgia Tech 5 0 1     6 0 1
LSU 2 0 0     3 0 0
Texas 2 1 0     5 4 0
Sewanee 3 2 1     4 2 1
Clemson 3 2 1     3 2 1
Alabama 4 4 0     6 4 0
Cumberland 2 2 0     4 4 0
Nashville 0 0 0     0 2 0
Auburn 2 3 0     2 4 0
Mississippi A&M 1 4 0     3 4 0
Texas A&M 0 1 0     7 2 0
Tulane 0 1 0     0 1 0
Ole Miss 0 2 0     0 2 0
Tennessee 0 4 1     3 5 1
Georgia 0 5 0     1 5 0
† – Conference champion
1905 college football independents records
v · d · e Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Yale         10 0 0
Penn         12 0 1
Stanford         8 0 0
Kentucky U.         7 0 3
Stetson         4 0 1
Kansas         10 1 0
Navy         10 1 1
VPI         9 1 0
Colorado         8 1 0
Case         8 1 1
Dartmouth         7 1 2
Central Michigan         7 1 0
Swarthmore         7 1 0
Chattanooga         6 1 0
Western U. of Penn.         10 2 0
Nebraska         9 2 0
Princeton         8 2 0
Harvard         8 2 1
Oklahoma         7 2 0
Washington and Lee         7 2 0
Wesleyan         7 2 1
Washington & Jefferson         9 3 0
Penn State         8 3 0
Kansas State         6 2 0
Utah         6 2 0
Carlisle         10 4 0
Washburn         7 3 0
Oregon Agricultural         6 3 0
Iowa State         6 3 0
West Virginia         6 3 0
South Carolina         4 2 1
California         4 1 2
Arizona         4 2 0
Kentucky State         6 3 1
USC         6 3 1
Cornell         6 4 0
Maryland         6 4 0
Oregon         4 2 2
Washington         4 2 2
Missouri         5 4 0
Notre Dame         5 4 0
Virginia         5 4 0
North Carolina         4 3 1
Army         4 4 1
Michigan State Normal         4 4 0
TCU         4 4 0
Washington State         4 4 0
Connecticut         2 2 0
Wyoming         3 4 0
Wabash         4 5 0
Richmond         3 5 2
Montana         2 3 0
Geneva         4 6 0
Rutgers         3 6 0
Villanova         3 7 0
Delaware         3 4 1
William & Mary         2 4 1
The Citadel         2 3 1
VMI         2 5 1
Oklahoma A&M         1 3 2
Arkansas         2 6 0
Kendall         1 3 0
Baylor         1 6 0
Tempe         0 3 0

Minor conferencesEdit

Conference Champion(s) Record
Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association State Agricultural College 5–0–0
Ohio Athletic Conference Case School of Applied Science 4–0–1

Awards and honorsEdit

All-AmericansEdit

The consensus All-America team included:

Position Name Height Weight (lbs.) Class Hometown Team
QB Walter Eckersall 5'7" 141 Jr. Chicago, Illinois Chicago
QB Guy Hutchinson Yale
HB Jack Hubbard Sr. Amherst
HB Daniel Hurley Sr.. Charlestown, Massachusetts Harvard
HB Howard Roome Jr. Yale
HB Henry Torney Sr. Army
FB James B. McCormick So. Princeton
E Mark Catlin Sr. Sr. Chicago
E Tom Shevlin 5'10" 195 Sr. Minneapolis, Minnesota Yale
T Karl Brill So. Harvard
T Beaton Squires Sr. Harvard
G Francis Burr Jr. Brookline, Massachusetts Harvard
C Robert Torrey Sr. Montclair, New Jersey Penn
G Roswell Tripp Sr. Yale
T Otis Lamson Sr. Penn
E Ralph Glaze 5'8" 153 Sr. Dartmouth

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. Official 2009 NCAA Division I Football Records Book. Indianapolis, IN: The National Collegiate Athletic Association. August 2009. pp. 70. http://web1.ncaa.org/web_files/stats/football_records/DI/2009/2009FBS.pdf. Retrieved 2009-10-16.
  2. "FIRST LIGHT (1900 – 1929)". Coleman Company. http://www.coleman.com/FirstLight/. Retrieved October 13, 2015.
  3. New York Times "Ten Yard Rule a Failure" December 26, 1905
  4. Los Angeles Times "New Football Rules Tested" December 26, 1905
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